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Full text of "Bulletin, Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia, 1969-70"

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of the University 
of Virginia 

CATALOGUE ISSUE 1969-70 



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yyashington (olleg< 

of the University 
of Virginia 

CATALOGUE ISSUE 1969-70 



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VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome at Mary Washington College, and pro- 
vision usually can be made, when the College is in session, to 
guide them through the buildings and grounds. 

A personal interview is not ordinarily required for admission. 
However, when planning to visit the College, an applicant should 
make an appointment well in advance. 



Table of Contents 



Calendar 

General Information 

Admissions 

Finances 

Student Life 

Academic Information 

Program of Studies 

Course Offerings 

Directory 



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TABLE OF 


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CONTENTS 


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COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Summer Session 1969 

Residence halls open June 22 

Registration June 23 

Classes begin June 24 

Holiday J uly 4 

Reading Day August 1 3 

Final examinations August 14, 15, 16 

Session 1969- 1970 

First Semester 

Residence halls open for new students Saturday, September 13 

Freshman orientation assembly Monday, September 15 

Registration of new students including transfer 

students, Science Hall Tuesday, September 16 

Residence halls open for 

returning students Tuesday, September 16 

Registration of returning 

students, Science Hall Wednesday, September 17 

Classes begin Thursday , September 1 8 

CALENDAR Chancellor's Convocation and Awarding of Intermediate 

Honors Thursday, September 18 

Mid-semester reports due Friday, November 7 

Thanksgiving holidays begin 2:05 p.m., Wednesday, November 26 

Class work resumed 8:00 a.m., Monday, December 1 

Christmas holidays begin 5:30 p.m., Friday, December 19 

Class work resumed 8:00 a.m., Monday, January 5 

Reading Days Monday and Tuesday, January 19, 20 

Mid-year examinations January 2 1 -30 

Second Semester 

Registration of new students, 

George Washington Hall Saturday, February 7 

Classes begin Monday , February 9 

Mid-semester reports due Wednesday, March 25 

Spring holidays begin 5: 30 p. m. , Friday , March 27 

Class work resumed 8:00 a.m., Monday, April 6 

Reading Days May 21, 22 

Final examinations May 25 to June 3 

Graduating exercises Sunday , J une 7 

Summer Session 1970 

Dates to be Announced 



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Introduction 

Mary Washington College is a state-aided liberal arts college 
for women and a part of the University of Virginia. As such, it 
has an obligation to the people of the Commonwealth of Virginia 
to provide, without regard to race, creed or national origins, the 
best education it can for those students who give promise of 
succeeding in college. 

As a liberal arts college, Mary Washington stands firmly in 
the conviction that a broad education in the arts, the sciences, 
and the humanities, complemented by intensive study in a particular 
field of interest, is a most appropriate preparation for life and 
citizenship. 

As a college for women, Mary Washington endeavors to pro- 
vide the best intellectual background possible for the woman of 
today. It recognizes the importance of the inquiring mind, the 
significance of aesthetic sensibility and the necessity of individual 
and corporate responsibility. 

Finally, as a part of the University of Virginia, Mary Washing- 
ton College has a unique role to fill in Virginia education, and 
is pledged to the selection of a qualified student body, to the 
maintenance of a competent faculty and staff, and to the develop- 
ment of the academic and social environment necessary to achieve 
its goals. 




GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



Mary Washington college is accredited by the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools. It is a member of the 
Southern University Conference, the American Council on Educa- 
tion, the Association of American Colleges, the Association of 
Virginia Colleges, the College Entrance Examination Board, the 
National Commission on Accrediting, the Southern Association of 
Colleges for Women, the University Center in Virginia, and the 
National Association of Schools of Music. 

Mary Washington College is a corporate member of the Ameri- 
can Association of University Women, which is affiliated with the 
International Federation of University Women (IFUW). Graduates 
are eligible for membership in the national and international 
organizations. There is a local branch of the AAUW in Fredericks- 
burg. 



History 

Founded as the Fredericksburg Normal and Industrial School 
for Women in 1908, Mary Washington College has experienced 
a growth closely paralleling the development of education for 
women in the State of Virginia. The coordination of the College 
with the University of Virginia was the culmination of efforts 
by the women of Virginia to gain educational opportunities 
comparable to those provided by the State for men. 



By the beginning of this century the Virginia General Assembly 
began a move to provide a more adequate education for the 
young women in the state. This resulted in the establishment of 
two normal schools, one in Fredericksburg and the other in 
Harrisonburg. In 1909 the State made an appropriation of $25,000 
for the purchase of land in or near Fredericksburg. A sixty-acre 
site on Marye's Heights overlooking the city was subsequently 
chosen. By 1924 the normal school had developed beyond its 
original mission and as a result of action by the General Assembly, 
the College then became the State Teachers' College, Fredericks- 
burg. 

The curriculum was divided into a two-year and four-year 
program. Those students successfully completing the four-year 
program received a B.S. degree in education plus the regular 
state collegiate professional certificate, while those completing the 
two-year program earned a normal professional or special teacher's 
certificate. 

A further change occurred in 1935 when, in recognition of the 
necessity for providing a balanced education for women that was 
not oriented solely toward the teaching profession, the College 
was given the additional privilege of conferring degrees in the 
liberal arts, as well as in the professional, vocational, and technical 
fields. From this point on, the College was in fact a state college 
for women. 

This shift in emphasis led in turn to the third change of name 
for the Fredericksburg institution— to Mary Washington College— 
by act of the General Assembly in 1938. 




GENERAL 
INFORMATION 




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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 




The fourth major change occurred in 1944 when a bill was 
brought before the state legislature to make Mary Washington 
College the undergraduate college of arts and sciences for women 
of the University of Virginia. 

With the establishment of Mary Washington College as the 
women's college of the University, emphasis was placed upon the 
liberal arts. Courses that were regarded as primarily vocational 
were either eliminated or continued on a non-credit basis. By 
1948 the initial transition was completed. 

Since that time, academic growth has continued. A number of 
changes have been implemented to emphasize further Mary Wash- 
ington College's role as a liberal arts college for women; as the 
needs for women in liberal arts have changed, so too has the 
College. 

One of the few state-aided liberal arts colleges for women in 
America, Mary Washington draws its students from many states 
and enrolls a number of students from foreign countries. 

The name— Mary Washington College— combines historic signific- 
ance and background with local associations. Within sight of the 
hill on which the College is located are the home and tomb of 
Mary Washington; and Kenmore, the home of her daughter, 
Betty Washington Lewis. The College grounds were at one time 
a part of the Lewis estate. 



Location and Environment 

The Mary Washington College campus, which also includes the 
historic Brompton estate, comprises 381 acres, the major part 
situated on Marye's Heights overlooking the city of Fredericks- 
burg and the Rappahannock Valley. Immediately adjacent to the 
Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, the 
grounds were the site of the Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg; 
long before that, it is said, a portion of the area was an Indian 
village. 

The City of Fredericksburg has now enveloped the College 
property, which has, however, remained an integral unit, un- 
broken by the urban development. Some thirty-three buildings are 
located on the campus and, in addition, there are a golf course, 
athletic fields and tennis courts, outdoor and indoor swimming 
pools, and an outdoor amphitheatre. Though the buildings are 
widely situated on the wooded grounds, they are within easy 
walking distance of one another and not far from the downtown 
business district of Fredericksburg and other more recently con- 
structed shopping centers. 



Fredericksburg is situated halfway between Washington, D.C. 
(55 miles), and Richmond, Virginia (55 miles), and is easily 
accessible from the north or south on Interstate Highway 95 or 
U.S. Route 1, or from the east or west on U.S. Route 17 or 
Virginia Route 3. Bus transportation (Greyhound or Trailways) 
and rail transportation (Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac 
Railroad) are also readily accessible. The closest commercial 
airlines facilities are at the National Airport and Dulles Inter- 
national Airport, both serving Washington, D.C, and each an 
hour's ride from the College; or at Byrd Airport in Richmond, 
only slightly further away. 

Fredericksburg is a city of 15,000 with modern shopping and 
tourist facilities. There exists a very cordial relationship between 
the College and the community, and the students are a part of 
this relationship whether as shoppers, as part-time employees at 
local businesses, or as members of church congregations. 

The City and surrounding area have played an important role 
in American history from the time Captain John Smith and his 
followers sailed up the Rappahannock River in 1608 until the 
present. Sometimes called ''America's Most Historic City," 
Fredericksburg is identified with much of the nation's earlier 
history. Americans such as Alexander Spotswood, George Wash- 
ington, James Monroe, James Madison, and John Paul Jones 
were closely associated with it, as were many other colonial 
history-makers. In addition, four major engagements of the Civil 
War were fought in the Fredericksburg area— all encompassing 
Marye's Heights where the College is located— and the reminders 
of America's heritage are still clearly present. 

Brompton, now a part of the College grounds and the residence 
of its Chancellor, was once headquarters for the Confederate 
forces defending the City and center of the Federal attack in 
both the first and second battles of Fredericksburg. Also located 
on the College grounds is a memorial to Confederate Sergeant 
Richard Kirkland of South Carolina, a hero of the Battle of 
Fredericksburg. The memorial was created by sculptor Felix de- 
Weldonand dedicated in 1965. 

Thousands of interested Americans and foreign visitors come 
to Fredericksburg each year to re-live history by touring these 
important landmarks. As an accomodation the City operates 
Information Centers on Interstate Highway 95 and at the corner 
of U.S. Route 1 and Princess Anne Street in the City. 




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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 




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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



Buildings and Accommodations 

The architecture of Mary Washington College may best be 
described as neo-classical in the Jeffersonian tradition. The red 
brick, white-columned buildings have been situated in an orderly 
manner on the campus, utilizing as much as possible the existing 
natural surroundings. There are now a total of thirty-three 
structures, including eighteen residence halls and nine academic 
buildings. 

Academic Buildings 

Chandler Hall. Named in memory of Algernon B. Chandler, 
Jr., president of the College from 1919 until his death in 1928, 
this building contains offices, classrooms, seminar rooms, and 
laboratories for English, home economics, and psychology. 
Combs Science Hall. This modern, four-story science complex 
honors the late Morgan L. Combs, President of the College from 
1929 to 1955. It provides lecture rooms, offices, laboratories, 
and other facilities for instruction in astronomy, biology, chemistry, 
geography, geology, mathematics, and physics. It has adequate 
space to make possible continued expansion of course offerings 
in these fields. A botanical greenhouse addition is currently under 
construction and scheduled for use during the 1969-70 school 
session. 

Fine Arts Center. The Fine Arts Center contains three separate 
buildings connected by arcades: Jessie Ball duPont Hall, Gari 
Melchers Hall, and John Garland Pollard Hall. 




duPont Hall. The central building of the group constituting the 
fine arts complex is named in honor of Jessie Ball (Mrs. Alfred 
I.) duPont of Wilmington, Delaware, and Ditchley, Virginia, 
in recognition of her interest and generosity to the College and 
of the fact that she is a close lineal descendant of Mary Ball 
Washington for whom the College is named. This central unit 
contains exhibit rooms, classrooms, a broadcasting studio, and 
language laboratories. It also houses a theatre with a seating 
capacity of 300, rehearsal rooms, make-up rooms, and a scenery 
loft. Classes in dramatic arts and speech and modern foreign 
languages use these facilities. 

Melchers Hall. The south building of the complex is named 
in honor of the late Gari Melchers, internationally known artist, 
whose home, Belmont, in nearby Falmouth, is now a memorial 
under the trusteeship of the College. Melchers Hall is devoted to 
such arts as painting, sculpture, and ceramics, and contains class- 
rooms, studios, kilns, offices, and workrooms. Housed here also 
is the fast-growing and carefully selected slide library for use in 
the art history classes. 

Pollard Hall. The north building, bearing the name of the late 
John Garland Pollard, Governor of Virginia, Attorney-General, 
college professor, and patron of the arts, is devoted exclusively to 
music. It contains classrooms, studios for individual instruction, 
band practice rooms, and offices. 

Monroe Hall. This structure was named for President James 
Monroe, who lived in Fredericksburg and whose life was closely 
identified with the community. It contains classrooms and offices 
for the departments of classics, economics and political science, 
education, history, and religion. It has an assembly hall with a 
seating capacity of about 200. 



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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 




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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



E. Lee Trinkle Library. Named in honor of the late E. Lee 
Trinkle, former Governor of Virginia and for many years President 
of the State Board of Education, once the governing board of the 
College, the library contains more than 185,000 volumes. 

It is a large air-conditioned facility and provides ample study 
and reading space. An open stack system permits students to 
browse and to work directly with the book collection. Typing 
rooms, individual study cubicles, microfilm readers, coin-operated 
xerox facilities, and a hook-up on a state-wide library teletype 
system for inter-library lending are a few of the services and 
facilities available. 

In an effort to maintain accurate and up-to-date material for 
classroom and research purposes the library subscribes to and 
catalogues nearly 900 periodicals and newspapers. This list in- 
cludes 132 foreign and 710 domestic periodicals and 7 foreign 
and 21 domestic newspapers. 

In addition, the library is a depository for other selected govern- 
ment documents; it maintains a record collection as well as a 
music manuscript collection. 

In 1964, the library opened a rare books room which provides 
ready access to a growing collection of first editions and books 
of particular rarity. Special attention is currently being given to 
books by and about James Joyce and the nineteenth century 
French physiologist, Claude Bernard, as well as to books on 
eighteenth centruy architecture, landscaping and gardening. 
George Washington Hall. This facility is named in honor of 
George Washington, whose life was closely connected with 
Fredericksburg and this section of Virginia. It contains the ad- 
ministrative offices, classroom and office facilities for the philosophy 
department, the telephone exchange for the College, the internal 
mail facility and central duplication services for the College. 
It also contains the largest auditorium on the campus with a 
seating capacity of more than 1 ,600. 

Goolrick Hall. The newest building on the campus has been 
named for the late C. O' Conor Goolrick, who, as a member of 
the General Assembly of Virginia, sponsored the 1908 legislation 
establishing the College. It contains all the facilities and equipment 
necessary for a complete physical education program. There are, 
for example, an indoor swimming pool, a large gymnasium and 
auxiliary gym, a handball court, dance studios, sun decks, and 

an exercise room. In addition to health and physical education 
classes, the sociology department has offices and classrooms 
in the building. 



Other Buildings 

Brompton. Brompton is the home of the Chancellor of the 
College and is situated on a 174- acre site near the main campus. 
The first unit of the colonial brick mansion is believed to have 
been erected about 1730. It was enlarged and completed in 1836 
by Colonel John L. Marye and restored, after purchase by the 
College, in 1946. 

In a report by historians for the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania 
National Military Park, it is stated that "no other house on the 
American continent is more important or better known in con- 
nection with military history, and few other homes are better 
examples of their type". 

Also located on this tract of land, which comprises the major 
portion of the original estate, is the College's nine-hole golf course. 
Belmont. Located in Falmouth across the Rappahannock River 
from Fredericksburg, Belmont is the estate where Gari Melchers, 
the noted American artist, lived and worked during the last 
sixteen years of his distinguished career. As a memorial to her 
husband, Mrs. Corinne Lawton Mackall Melchers deeded Belmont 
and many of his paintings to the Commonwealth of Virginia. 
The property is now administered by Mary Washington College. 
Many of the Melchers paintings may be seen in the College 
offices and other buildings. 

Anne Fairfax. Named in memory of the wife of George Washing- 
ton's half-brother, Lawrence, this white frame structure faces Col- 
lege Avenue and is currently the residence of the Dean of Students. 
Ann Carter Lee Hall. Popularly known as the "Student Activities" 
building, this structure bears the name of the mother of Robert 
E. Lee. It provides such recreational areas as a ballroom, recep- 
tion rooms, television facilities, informal lounges, the College 
bookstore, and the "C Shoppe," a campus snack bar. It also 
contains an indoor swimming pool and bowling alleys. Located 
here is the office of the Director of Student Affairs, as are the 
offices of the major student organizations. 

Hugh Mercer Infirmary. Named for Dr. Hugh Mercer, a physician 
of Fredericksburg and a brigadier-general in the Revolutionary 
War, the infirmary is a modern, thirty-seven bed medical facility. 
Every room is provided with private or connecting bath. There 
are also isolation wards, a solarium, a sun deck, a dining room 
and kitchen. 

It is maintained on a twenty-four hour a day basis by a staff 
of nurses, and a staff of physicians residing in the community 
are available at all times. 



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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



Seacobeck Hall. A seacobeck Indian village once occupied the 
present site of the campus dining hall. It has a central kitchen, 
five main dining areas, and a reception room. It also is equipped 
with its own bakery, ice plant and storage facilities. 
Spotswood House. Originally built as a home and used for a 
time as a small residence hall, this frame building located opposite 
the main entrance to the College is now occupied by the Alumnae 
Association. Alexander Spotswood was a colonial governor of Vir- 
ginia. 

Amphitheatre. The outdoor amphitheatre is set on the slope of 
a hill in a natural grove of trees and has a seating capacity of 
approximately 1 ,500. It is the site of the annual May Festival at 
the College. 

Post Office. The College Station, a branch of the Fredericksburg 
Post Office, is located on College Avenue, across the street from 
the main campus, and provides individual mail boxes for students 
in addition to other postal services. 



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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 











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Residence Halls 

The eighteen (13 major and 5 minor) residence halls on campus 
are for the most part centrally located and close to the academic 
buildings. All of them provide comfortable housing with ample 
ventilation and light. The major halls accommodate from 50 to 
180 students, while the minor halls normally house from 15 to 
20 students. These smaller facilities serve as special purpose dormi- 
tories, such as language houses, and one of them is the residence 
of the student government president and three other student officials. 

Many of the halls are arranged in suites with connecting baths, 
while the newer structures employ a "unit complex" concept in 
which small groups of students reside in two-student rooms and 
share common facilities somewhat as they would do at home. 

All of the major residence halls have reception rooms, recrea- 
tion areas, kitchenettes, washers and driers, and pressing rooms. 
Each hall is also equipped with a color television set, usually 
located in the recreation area, which will receive educational as 
well as commercial network programs. Students may bring their 
own sets if they desire, but external antennas are not available. 

Students admitted to the College as freshmen are assigned a 
room in one of four predominantly freshman residence halls on 
the campus. Returning students select their roommate and room 
during the preceding school session. 



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Admission Requirements 

The general requirements for admission to Mary Washington 
College are as follows: 

Scholastic Preparation. 

The general academic requirements for admission are graduation 
from an accredited* high school or preparatory school, and credit 
for at least fifteen acceptable entrance units.** 

The fifteen academic units must include the following: English 
(four units), college preparatory mathematics (three units selected 
from algebra, geometry, trigonometry and calculus, or a combina- 
tion of these courses), foreign language (two units in the same 
language), social studies (one unit), and science (one unit). The 
remaining units are elective, but no credit is allowed for less than 
two units in a foreign language. 

A student attending a five-year school or one who begins tradi- 
tional secondary school subjects in the eighth grade must complete 
seventeen academic units in order to meet the minimum require- 
ments for admission. In any case, eleven of the units must be 
distributed as outlined in the preceding paragraph. 

Examinations 

An applicant is required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test; 
the achievement tests in English composition and in a foreign 
language, preferably the language to be continued in college; and 
an achievement test in a field in which she wishes to demonstrate 
special aptitude or proficiency. 

The tests normally should be taken in December or January 
of the senior year. Under no circumstances can a test date later 
than the January administration of the senior year be used for 
purposes of admission in September. Candidates for enrollment in 
February must complete the tests no later than the December test- 
ing. A student may submit the results of test taken prior to the 
senior year if the scores are comparable to the average maintained 
by entering students at Mary Washington College. A printed 
statistical class profile is available from the Director of Admissions. 

* A school which is accredited by the state or a regional accredit- 
ing agency. 

**An entrance unit represents a year's successful study of a subject 
in a high school or preparatory school, the class meeting five 
times a week. 



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ADMISSIONS 





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ADMISSIONS 



Information about the tests may be obtained from the College 
Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, N. J., or from 
secondary school counselors. In applying for the tests the applicant 
should specify that the results be sent to Mary Washington College. 

Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age may be 
admitted as special students, provided they give evidence of serious 
purpose and show adequate preparation for a liberal arts program. 
All other applicants must meet the quantitative requirements out- 
lined above. 

Character, Personality and Interests 

A recommendation by an appropriate secondary school official, 
including information about the student's character, interests, 
attitudes, and habits as a member of her school community, is 
required. The school officials are also required to make an assess- 
ment of the applicant's academic promise. Provision for this 
information is made on the reverse side of the transcript form. 
Activities that reflect leadership or intellectual interests are im- 
pressive only if they reinforce sound academic achievement. Since 
Mary Washington operates under a successful honor system, 
assurance of personal integrity is indispensable. 

Health 

Each student before entering the College is required to present 
a certificate from her family physician indicating the results of a 
recent physical examination. If this examination reveals the need 
for further information pertinent to the health and welfare of the 
student, such information should be included with the certificate. 




An up-to-date physical examination is required for each session 
a student attends the College. Although every effort is made to 
mail forms for completing this examination to all readmission 
students as well as freshman and transfer students, it is the responsi- 
bility of the individual student to see that the examination is under- 
taken and the results reported to the College on the appropriate 
form. Normally this form is mailed directly to the student around 
Julyl. 

Committee Review 

The Committee on Admissions examines each application for 
evidence of qualifications appropriate to the purpose of the College 
and approves applicants— including those wishing to enter the five 
cooperative professional programs for which Mary Washington 
provides the liberal arts base— only if they seem prepared to succeed 
in a competitive, liberal curriculum. 

In attempting to judge which applicants are most likely to 
succeed in competition with their fellow students, the Committee 
considers many factors. Among them are academic achievement, 
class rank, aptitude and achievement test results, a pattern of 
courses demonstrating interest and competence in the liberal arts 
and sciences, and secondary school recommendations. 

The Committee feels that the senior year is extremely important, 
and such basic academic subjects as English, mathematics, labora- 
tory sciences, and foreign language, particularly the latter, should 
be continued through the final term. 



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ADMISSIONS 




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ADMISSIONS 



Directions for Application 

Upon request the Director of Admissions will send an applica- 
tion for admission, including a secondary school transcript form. 
The application should be completed and signed by the applicant 
and her parent or guardian and returned directly to the College. 
The transcript blank should be completed by the appropriate 
official of the school from which the applicant has been graduated 
or expects to be graduated and returned to the Director of 
Admissions. 

A non-refundable fee of ten dollars (read carefully, Application 
Fee, page 33) must accompany the application. No applicant 
will be considered by the Committee on Admisions until these 
forms, the appropriate test scores, and the fee have been received. 

Candidates are urged to submit a three-year transcript and 
personal application early in the first semester of the senior year. 
The Committee on Admissions will make a preliminary evaluation 
of this material and will make a final decision upon receipt of 
the first semester grades and the results of the required College 
Board examinations. 

If the student's record is approved and living facilities are 
available, she will be notified of acceptance, usually by April 1. 
Acceptance is for a specific session of the College. If the student 
does not enroll then, she must file a new application. 

Since the residential space is limited, many applicants are unable 
to secure accommodations. No later than the first month of their 
senior year, students interested in applying should request all 
necessary forms from the Director of Admissions. The College 
normally will not accept applications submitted after March 1. 





Early Decision Plan 

Although a final decision regarding acceptance for admission is 
not usually made until after February 1 , the Committee on Ad- 
missions will offer to especially well-qualified applicants the op- 
portunity for an early decision, provided the individual student 
selected is prepared to certify, after notification, that she has not 
applied to another college or that, if other applications have been 
submitted, they will be withdrawn. This statement must be ac- 
companied by a one hundred dollar non-refundable advance room 
deposit. Notifications of Early Decision are made between October 
1 and January 1. While a student may, at the time she submits 
an application, indicate in writing her interest in this plan, it 
should be noted that acceptance on this basis is determined by the 
Committee on Admissions and that this procedure in no way 
obligates a student to submit an application only to Mary Wash- 
ington. It should be emphasized, however, that a preliminary 
review is made of all applications received prior to December 1 
and, on the basis of this review, the Committee offers Early 
Decision admission to qualified candidates. 

This offer in no way handicaps a student who declines in 
order to consider admission to other colleges. The Committee 
on Admissions will process her application according to the usual 
admission procedure, and if she meets eligiblity requirements, 
accept her for admission. 



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ADMISSIONS 




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ADMISSIONS 



The Advanced Placement and the College- Level 
Examination Programs 

A student who has completed one or more college-level courses 
while she is still attending a secondary school may receive college 
credit for this work at Mary Washington College. Those who desire 
to qualify for consideration of credit should take the appropriate 
examination in the Advanced Placement Program of the College 
Entrance Examination Board and have the results forwarded to the 
College. The examinations are offered in the third week of May 
and are provided in American History, Biology, Chemistry, Eng- 
lish, French, European History, German, Latin, Mathematics, 
Physics and Spanish. 

In addition the College participates in the College-Level Examina- 
tion Program, also administered by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. A student may take one or more of the Subject 
Examinations in the series and apply for college credit. Acceptance 
of examination scores in lieu of course work is determined by the 
Dean and the individual departments concerned. 

These examinations may not be substituted for Advanced Place- 
ment examinations, but are intended for demonstrating subject 
matter competency which has been achieved outside of a formally 
structured and administered academic program. 

Further information about either the Advanced Placement 
Examination Program or the College-Level Examination Program 
may be secured from the College Entrance Examination Board, 
Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 




Directions for Read mission 

A student attending the College who expects to return the follow- 
ing session must file an application for readmission. The form is 
mailed to the student in December and must be returned by March 
1 with a ten-dollar application fee and a fifty-dollar advance 
payment. Any student whose completed application form and fees 
are received after March 1 must be placed on a waiting list for 
residential accommodations; the College cannot assure these stu- 
dents that space will be available for the following session. 

The ten-dollar fee is non-refundable; the fifty-dollar advance 
payment, which is applied to the student's account for the 
following session, is not refundable after May 1 unless the student 
is academically or residentially ineligible to return, or except in 
very unusual circumstances, based on the merits of the case as 
determined by the Comptroller. 

Readmission is approved for the session immediately following. 
If a student does not return at this time a subsequent application 
for readmission will be treated as a new application for admission. 

A student who has withdrawn from the College or is suspended 
for other than academic reasons, is not automatically readmitted 
but must make application. If she has attended another insti- 
tution, the work there as well as that done at Mary Washington 
College will be taken into consideration by the Committee on 
Admissions. 

A student who withdraws from the College while on academic 
probation or under suspension for academic deficiency is not 
eligible for readmission. 



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ADMISSIONS 



26 



Although the College makes every effort to furnish read- 
mission applications directly to enrolled students, it is the re- 
sponsibility of the individual student to see that the above regula- 
tions are met. Application forms may be obtained from the 
Director of Admissions. 

Admission by Advanced Standing 

Admission Requirements 

For admission with advanced standing the applicant must satisfy 
the general requirements for admission (See pp 19) and in addition 
meet the following standards: 

An applicant should have earned approximately a "B" average 
in all college-level work. She may be considered only if she is 
entitled to honorable dismissal without academic or residential 
probation in the last institution attended. She must have received 
the recommendation of her dean, director, or other authorized 
administrative officer of her current college. 

An applicant must satisfy the secondary school entrance re- 
quirements at Mary Washington College, using her advanced credits 

for this purpose if necessary. 

ADMISSIONS ^ candidate must submit the results of the Scholastic Aptitude 

Test. Normally, achievement tests are not required, but the 
Committee may request a student to take specific examinations. 

Residence Requirements 

A student must be enrolled at Mary Washington College at 
least four semesters, including the last semester, to be eligible 
for a degree. 

A candidate for a degree must earn at least eighteen hours of 
her major subject at Mary Washington College. 

Students wishing to enroll in one of the cooperative programs, 
such as those in medical technology and speech pathology, must 
be enrolled at Mary Washington College at least four semesters. 
No transfer students are accepted for the cooperative program 
in nursing. 

Directions for Application 

Upon request, the Director of Admissions will send an ap- 
plication for admission, a secondary school transcript form, and 
an Inter-College Confidential Form. The application, signed by the 
applicant and her parent or guardian, should be sent to the College. 



The transcript blank should be completed by the appropriate 
official of the secondary school from which the applicant was 
graduated and returned directly to the Director of Admissions. 

Information requested on the Inter-College Confidential Form 
should be provided by the Dean of Students or other appropriate 
official at the applicant's current college. The applicant should 
request that this, as well as a complete transcript of all course 
work attempted to date, be forwarded to the Director of Ad- 
missions here. 

Applicants are urged to submit a transcript, Inter-College Con- 
fidential Form, and a personal application early in the first semester 
of the year prior to transferring. The Committee on Admissions 
will make a preliminary evaluation of this material and will make 
a final decision upon receipt of the first semester or second 
quarter grades. 

If the applicant's record is approved by the Committee on Ad- 
missions and living facilities are available, the applicant will be 
notified of her acceptance, usually by April 1. Acceptance is for 
a specific session of the College. If the student does not enroll 
then, she must file a new application. 

An application fee of ten dollars (read carefully, Application 
Fee, Page 33) should be sent to the Director of Admissions by 
the applicant. No applicant will be considered for enrollment by 
the Committee on Admissions until the completed application, 
all other forms, and the fee have been received. 



27 



ADMISSIONS 




Transfer of Credits. 

The College will accept credit for work completed at other 
institutions under the following conditions: 
For Transfer Students Admitted With Advanced Stand- 
ing— 

The evaluation and allowance of credits will be provisional 
until the student has completed one semester's work at Mary 
Washington, after which her transfer credits may be subject 
to re-evaluation. Credit is allowed only for courses equivalent 
to courses offered at Mary Washington and only for courses 
which the student has completed with a grade of "C" or better. 
Transfer students must earn a "C" average or better on all work 
taken at Mary Washington and in courses in their major subject. 
Transfer credits do not affect a student's quality point standing 
one way or another. 

For Students Transferring Credits From Other Branches 
of the University of Virginia. 

Quality points will be recorded as earned, but may not be used 
28 to earn special academic honors or to improve a student's academic 

standing. 
ADMISSIONS f or students Already Enrolled At Mary Washington 

College. 

A student wishing to earn credits at another institution, either 
in the summer or during a regular session, must obtain permission 
in writing to do so from the Office of the Dean. Credit for 
courses taken elsewhere will be allowed according to the regula- 
tions stated above. 

Correspondence courses are not credited toward a degree. 
Extension classes may be taken for credit only with permission 
of the Dean and the chairman of the department concerned, and 
under no circumstances may more than thirty hours of extension 
course credit be counted toward a degree. 




Semester Fees And Expenses 

Students Living in Residence Halls 



VIRGINIA 
STUDENTS 



NON-VIRGINIA 
STUDENTS 



Tuition $ None $ 700 

General college fees $ 600 600 

Student activity fee 27 27 

Residential fee 398 398 

Board 385 385 

Total-Session of Nine Months. $1410 $21 10 

Semester Charge Payable 

September 1 and February 1 $705 $1055 

Full- Time Day Students 

VIRGINIA 
STUDENTS 

Tuition $ None 

General college fees $ 600 

Student activity fee 27 

Total— Session of Nine Months . . . (£7 

Semester Charge Payable 

September 1 and February 1 $ 313.50 $ 663.50 



NON-VIRGINIA 
STUDENTS 

$ 700 
600 

27 
$1327 



The fees itemized above are subject to change. 

Off- Campus Teacher Training 

Students participating in the Off-Campus Teacher Training 
Program should contact the Comptroller to discuss the applicable 
fees for this semester of teacher training. 

Contingent Fee 

A contingent fee of $10.00 is charged all full-time students and 
may not be deducted from the charges due on admission to the 
College. Students will be held responsible for the care and preserva- 
tion of College property and, as far as possible, all damage to 
buildings and equipment will be repaired at the expense of stu- 
dents causing such damage. At the end of the session, the whole 
or such part of the contingent fee as may be due the student will 
be returned. 



31 



FINANCES 



Part- Time Students 

The minimum charge for a part-time program (1 to 3 hours' 
credit) is $70.00 per semester. For each semester hour of credit 
over three, there is an additional charge of $23. 00 per credit hour. 
A student who is not a legal resident of the State of Virginia 
will be charged a non-resident tuition fee of $28.00 per semester 
hour of credit in addition to the above charges. 

In addition to the fees above, students enrolling only for 
courses with individual instruction in music or art will be charged 
an additional $50.00 for each such course. 

No student will be admitted on a part-time basis who registers 
for more than ten semester hours of credit. Part-time students are 
not entitled to laundry, infirmary or dining hall services; neither 
are they entitled to free admission to those events covered by the 
Student Activity Fee. 

No student may reside on campus who is enrolled as a part- 
time student. 

Students enrolled for classes for no credit will be charged at 
the same rate as those enrolled for credit. 
32 Students who live off campus can make provisions to take 

meals in the dining hall by notifying the Office of the Comptroller. 

FINANCES The dining hall charges will be billed on a semester basis. Off 

campus students must pay the full board charge as specified on 
page 31. The meal charge cannot be prorated to include only 
one or two meals per day. 

Classification as a Virginia Student 

Title 23, Sec. 7 of the 1950 Code of Virginia states: "No 
person shall be entitled to the admission privileges, or the reduced 
tuition charges, or any other privileges accorded by law only to 
residents or citizens of Virginia, in the State institutions of higher 
learning unless such person has been domiciled in and is and has 
been an actual bona fide resident of Virginia for a period of at 
least one year prior to the commencement of the term, semester 
or quarter for which any such privilege or reduced tuition charge 
is sought, provided that the governing boards of such institutions 
may require longer periods of residence and may set up additional 
requirements for admitting students." 

Classification as a Virginia student, as defined by The Rector 
and Board of Visitors, is as follows: 



In order to be considered a Virginia student for any given 
semester, it is necessary that the applicant, who takes the legal 
residence of her father, shall have been domiciled in the State 
of Virginia for at least one year immediately preceding the beginning 
of that semester, and that the applicant's father must have been 
a bona fied taxpayer (paying income taxes on the father's total 
income) to the State of Virginia for the calendar year immediately 
preceding the calendar year of registration. 

A student who is twenty-one (21) years of age must show 
evidence that she has established residence, and that she has 
declared herself a legal resident of the State of Virginia. 

For tuition purposes, the married student takes the legal resi- 
dence of her husband unless she has shown evidence of establishing 
her legal residence as different from that of her husband. 

Residence in the State for the purpose of securing an education 
does not qualify an individual for classification as a Virginia stu- 
dent. 



Application Fee 

An application fee of $10.00 must accompany every application 
for admission, both from new students and from upperclassmen 
applying for readmission. No admission will be acted upon by 
the Committee on Admissions until this fee has been received. 

This application fee of $10.00 is to be paid by every new 
student whether she lives on or off the campus. It is a payment 
entirely separate from other fees and cannot be deducted from 
charges due on entrance to the College. THIS FEE IS NOT 
REFUNDABLE, but is applied to the cost of processing the 
application for admission. 

Since residence accommodations are limited, making it necessary 
to deny admission to many applicants each year, it is advisable 
to comply with the requirements for admission (see Directions 
for Application, page 22) as far in advance of the opening of the 
session as is practicable. 

Terms of Payment 

All fees, room rent, and board are payable in advance by the 
semester. 

Statements for students' fees and expenses for the first semester 
will be mailed the later part of August. Payment in full is due 
for the first semester by February 1. Scholarships and loans are 
applied one-half to each semester. This credit should appear on 
the statement mailed by the College. 



33 



FINANCES 





Any variations from the terms of payment must be approved in 
writing by the Comptroller prior to the payment dates listed 
above. If student accounts are not paid in full by the required 
date, the account will be subject to a$10.00 late payment penalty. 

Failure to meet payments when due or to make other satisfactory 
arrangements may result in suspension of the student from College 
until the account is brought up to date. 

Remittance should be made to Mary Washington College and 
sent to the Comptroller. 

New Students 

After notification of acceptance from the Director of Admissions, 
a payment of $100.00 is required. No student will be assigned a 
residence hall room until the payment of $100.00 has been re- 
ceived. This payment is not refundable after May 1 , but is applied 
toward the fees for the session immediately following. Exceptions 
to this policy will be made only in the most unusual circum- 
stances, based on the merits of the case as determined by the 
Comptroller and the Director of Admissions. 



34 



FINANCES 



Returning Students 

All students applying for readmission are required to make a $50.00 
advance payment by March 1. This payment is not refundable 
after May 1, except in unusual circumstances, based on the merits 
of the case as determined by the Comptroller. 



Refund of Fees 

Students who withdraw from the College during the semester 
will be charged in accordance with the following schedule: 



Withdrawal 
During Semester 

1-15 days 
15 days— middle of 
semester 



General 
College Fees 

$75.00 
One-half semester 
charge 



Tuition 

$85.00 
One-half semester 
charge 
No refund 



After middle of semester No refund 

After the middle of a semester, no refund of general college 
fees or tuition will be made except in case of personal illness 
and upon recommendation of the College or family physician. 

Residential fee: Except in the first 15 days of the semester, 
no refund of this fee will be made. 

Board: For the purpose of calculating refunds, board will be 
charged at a rate of $1.50 per day for each day in residence. 



Credit 

No credit will be awarded, diploma granted, or transcript of 
credits furnished a student until all financial obligations to the 
College, other than student loans, have been paid or secured by 
other financial arrangements. 

All previously incurred expenses at the College must be paid 
in full or secured before a student may re-enter at the beginning 
of any semester. 

Other Fees 

Riding Fees— For instruction in riding the fees are as follows: 

Two hours a week (recreation only) ., $75.00 each semester 

Four hours a week (recreation or credit) $125.00 each semester 

Unlimited hours (recreation or credit) $150.00 each semester 

Recreational riding on a 

non-scheduled basis $3.00 per hour 

Bills for riding fees are collected by Grey Horse Stables. After 
a student has had one riding class, no refund of fees will be made 
unless a physician certifies that the student is physically unfit or 
the Registrar finds it nesessary to change the student's schedule. 

Academic Costume— Senior students are furnished an academic 

costume for use during their senior year at a cost of $7.00. FINANCES 

Books and Supplies— Books and supplies are available at the 
College Book Store. These cannot be included in a student's 
college account but must be paid for in cash at the time of 
purchase. 

Student Bank— It is suggested that students deposit their personal 
funds in the Student Bank. Deposit books are furnished by the 
College, and personal funds are handled according to savings 
account procedures. The Bank, which is under the jurisdiction 
of the Comptroller's Office, is open at certain hours daily through 
the week. 




Financial Assistance 

Mary Washington is pleased to provide scholarships, loans and 
student employment for deserving young women in need of help 
in meeting their College expenses. To apply for assistance, all 
students must file the Parent's Confidential Statement of the Col- 
lege Scholarship Service with the Director of Financial Aid, 
prior to March 1st of the year they plan to enter. 

Incoming students may obtain these Statements from their high 
schools, or by writing the College Scholarship Service, P. O. Box 
176, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. Action will be taken only on 
applications for those students who have been admitted to the 
College by the Committee on Admissions. 

Students presently attending Mary Washington may obtain their 
Statements from the Office of the Director of Financial Aid. 

Eligibility and Tenure.— Scholarships and loans are awarded to 
full-time students on the basis of character, need, and ability. 
Recipients must maintain good academic standing, a clear dis- 
ciplinary record and, when employed, render satisfactory service. 

Scholarships 

3$ Alpha Psi Omega Scholarship 

The Mary Washington Cast of Alpha Psi Omega awards an 

FINANCES annual scholarship to the junior or senior major in Dramatic 

Arts and Speech who has maintained a high academic average, 
given evidence of need, and made an outstanding contribution 
to dramatics at the College. 

This award of at least $50, given in the spring, will be credited 
to the recipient's account the following session. 

Lalla Gresham Ball Scholarships 

Established by Mrs. Jessie Ball duPont in memory of her mother. 
Applicants for these full scholarships must be residents of one of 
the following counties of Virginia: King George, Westmoreland, 
Northumberland, Richmond, Lancaster, Essex, and King and 
Queen. The scholarships may be renewed annually, provided that 
the student remains in good standing at the College. 

Bayly-Tiffany Scholarships 

These awards, made by the University of Virginia upon our 
recommendation, are for residents of Northampton and Accomac 
Counties. However, if none are eligible from these areas, stu- 
dents from other Virginia counties or the State of Maryland 
may be considered. 

Biology Scholarships 

Through a generous friend of the College, an ample fund to 
provide scholarships in biology has been established. Awards are 



37 



made to outstanding and deserving Mary Washington juniors and 
seniors in biology or bio-chemistry upon recommendation of their 
departmental chairmen. Scholarships are also available to stu- 
dents planning graduate work in these fields elsewhere upon 
completion of their degrees here. 

Lt. General Albert J. Bowley Scholarship Fund 

Established by Mrs. Elsie Ball Bowley in memory of her 
husband, Lt. General Albert J. Bowley, a distinguished officer 
of the United States Army. Consideration is first given to daughters 
of service personnel, and then to students from free foreign 
countries (preferably Latin Americans), or to students whose major 
interests and work lie in the fields of History or Political Science. 
The recipient of this scholarship will devote to the James Monroe 
Memorial Foundation as much of her time and services as the 
authorities of Mary Washington College shall prescribe. 

Miss Lelea Kay Bowling was awarded this Scholarship for the 
1968-69 session. 

Carol E. Casto Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Established this year by Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Casto in 

memory of their daughter, this gift of at least half of the costs 

of the general college and student activities fees will be awarded FINANCES 

annually to a resident of Virginia. Although preference is given 
to applicants from Arlington County, students from other counties 
in Virginia may apply. 

Chancellor's Alumnae Fund 

Established in 1961 by the Mary Washington College Alumnae 
Association. Awards are made at the discretion of the Chancellor 
to students, alumnae, or faculty of Mary Washington College for 
graduate or special study. Please address inquiries to the Director 
of Financial Aid. 

The Chandler Scholarship 

Algernon B. Chandler, President of Mary Washington from 1919 
to 1928, made a bequest of $1,000 to the College. The proceeds 
shall be used toward the education of a junior or senior selected 
on the basis of scholarship, attitude, and need. 

The Hatton Lathrop Clark Scholarship 

Established through the generosity of Mrs. Hatton Lathrop 
Clark, this full scholarship is awarded a Virginia student who, in 
the judgment of the Chancellor, deserves such recognition and has 
genuine financial need. Please address inquiries to the Director 
of Financial Aid. 



Educational Opportunity Grants 

Established by the Higher Education Act of 1965, this federal 
matching fund is designed for students "of exceptional financial 
need, who for lack of financial means of their own or of their 
families would be unable to enter or remain in college without 
an Educational Opportunity Grant." Further information may be 
obtained from the Director of Financial Aid. 

FMC Corporation, American Viscose Division, Award 

The FMC Corporation, American Viscose Division, has granted 
the College $1,000 to be used for scholarships or any other purpose 
the College believes desirable. 



38 



FINANCES 



General Undergraduate Scholarships 

On the basis of financial need, the College offers a number of 
scholarships from $100— $350 for the nine-month session. Applicants 
must be legal residents of Virginia. 

Martin Luther King Memorial Scholarship 

This $500 gift will be awarded to a Virginia resident in her 
freshman year with option of renewal for her sophomore year. 
In addition, she will receive an equal amount from the Educational 
Opportunity Grant to further guarantee her the college education 
she would otherwise be unable to achieve. Please address inquiries 
to the Director of Financial Aid. 




Mu Phi Epsilon Scholarship 

Phi Psi Chapter of Mu Phi Epsilon, National Professional 
Music Sorority, offers an applied music scholarship of $50. 
Majors in music who have reached second-semester freshman 
standing are eligible to apply. 

Minnie Rob Phaup Memorial Scholarship 

This scholarship established in memory of Minnie Rob Phaup, 
formerly of the Mary Washington College faculty , may be awarded 
to a graduating senior in psychology for graduate study in this 
field. 

Annie Fleming Smith Scholarship Fund 

Established by Mrs. Elsie Ball Bowley in memory of Mrs. 
Annie Fleming Smith, whose efforts made possible the preserva- 
tion of Kenmore, the home of George Washington's sister. In 
awarding this scholarship, primary consideration is given to stu- 
dents from the Virginia Northern Neck, consisting of King George, 
Westmoreland, Richmond, Lancaster, and Northumberland 



counties. This recipient will devote to the Kenmore Association 
as much of her time and services as the authorities of Mary 
Washington College shall prescribe. 

The Thomas Howard and Elizabeth Merchant Tardy Endow- 
ment Fund 

Established in 1962 by Mrs. Ida Elizabeth Tardy with an initial 
gift of $1,000. The income from the grant shall be used primarily 
to aid students descended from James R. Tardy and his wife, 
Mary M. Tardy, and from William H. Merchant and his wife, 
Belle Ashby Merchant. 

Mary Washington College Scholarships 

On the basis of financial need and academic achievement, the 
College offers a limited number of scholarships from $100 to 
$300 for the nine-month session. Applicants must be legal residents 
of Virginia. 

O. P. Wright Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Established in 1964 by a bequest from the estate of O. Pendle- 
ton Wright, architect of several buildings at Mary Washington, 
this scholarship is awarded to deserving students with genuine 
financial need. 

Loans 

The National Defense Student Loan Program 

The purpose of the National Defense Student Loan Program 
is to make it possible for worthy students in need of financial 
assistance to obtain a college education. To be eligible, a borrower 
must carry at least half of the normal class load, need the amount 
of the loan, and be capable of maintaining good standing in her 
studies. These loans are available to all students who are citizens 
of the United States. 

While the maximum that may be borrowed for any twelve- 
month period is $1,000, decision on the amount granted rests 
with the Committee on Financial Aid upon review of the Parents' 
Confidential Statement. 

The borrower will sign a note for her loan, and repayment 
begins one year after she graduates or leaves school. Ten years are 
allowed to complete payment. No interest on the loan will 
accrue prior to the beginning of the repayment period , and interest 
thereafter is paid at the rate of three percent per year. In the 
event of the borrower's death or permanent and total disability, 
obligation to repay the loan is cancelled. 




39 



FINANCES 



1 ?V$i - 




40 



FINANCES 




The National Defense Education Act further provides that a 
maximum of fifty percent of the loan (plus interest) may be can- 
celled should the borrower become a full-time teacher in a public 
or non-profit elementary or secondary school. Such cancellation 
is at the rate of ten percent per annum (plus interest) for each 
year of full-time teaching service. 

The College uses the current Parents' Confidential Statement of 
the College Scholarship Service as its application for this and all 
financial assistance. 

State Scholarships for Teachers 

These scholarships are in the nature of loans which are can- 
celled at a fixed rate for each year that the recipient teaches in 
the Virginia public schools after graduation. Applicants must be 
residents of Virginia and meet the qualifications established by 
the State Board of Education. Information and applications may be 
obtained from the Director of Financial Aid. 

Other types of loans are available upon request. 

Student Employment 

The College offers many opportunities for part-time employ- 
ment for qualified students with a "C" average or better. Most 
positions, which include those in the library, residence halls, 
dining hall and faculty offices, pay from approximately $350 
to $500 for the nine-month session. For information and ap- 
plications, please address inquiries to the Office of Student Em- 
ployment, Box 1341. 



mm 



'' ; %s«fi?* : 



kf"l0 



The Student and the College 

Mary Washington, like most colleges, has its own way of life. 
It is important, therefore, that prospective students and their 
parents become familiar with its purposes and objectives before 
submitting applications for admission. 

Mary Washington College is committed to the ideals of in- 
dividual responsibility and the pursuit of excellence, and it is 
felt that these ideals are best achieved when conditions of demo- 
cratic tradition and a high standard of personal honor exist. 
For this reason, the Student Government Association and the 
Honor System play vital roles in student life at Mary Washington 
College. 

In this context students are encouraged to make decisions for 
themselves concerning the day-to-day conduct of their life at the 
College. The students are expected to live under regulations pre- 
scribed by the Student Government Association and are bound to 
maintain a high standard of personal and academic conduct by 
the self-imposed— and self-regulated— Honor System. 

The College strives to create and maintain an atmosphere of 
friendliness and helpfullness on the part of students and faculty. 
It is expected that students will at all times uphold the standards, 
traditions, and regulations of the College and that parents will 
cooperate in these matters. A student is likewise held responsible 
for the conduct of her guests on campus. 

Insofar as possible, the College shares with parents or guardians 
the responsibility of helping the student to uphold the standards 
and abide by the regulations of the institution. The fact that a 
student is of legal age or is paying her own expenses in no way 
alters this relationship. 

The College administration reserves the right to request any 
student to withdraw whose conduct or general attitude is considered 
unsatisfactory, even though no specific charge is made against her. 



43 

STUDENT 

LIFE 




44 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



Student Government Association 

The Student Government Association is composed of the entire 
student body. Its purpose is to promote personal responsibility, 
loyalty, and a high sense of honor in the individual student, and 
to represent and further the best interests of the student body and 
the College by inculcating the underlying principles of self- 
government and democracy. 

The Association has executive, legislative, and judicial branches, 
each with clearly defined duties and responsibilities, and each an 
integral and vital part of the governmental process. The constitu- 
tion of the Association is designed to involve the greatest number 
of students possible in the governmental process, making it more 
essential to the conduct of student affairs. 

As prescribed by the constitution, legislative powers are delegated 
to a representative student senate, which also has jurisdiction 
over most of the SGA committees. The position of the SGA 
President is defined by the document as the chief executive of 
the Student Government Association and as the direct link between 
the students and the administration of the College. Designated 
to assist the President in fulfilling the executive responsibilities 
is an Executive Cabinet consisting of the vice-president, judicial 
chairman, secretary, and treasurer, plus three ex-officio student 
members. 

Judicial responsibilities on the campus are shared by the in- 
dividual residence halls and a joint council, consisting of students 
and faculty members. In addition, there is a campus review court 
authorized to hear appeals on judicial matters. Other residential 
matters and the coordination of residence hall activities are dealt 
with by a campus residential council. 

A Student Handbook containing the constitution, a detailed 
outline of the Student Government Association organization 
and responsibilities, and student and administrative regulations is 
given to each student at the beginning of each college year. The 
new student is further acquainted with these rules and with the 
Honor System in orientation groups sponsored by the Student 
Government Association and the Honor Council in the first week 
of the session. 

In addition to the responsibilities specifically designated by 
the SGA constitution, students are afforded an opportunity to 
play an active role in the decision-making process at the College 
by serving on various campus-wide committees dealing with 
academic, social, cultural and community affairs. 



The Honor System 

The Honor System is a moral code of personal integrity at 
Mary Washington College. It belongs to the students, who derive 
their authority and responsibility from the Board of Visitors 
of the University of Virginia. Because students are responsible 
for deciding when a breach of honor has been committed, the 
enforcement of the Honor System is in their hands. 

Each student as a member of the student body at Mary Wash- 
ington has the responsibility, not only for familiarizing herself 
with the provisions of the Honor Code upon which the student 
body has agreed, but also for developing within herself the highest 
and strongest personal honor code possible. Each student must 
realize that by accepting admission to Mary Washington, she has 
acknowledged her commitment to the provisions of the Honor 
Code. When she signs the Honor Pledge Card, she is committing 
herself to support the Honor System. She is stating that she under- 
stands it, and realizes that a plea of ignorance is never acceptable. 

The Honor System provides that a student shall act honorably 
in all relationships of campus life. Lying, cheating, stealing, or 
breaking one's word of honor are considered infringements of the 
Honor System. Whenever a violation of the Honor System is 
proved, the result will always be immediate and permanent separa- 
tion from the College. The pledge in classes on quizzes, ex- 
aminations, written problems, and exercises means that the work 
which the student hands in to her professor is her own, which she 
herself has done in accordance with the requirements for the course 
as laid down by the professor. The pledge is as follows: "I 
hereby declare upon my word of honor that I have neither given 
nor received help on this work." The faculty cooperates in es- 
tablishing a clear understanding of these requirements. In any 
case of doubt as to the nature or extent of a pledge, the student 
should immediately request that the professor in charge make 
the requirement perfectly clear to the entire class. 

Every student entering the College for the first time is given 
a copy of the complete Code of the Honor System and she is 
expected to familiarize herself with its provisions. Orientation 
counsellors work to interpret the Honor System to every new 
student before she is asked to sign a pledge stating that she under- 
stands what is expected of her and that she realized that a plea 
of ignorance will not be accepted by the Honor Council. Regis- 
tration as a student in the College is not considered to have been 
completed until this card has been signed. No grades or credits 
will be released unless the signed Honor Pledge Card is on file. 



45 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



46 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



The Honor Council is only a judicial body designed for trial 
purposes of specific cases brought to it by a student regarding 
possible violation of the Honor Code. It has no responsibility 
for discovering guilt before an accusation has been made. The 
Honor Council shall consist of a President and eight class 
representatives. The President shall be elected by the student body 
by secret ballot on the basis of a simple majority of the votes 
cast. The eight Honor Council Representatives, two elected 
respectively from each of the four classes by a simple majority 
of the votes cast, will comprise the voting members of the Honor 
Council. The Honor Council President is not a voting member 
and during a trial, she shall serve only in the capacity of chairman. 

The Honor Pledge Card that each student must sign to complete 
matriculation at the College reads as follows: 

"I, as a student and a citizen of Mary Washington College, 
do hereby resolve to uphold the honor of the College by re- 
fraining from giving or receiving academic material in a manner 
not authorized by the instructor; from the illegal appropriation 
of the property of others; and from the deliberate falsification 
of facts. I shall do all in my power at all times to create a spirit 
of honesty and honor for its own sake, both by upholding the 
Honor System myself and by helping others to do so. 

"I understand the Honor System and realize that a plea of 
ignorance will not be accepted by the Honor Council." 




Residential Life 

The majority of Mary Washington College students are required 
to live in college housing. Two exceptions are permitted: (1) 
students with senior status, who are in good standing academically, 
financially, residentially, and socially, and are not the recipients 
of financial assistance (excluding student aid and state teachers 
scholarships) may with the consent of their parents reside off 
campus; and (2) students may live in their homes or with an 
immediate relative. Off-campus arrangements with immediate rela- 
tives must be approved by the Office of the Dean of students. 
All students living off campus will be regarded officially as day 
students. 

Regulations concerning the residence halls are contained in the 
Student Handbook. Students may occupy their rooms on the 
dates specified by the College calendar. Accommodations are 
provided for the students who wish to remain on campus during 
the Thanksgiving and Spring vacations, but no residence hall or 
dining room facilities are available during the Christmas holidays. 

Room assignments for incoming students are made by the Office 
of the Dean of Students. Students presently enrolled in the College 
are allowed to make their room reservations for the next session 
on a designated day in the spring. A student must have completed 
the re-admission procedure before she can reserve a room. 

Social Life 

An active social program is planned at Mary Washington College 
each year in an effort to provide events and activities to be de- 
sired and enjoyed by as many students as possible. 

The social calendar for the year includes receptions, dances, 
teas and mixers; programs by the departments, such as music, 
dramatics, and physical education; lectures by visiting lecturers; 
concerts by guest artists; and regularly scheduled moving pictures, 
both foreign and American. 




47 



STUDENT 
LIFE 



Drama Series 

The Department of Dramatic Arts and Speech annually presents 
at least three major productions and a student-directed children's 
play. In selecting the plays to be presented consideration is given 
to providing the students a varied and balanced drama season 
and to best utilizing the talents of the drama majors. During the 
1968-69 school session there were performances of Major Barbara 
by George Bernard Shaw, Tartuffe by Moliere, and Electra by 
Euripides. 



Dances 

In the course of the year there are at least three formal dances, 
two of them open to the entire student body; the third sponsored 
by the Junior Class. In addition to the formal dances, there are 
occasional informal dances and mixers throughout the year. 



48 



STUDENT 
LIFE 




Concerts 

A varied concert series is planned each year to include both 
visiting artists and student and faculty performances. A number 
of major concerts are scheduled each year featuring programs by 
symphony orchestras, vocal and instrumental artists, and dramatic 
groups. During the 1968-69 school year, for example, performances 
were given at Mary Washington College by The Goldovsky Opera 
Company, actor Arnold Moss, Jose Molina's "Bailes Espanoles," 
pianist Philippe Entremont, and the U. S. Naval Academy Glee 
Club. 

In addition to guest performers, there are presentations by 
faculty and student members of the Department of Music. Each 
year there is a Winter Band Concert and Christmas and Spring 
Choral Concerts, plus several student and general recitals. 

Art Exhibitions 

Each year the College holds a number of art exhibitions in- 
cluding at least one major exhibition and a student exhibition. 
These shows are held in the duPont Galleries located in the Fine 
Arts Center. The major exhibitions are usually of a magnitude 
to attract visitors from throughout the state and feature works 
of note in art circles. During the 1968-69 school session, for ex- 
ample, the College presented an exhibition of the works of Teruo 
Hara, a noted ceramist and a Visiting Artist at the College. In 
1967-68 the College sponsored a rare public exhibition of U.S. 
Senator Hugh Scott's collection of Tang Dynasty art. 

The student exhibition is usually held at the end of the year 
and provides an opportunity for student artists to display what 
they have done during the school term. It also gives the College a 
chance to recognize outstanding achievement in the studio arts 
with the presentation of awards. 

Other Events 

Two segments of the Department of Health, Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation also present special programs each year. The 
Terrapin Club (a synchronized swimming club) presents an ex- 




hibition in the fall and a show in the spring. The Mary Washing- 
ton Dance Company each year presents a dance concert. 

In addition to these special events there are numerous inter- 
class and club parties and functions and other group activities 
in which a student may participate if she so desires. 

Religious Life 

As a non-sectarian institution recognizing the religious freedom 
of the students, Mary Washington College makes no attempt 
to project into their lives the views of any one faith. The churches 
in Fredericksburg, representing most of the denominations, extend 
a cordial welcome to the students, who are encouraged to associate 
themselves with some church. 

A number of the denominations have organizations on campus. 
In cooperation with the local churches these groups promote the 
welfare of their members through frequent meetings for discussion, 
devotions, or social activities. 

The various religious organizations include: The Baptist Stu- 
dent Union, the Episcopal Students, Student Religious Liberals 
(associated with the Unitarian Fellowship), the Lutheran Student 
Association, the Newman Movement, the Christian Science Or- 
ganization, Hillel, the Wesley Foundation, and the Westminster 
receive the tetanus toxoid during the summer before entrance. 

There are three full-time church counsellors provided by their 
respective denominations (Baptist, Methodist, and Presbyterian), 
who direct centers adjacent to the campus. The College is not 
responsible for their programs but cooperates with the counsellors 
through the Office of the Dean of Students. 

There is also a chapter of the Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion (YWCA) on the campus. The YWCA sponsors campus- 
wide religious concerns programs periodically and directs the annual 
World University Service (WUS) drive. 



49 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



50 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



Health Program 

Mary Washington College is interested in the prevention of 
illness and the promotion of a high standard of health in its 
student body. 

The College is concerned with conditions affecting student 
health in order that all cases of illness may be given proper care; 
that the incidence and spread of contagious deseases may be re- 
duced to the lowest terms; and that the general working effi- 
ciency and living standards of the students may be maintained at 
a high level. 

Every student is required each year to present a certificate 
from her family physician indicating the results of a recent 
physical examination. This examination should be made not more 
than two months prior to the beginning of the session. Under no 
circumstances will a student be assigned to a room or allowed to 
register for classes until this completed medical form is on file. 

If this examination reveals information pertinent to the health 
and welfare of the student, such information should be included 
with the certificate. It is strongly recommended that all students 
receive the tetanus toxoid during the summer before entrance. 

The medical fee for students living in the residence halls covers 
the charges for services of the medical and nursing staff of the 
College and for time spent in the College Infirmary as a patient. 

Every student is required to participate in some form of physi- 
cal education which is in keeping with the condition and parti- 
cular physical needs of the individual. Special guidance is provided 
for those with physical handicaps. 

A complete program of intramural activities is provided, some 
of which are hockey, basketball, tennis, swimming, golf, lacrosse, 
bowling, fencing, dancing, archery, riding, and volleyball. 



Specialists, Private Nursing, Etc. 

The College does not assume responsibility for the cost of 
services of specialists or private nurses, or for special prescrip- 
tions, operations, or fees in the local hospital. 

A daily report is made by the Infirmary to the Dean of Stu- 
dents. In cases of severe illness or accident, the parents or guard- 
ians are informed promptly. 

Mary Washington Hospital in the City of Fredericksburg 
provides all modern facilities, including the services of specialists 
in all branches of medical science. A student is often referred to 
the hospital for diagnostic purposes and when the illness is too 
serious for her to remain in the College Infirmary. 



Health Regulations 

1. Students living in their own homes are not entitled to the 
services of the infirmary or College medical nursing staff. 

2. It is necessary to obtain an excuse through the College infir- 
mary for any absence from class on account of illness. 

3. The College calendar should be referred to in making out-of- 
town medical and dental appointments so that such engage- 
ments will not involve leaving early or entering late at holidays. 

4. A student ill enough to be in bed should not remain in a 
residence hall, but should be in the infirmary where she can 
have proper care. No meals are served in the residence hall 
rooms. 

5. Students detained at home because of illness should notify 
the College infirmary immediately upon their return to the 
campus. 

6. Students who have been exposed to any infectious disease 
must report to the College Physician before attending classes 
or mingling with other students. 

7. A consulting physician may be called at the request of either 
the student or her parents or guardian; this is to be done 
through the College Physician or the Nurse. 

Special Services and Opportunities 

There are a number of special services and opportunities avail- 
able at Mary Washington College aimed at complementing the 
formal education a student receives and offering assistance to the 
student who desires it. These services are available to every student 
on a voluntary basis. 



51 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



Guidance and Counselling 

The College attempts to provide adequate guidance and counselling 
without taking from the student the responsibility for making her 
own decisions. A Faculty Committee on Academic Counselling 
and Guidance helps to establish policies in this area. 



Faculty Adviser 

Upon her arrival at Mary Washington College, each new student 
is assigned a faculty adviser, who, as far as possible, is an 
instructor in the field of the student's major interest. The adviser 
helps the student with her program of studies and is available for 
regular consultation throughout the year. Freshmen in particular 
are urged to maintain close contact with their advisers. 



52 

STUDENT 
LIFE 




Ordinarily the student retains the same adviser during her 
sophomore year, but she may change at any time upon request. As 
an upperclass student she will be under the direction of the 
chairman of her major department or someone designated by him 
at the time she receives permission to major. 

Students are also invited to seek advice from the various deans, 
and members of the faculty, and also from residence hall directors. 
Although no sharp distinction is made, students usually confer 
with those in the Offices of the Dean of Students and the Director 
of Student Affairs on matters concerning personal and social life, 
and with the Dean or Associate Dean on academic matters. 



Counselling Center 

For special problems the College offers to its students psycho- 
logical services on a full-time basis. Testing is available for 
the assessment of aptitude, interest, and personality patterns as 
they relate to academic and career-oriented questions and plans. 
The Counseling Center also receives students (for the most part 
self-referred) who present problems in personal, emotional, and 
social adjustment. The facilities of the Counseling Center are 
provided by the College on a non-fee basis and with complete 
assurance of confidentiality. 



Placement Bureau 

The Placement Bureau offers an advisory and placement service 
to graduates and prospective graduates seeking employment. 
A folder of detailed information is compiled for each graduate, 
and an effort is made to give as complete a picture as possible 
of the candidates qualifications. 

Business executives, personnel directors, school superintendents, 
and others interested in employing graduates are invited to visit 
the College, consult the credentials compiled by the Bureau, and 
interview applicants. Confidential reports giving a full and ac- 
curate estimate of each applicant will be furnished on request of 
a prospective employer. 



College Theatre 

The College Theatre is an integral part of the Department of 
Dramatic Arts and Speech and affords students the opportunity to 
appear before the public in major productions of plays by the 
world' s great authors , and to gain practical experience in the various 
phases of theatrical production. 

The Department of Dramatic Arts and Speech requires that all 
students engaged in the activities of the department and its 
organizations maintain at least a "C" average. Any student not 
maintaining this average during the current semester or preceding 
semester will not be allowed to participate in the activities. 

Also available in duPont Hall is a radio broadcasting work- 
shop, with studios and a control room. 



53 



STUDENT 
LIFE 



Language Houses and Laboratories 

Brent Hall and Marye Hall are language houses for students of 
French and Spanish respectively. In addition, one or more suites 
in appropriate residence halls may be reserved for German 
majors. With the guidance of staff members from the Depart- 
ment of Modern Foreign Languages, students engage in a syste- 
matic development of fluency in the oral use of the language. 
Seminar-type meetings, visiting speakers, and the social and cul- 
tural activities of the language clubs, which are centered in these 
houses, give additional opportunities for acquiring facility in speak- 
ing. Major students must be given first consideration, but there 
is generally room for other students who have the necessary 
language proficiency, which is usually attained after completion 
of an intermediate course. 





54 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



The Department of Modern Foreign Languages operates two 
thirty-booth listen-record-listen laboratories, which are open for 
class sections under the regular instructor. Under the direction 
of a specially trained staff member, with student assistants, the 
laboratories are open several hours a day as a library facility 
for individual use. Members of beginning and intermediate classes 
are expected to spend considerable time in the laboratory on their 
oral assignments, dictation exercises, and pronunciation. Students 
on more advanced levels also use the laboratories. 

Field Trips and Tours 

In addition to the regular program of instruction, the College 
sponsors visits to the local shrines and other places of interest, 
including those in the immediate vicinity of Fredericksburg, in 
Washington, D. C, Richmond, and other places easily accessible. 
The air-conditioned college bus offers transportation to concerts and 
plays, and to historic sites such as Stratford and Williamsburg. 

The chairmen of various academic departments have charge of 
the trips or tours used to supplement class instruction. These, 
also made in the college bus, reinforce the work in history, art, 
music, geology, and other fields. Students are able to attend con- 
ventions, visit other educational institutions, and take advantage 
of the cultural facilities in nearby cities. 

Art students visit the galleries in Washington and Richmond, 
music students attend musical events, students in dramatics attend 
plays, and students in economics and political science are able to 
visit government or legislative sessions in these two capital cities. 
Students in psychology and sociology go to such institutions as 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington and the Western State 
Hospital in Staunton. Trips of a general cultural nature are 
often open to any interested undergraduates. 



Clubs and Organizations 

There are a number of honorary fraternities, scholastic and 
professional societies, departmental clubs, and other student organi- 
zations. Although course work is of primary interest to the student 
at Mary Washington, many find time and energy to devote to 
these other activities. All organizations are under the supervision 
of the student Inter-Club Association in cooperation with the 
Office of the Dean of Students and the Student Government 
Association. There are no social sororities at the College. 

Honorary Organizations 

There are honorary fraternities or scholastic societies for al- 
most every discipline pursued at Mary Washington College. In 
addition to these special interest honor groups there is a chapter 
of Mortar Board, the national honorary organization for senior 
women, which taps outstanding juniors on the basis of leadership, 
scholarship, and service to the College. 

The national honorary groups with chapters at Mary Washing- 
ton College include: Alpha Phi Sigma (scholastic), Alpha Psi Omega 
(dramatic), Chi Beta Psi (science), Eta Sigma Phi (classics), 
Mu Phi Epsilon (music), Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics), 
Phi Sigma Iota (Romance Languages), Pi Gamma Mu (social 
sciences), Phi Chi (psychology), and Zeta Phi Eta (professional 
speech arts). Sigma Omega Chi (sociology) and Sigma Tau Chi 
(economics) are local honorary organizations, and there is an 
English Honorary Fraternity. 



55 

STUDENT 
LIFE 




i ii^lsg it§ ^b^iril 




56 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



Departmental and Other Clubs 

A number of departmental or general clubs and organizations 
offer activities in which students with special interests may 
participate. These include: Der Deutsche Verein, El Club Espanol, 
the Italian Club, Le Cercle Francais, the College Chorus and 
Concert Band, the Mary Washington Players, PiNuChi (nursing), 
Mu Alpha Chi (medical technology and pre- medical), the Organ 
Guild, the Student Education, the Day Students' Club, Inter- 
national Relations Club, Mike Club, Oriental Club, Physical 
Therapy Club, Psychology Club, Sociology Club, Science (Matthew 
Fontaine Maury) Club, and the Young Democrats and Young 
Republicans. 

Recreational Association 

In addition to the organized activities listed above, there are 
several campus-wide events each year that are planned by the 
Recreation Association to promote wholesome activity and recrea- 
tion. The Association also sponsors five additional clubs: the Hoof 
Prints, Fencing, Physical Education, Outing, and Terrapin Clubs. 



Student Publications 

There are three student publications on the campus: The 
Bullet, the College newspaper published weekly; The Epaulet, 
a literary magazine published quarterly; and The Battlefield, the 
College yearbook. The Student Handbook is issued by the Stu- 
dent Government Association in cooperation with the Office of 
the Dean of Students. 




Academic 
Information 






m 




rr* 




Organization 

Semester Plan 

The College is organized on the semester plan, and students 
may enter at the beginning of either semester. (See College 
Calendar.) Beginning sections of certain basic courses are offered 
in the second semester. Students who enter the second semester 
in February are given special orientation to help them adjust 
readily to the College. 

Summer Session 

The Summer Session is an integral part of the school year. The 
courses offered have the same credit and the same standard of 
work as those offered in the regular session. Classes are offered 
Monday through Friday. 

Although the majority of students spend four years in college, 
the work for a degree at Mary Washington College can be com- 
pleted in three calendar years by attendance at three general 
sessions and three summer sessions. It is possible to complete 
a semester's work in each of three courses by attending the eight- 
week term. A vacation period of five weeks comes between the 
close of the summer session and the beginning of the fall semester. 

High school graduates who would normally enter college in 
September may begin with the summer session in June and com- 
plete a substantial portion of the first semester's work before the 
fall term. 



59 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 




60 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Terminology 

Semester Hours.— All credit toward graduation is calculated in 
semester hours. A semester hour represents one hour of class 
instruction (or two hours of laboratory work) a week for one 
semester, or approximately eighteen weeks. A college course that 
meets three times a week for a semester carries three semester 
hours credit. A course that meets three times weekly throughout 
the session (two semesters) carries six semester hours credit. 

Required Course.— A course that every candidate for a degree 
must complete, regardless of the subject in which she plans to 
major. It is recommended that all required courses be completed 
during the freshman and sophomore years. 

Major Program.— A field of concentration or specialization to 
which a student devotes a large proportion of her program of 
studies in the junior and senior years. Usually, a major program 
consists of 24 semester hours in the major subject (in addition 
to any credits that may be included in the general requirements 
for graduation) and 12 semester hours in related fields. 

Elective.— A course not specifically required for a degree or 
for the major program which the student is following. 

Course.— Subject or portion of a subject as outlined in this 
bulletin for the session or for a semester. 

Quality Point.— A numerical measure of the student's progress 
toward a degree, awarded on the basis of grades earned. The 
number of quality points must be at least twice the number of 
semester hours attempted. 

Unit.— A basis for evaluating high school work. A unit rep- 
resents a minimum of five 40-minute periods of class work a 
week for at least 36 weeks. 



Academic Regulations 

Classification of Students 

Freshmen.— Students with fewer than 28 semester hours of credit. 
Sophomores.— Students with from 28 to 57 semester hours of 
credit. 
Juniors.— Students with from 58 to 89 semester hours of 
credit. 

Seniors.— Students with as many as 90 semester hours of 
credit. 

Specials.— Students enrolled at the college who are not con- 
sidered degree candidates. 



Student Load 



A student should plan her class schedule carefully each semester 
in consultation with her faculty adviser, taking care both to ensure 
normal progress toward graduation and to avoid too heavy 
an academic load. The faculty adviser must approve the student's 
schedule before she completes her registration. 

In her first year of college, a student should register for not 
less than fourteen or more than seventeen credit hours a semester. 
After the first year she should ordinarily carry from fifteen to 
eighteen credit hours a semester. 

No student living in a College residence hall during the regular 
session may carry less than twelve semester hours without per- 
mission from the Dean of the College. 

Excess Hours 

Only in exceptional circumstances will a student be allowed 
to carry excess hours (more than seventeen hours the first year, 
more than eighteen hours after the first year). Permission to carry 
excess hours must be obtained from the Dean of the College. 

Change of Schedule or Courses 

A student's academic program and schedule of classes must 
be approved each semester by her faculty adviser. After it has 
been reviewed and accepted by the Registrar, a schedule may not 
be changed without permission. 

A student wishing to make a change should consult her faculty 
adviser and get his written permission to drop or add any course. 
During the first week of the semester she must present this per- 
mission to the Registrar's Office; after the first week she must 
present it to the Dean or Associate Dean of the College for 
approval. 

No credit is allowed for a course for which the student has 
not officially registered and which is not listed on the class schedule 
filed in the Registrar's Office. No course may be added after 
the first three weeks of classes. 

If a course is dropped after the first three weeks of a semester, 
a grade of "F" will be recorded unless the instructor certifies 
that the student was passing at the time of withdrawal. An 
exception to this rule may be made for extended absence because 
of illness. If a course is dropped during the last three weeks of 
classes, a grade of "F" will be recorded. 

A student dropping out of a course without permission will 
automatically receive a grade of "F". 



61 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Class Attendance 



62 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Regular class attendance is expected of all students except in 
case of illness or other emergency. Students are responsible for 
the material covered in a course whether they are present or not. 

Request to be absent or explanations for absence from class 
should be made to the instructor teaching the course, except in 
the case of final examinations, which must be taken according 
to schedule unless specifically excused by the Office of the Dean. 

AH excuses for absence must be submitted within three days 
after the absence has occurred. 

Absences from class immediately preceding or following a holiday 
are especially discouraged. Students should consult the college 
calendar in making plane and train reservations. Students are not 
permitted to shift classes or examinations to expedite leaving the 
College for the weekend, holidays, or any other purpose. 

Medical excuses for both residential and day students must 
be submitted to the College Infirmary, which will make a report 
to the Registrar's Office for transmission to each instructor. 

No student may receive credit for a course in which she has 
missed more than one-fourth of the class meetings, regardless of 
the reason. 

Students whose class attendance is unnecessarily irregular may 
be requested to withdraw from the College. 




- , . 




Grading 

A student's class performance determines the final grade in any 
course. Class performance is based on the quality of a student's 
work as indicated by recitation grades, written tests, examinations, 
laboratory work or term papers. 

Scholarship standing is indicated as follows: 

"A" is given for work of unusual excellence. 

"B" is given for work distinctly above average. 

"C" denotes work of average or medium quality. 

"D" is the lowest passing mark and represents work of below 
average quality. 

"E" denotes unsatisfactory work in which a condition has 
been incurred. When the condition is removed, a grade of "D" 
is recorded. Conditions not made up by the end of the following 
semester automatically become "F." 

"Inc." Incomplete. Incomplete work not made up by the end 
of the following semester automatically becomes "F." 

"F" denotes failure and requires that the subject be taken again 
and passed before credit can be allowed. 

"P" Pass. This indicates that the course requirement has been 
successfully met. 

"S" Satisfactory. This indicates that the course requirement has 
been successfully met. 

"U" Unsatisfactory. This means that the requirement has not 
been successfully met and an additional course must be taken. 

Credits earned with a grade of "P" or "S" count towards 
graduation but carry no quality points. 

Pass/ Fail.— With adviser approval a student may take one 
course each semester, for elective credit only, on a Pass/ Fail 
basis. She must register as a Pass/ Fail student by the end of the 
initial three- week drop- add period. After that time no change in 
status is permitted. Pass/ Fail credits are not averaged in deter- 
mining a student's quality-point ratio and only "P" or "F" 
will be recorded on her transcript. The credit hours earned, how- 
ever, will always be counted. 



63 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



64 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Scholarship Quality Points 

A candidate for a degree must have earned twice as many 
quality points as semester hours attempted before being permitted to 
graduate. This means, in general, that the work of the student 
must be equal at least to an average grade of "C." Courses taken 
in the major subject in fulfillment of the major program require- 
ments must also average at least "C." 

The following Quality Point system enables students to keep 
constant check on their standing, and to know at all times 
whether or not they are maintaining the overall "C" average 
required by the College. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "A" four 
quality points are allowed. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "B" three 
quality points are allowed. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "C" two quality 
points are allowed. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "D" one quality 
point is allowed. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "P" no quality 
point is allowed or required. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "S" no quality 
point is allowed or required. 

In each case the number of semester hours credit in each 
course is multiplied by the number of quality points assigned to 
the grade earned in that course. For example, "A" in a course 
for which three semester hours credit are allowed entitles the stu- 
dent to twelve quality points. In this same course a grade of "B" 
would entitle the student to nine quality points, "C" to six 
quality points, and "D" to three quality points. No quality 
points are earned for grades of "F," "P," "S," or "incom- 
plete." 

A permanent record of quality points earned as well as semester 
hours attempted and earned is kept in the Registrar's Office. 
This information is available to students and parents at all times. 



Reports, Deficiencies and Failures 

Regular reports are mailed to students and parents at the end 
of each semester. In addition to the semester grades, notice is 
given of cumulative totals in the number of hours attempted, 
hours passed, and quality points earned. 

Students and parents are also notified of unsatisfactory or 
deficient work in the middle of each semester. In this way, stu- 



dents are given every opportunity and encouragement to make 
up deficiencies or probable failures before the end of the semester. 

Students with academic deficiencies are urged to make every 
effort to remove them. In order to graduate, it is necessary 
for the student to maintain a general average of at least "C" 
and also an average of at least "C" on courses taken in the 
major subject to satisfy the major program requirements. 

The Dean of the College and the Associate Dean are ready at 
all times to confer with students or parents regarding academic 
problems. 



Repeating A Course 

Courses may be repeated only with permission from the Office 
of the Dean. (1) If a student repeats and passes a course which 
she previously has failed, then her record will be credited with 
the hours passed and the additional quality points; however, she 
will not be charged with any additional hours attempted. (2) 
If a student repeats for quality points a course she has already 
passed, her record will be charged with no additional hours at- 
tempted or hours passed, but the quality points earned on the 
second grade for the course will be substituted for the quality 
points originally earned in the course. 







65 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Academic Probation and Suspension 



66 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Probation 

In general, a student is placed on academic probation if she 
is not making satisfactory progress toward graduation. 

1. In terms of credit hours a student will be placed on academic 
probation if 

a. in any semester, including the first, she fails more than 
four semester hours work; 

b. in any semester she receives grades of D, E, or F 
on more than 7 semester hours of work, regardless of 
her total number of hours or quality points; 

c. at the end of her freshman year she has fewer than 28 
semester hours; 

d. at the end of her third semester she has fewer than 
43 semester hours; 

e. at the end of her sophomore year she has fewer than 
58 semester hours; 

f. at the end of her fifth semester she has fewer than 
73 semester hours; 

g. at the end of her junior year she has fewer than 90 
semester hours. 

2. In terms of quality points a student will be placed on 
probation if 

a. at any time during her first five semesters she falls more 
than 1 1 quality points below twice the number of hours 
she has attempted; 

b. at the end of her sixth or seventh semester she does 
not have twice as many quality points as hours attempted. 




Suspension 

A student will be suspended if 

1. at any time after the end of the first semester she falls 
more than 6 credit hours below the minimum standards 
set forth in section 1 under Probation; 

2. she falls more than 19 quality points below twice the num- 
ber of hours she has attempted; 

3. at the end of her sixth or seventh semester she falls more 
than 9 quality points below twice the number of hours 
she has attempted; 

4. she incurs probation for a third time. (For reinstatement 
after suspension, see the Catalogue, p. 25.) 




As previously noted, a student may be placed on probation 
or suspended for either a semester hour or quality point de- 
ficiency. Under usual circumstances a student will not be granted 
probationary status for more than two semesters. A student who 
is suspended for the first time may be readmitted on probation 
by earning in the summer school of this College at least eight 
semester hours and sixteen quality points. A student seeking such 
reinstatement must do so ordinarily in the summer session im- 
mediately following the academic suspension. 



67 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Withdrawal 
Voluntary Withdrawal 

A student wishing to withdraw from the College must have 
advance consent of her parent or guardian if she is a minor and 
must inform the Dean of Students in any case. 
Enforced Withdrawal 

Students who are persistently neglectful of duty or who con- 
tinuously fail to meet the academic and social standards of the 
College may be asked to withdraw or not to return to Mary 
Washington. 
Marriage 

A student entering into marriage prior to college enrollment or 
during attendance at college (including summer and other vacation 
periods) is ineligible to remain in residence except with special 
permission. Any change in status must be discussed personally 
and in advance with the Dean of Students. Each case is con- 
sidered on its individual merits. 




Recognition of Academic Achievement 

The Dean's List 

A student who attains a grade point average of 3.50 or better 
for any semester with no grade below "C" is placed on the Dean's 
List of Honor Students. 

Intermediate and Final Honors 

A junior at Mary Washington College who has achieved a 
3.75 grade-point average in her freshman and sophomore years 
is awarded "Intermediate Honors" at the Chancellor's Convoca- 
tion held during the first week of the session. 

Similarly, a student who attains a 3.75 grade-point average in 
her junior and senior years is awarded "Final Honors" at the 
graduating exercises held at the end of the session. 



68 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Academic Distinction 

General academic attainment of graduating seniors will be 
recognized through the awards of Distinction, High Distinction 
and Highest Distinction, based solely on the student's academic 
average at Mary Washington College. The level of attainment for 
each award shall be as follows: Distinction: 3.25; High Distinction: 
3.50; Highest Distinction: 3.75. A student may receive both Honors 
in her department and one of the Distinction awards. 

Honors Work 

A student who has maintained a grade point average of 3.25 
in her major and related fields and a general grade point average 
of 3.0 during five semesters and who has shown ability for in- 
dependent study, may apply for permission to do honors work 
in her senior year. This project is equivalent to six semester hours 
(eight semester hours in the laboratory sciences) of course work 
in the major and may be carried on in an advanced seminar or 
under individual supervision by a faculty member, according to 
the decision of the Committee on Honors of the department con- 
cerned. 

To make application for honors study, the student must re- 
ceive approval from the department, to which she will first submit 
a statement of her aims in the work which she wishes to undertake. 
Since this application must be completed not later than May 1 
of her junior year, the student planning to do honors work 
should consult the departmental adviser early that year. 



Evidence of achievement in honors work will be shown by 
presenting to the departmental Committee on Honors a research 
thesis, a series of brief scholarly essays, or a creative project. If 
the committee approves, it may recommend that the student 
be awarded a degree with honors. If the committee does not 
regard the thesis, essays or project as deserving of honors recogni- 
tion, it will determine the grade to be given. 



A wards 

Colgate W. Darden, Jr., Award 

This award was established in 1960 in honor of Colgate W. 
Darden, Jr., who was president of the University of Virginia 
from 1947 to 1959. It consists of a medal, designed by Gaetano 
Cecere, formerly of the Art Department, and also a cash sum. 
It is presented to the senior having the highest academic average. 

This award was made in June, 1968, to Ann Cecilia Scott, 
of Richmond, Virginia. 
The Thomas Jefferson Cup 

The Thomas Jefferson Cup is presented annually by the Alumnae 
Association at the Senior Convocation to that member of the 
graduating class who, during her years at Mary Washington Col- 
lege, has distinguished herself by academic achievement and out- 
standing service to the College. The award was established in 
1944 to commemorate the consolidation of Mary Washington 
College with the University of Virginia. 

This award was made in April, 1968, to Ann Cecilia Scott, 
of Richmond, Virginia. 
Kiwanis Award 

Through the interest and generosity of the Fredericksburg 
Kiwanis Club, a silver bowl is awarded each year to the senior 
who, in the judgment of the faculty, has contributed most to the 
promotion of the interests of the College during her stay here. 

This award was made in April, 1968, to Amelia Jane Bradley, 
of Alexandria, Virginia. 
Alpha Phi Sigma Award 

The Alpha Phi Sigma honorary scholarship fraternity makes 
an annual award to the junior who made the highest academic 
average during her freshman and sophomore years. The presenta- 
tion is made at the Chancellor's Convocation at the opening of 
the session. 

This award was presented on September 19, 1968, to Mary 
Helen Niemeyer, of Silver Spring, Maryland. 



69 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



70 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Requirements For Graduation 

1. An applicant for a degree must have earned 120 semester 
hours (in addition to four credits in physical education) and a 
minimum of 240 scholarship quality points. That is, the number 
of quality points must be at least twice the number of semester 
hours attempted. This means that every student must have at 
least an overall 2.0 grade average. Only credits earned at Mary 
Washington College are utilized in computing a student's eligibility 
for graduation. Courses taken elsewhere neither raise nor lower 
academic standing at the College. 

2. The number of quality points earned in courses taken in the 
major subject to satisfy the requirements of the major program 
must be at least twice the number of semester hours attempted. 

3. A student failing to have the necessary number of scholar- 
ship quality points by the time she completes her degree re- 
quirements may take additional courses to make up the required 
number of quality points. All such courses, however, must first 
be approved by the Dean. 

4. A transfer student must also earn at Mary Washington at 
least twice as many quality points as credit hours attempted. 

5. Responsibility for meeting the requirements for a degree rests 
with the student. 

6. An application for a degree must be filed in the Registrar's 
Office by the end of the second semester of the junior year. 

7. A total of at least two years of residence at Mary Washing- 
ton (four semesters) is required for a degree, and, except in the 
case of cooperative programs, the last semester of a student's 
work must also be done in residence at the College. At least 
eighteen semester hours in the major subject must be completed 
here. 

8. Correspondence courses are not accepted for transfer credit. 
Extension classes may be taken for credit only by permission 
of the Dean and the chairman of the department concerned. 
Under no circumstances may more than thirty hours of extension 
credit be counted toward a degree. 

9. Four credits in physical education are required for a degree, 
however, no more than four hours credit in activity courses are 
allowed. Students are urged to complete the required courses in 
physical education during their first two years of college, but may 
continue in other courses without receiving credit. 



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Degrees Offered 

The degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor 
of Science in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Bachelor 
of Science in Medical Technology, and Bachelor of Science in 
Physical Therapy are offered currently. The Bachelor of Science in 
Health, Physical Education, and Recreation will not be awarded 
after June, 1969. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 

One hundred and twenty-four semester hours of credit are 
required for the Bachelor of Arts degree, distributed as follows: 

Semester-Hours 
Basic Requirements 12 

English Composition and Literature 6 

Mathematics or Problems in Philosophy 6 

Area Requirements 44 

Language and Literature 18 

1 . Foreign Language and Literature. ... 1 2* 

2. English Literature Courses 6 

Natural Science 8 

Fine Arts: Art, Music, Dramatic Arts 6 

United States History or History of 

Civilization 6 

Economics, Geography, Political Science, 

Psychology, or Sociology (one field only) .. 6 

Major Program 36 

Major Subject 24 

Related Subjects (6 hours of the related subjects may be included 
in area requirements if permitted by the department in which 

Electives 28 

(Sufficient credits to total 120 semester hours) 

120 

Physical Education 4 

Total required for graduation** 124 

Courses counted toward fulfilling any of the basic or area re- 
quirements for a degree cannot be counted also as part of the 
major subject requirements. A major program in English, for ex- 
ample, must include at least 24 semester hours in that subject, 
in addition to the 12 semester hours required of all students. 



73 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



*18 required if the student begins with an elementary course; 6 required if 

she begins beyond the intermediate level. 

** Students must also meet quality point requirements (See pp. 64). 




74 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Six of the 12 semester hours in related fields may, at the discretion 
of the departmental adviser, be included in the area requirements. 

The requirement of six hours in Mathematics or Problems in 
Philosophy should be met during the first or second year. Enroll- 
ment in Problems in Philosophy is limited to freshmen and sopho- 
mores. 

The requirement of six hours in Fine Arts normally should be 
met by taking Art 111-112, Art History; Dramatic Arts 211- 
212, World Drama; or Music 111-112, Survey of Music. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 

The Bachelor of Science degree is available to students com- 
pleting a major program in biology, chemistry, physics, psychology, 
or mathematics. Requirements are exactly the same as those for 
the Bachelor of Arts degree with two exceptions: 

(1) A modern foreign language (preferably German, French, 
or Russian) must be taken to satisfy the language requirement. 

(2) Instead of having a choice between mathematics and 
philosophy the student must complete six semester hours in 
mathematics. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Medical Technology 

The requirements for this degree are also the same as those for 
the Bachelor of Science degree, the specialized courses outlined in 
the curriculum on page 84 to 86 constituting the major pro- 
gram. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Physical Therapy 

The requirements for this degree are also the same as those for 
the Bachelor of Science degree, the cooperative program and sug- 
gested curriculum listed on page 86 to 88 constituting the major 
program. 



Major Program 

The major program usually includes 24 semester hours in the 
major subject and 12 semester hours in related subjects offered 
either in the major departments or in other departments. 

A major program leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree may 
be chosen from any one of the following fields: 



Art 


French 


Philosophy 


Biology 


Geography and 


Physics 


Chemistry 


Geology 


Political Economy 


Dance 


German 


Political Science 


Dramatic Arts and 


History 


Psychology 


Speech 


Latin 


Religion 


Economics 


Mathematics 


Sociology 


English 


Music 


Spanish 



Detailed statements of the requirements for a major program 
in each of the above fields are given in the section of the cata- 
logue entitled "Course Offerings" (pp 95 to 178). There are also 
certain interdepartmental major programs which draw their courses 
from closely related fields. For the specific schedules of subjects, 
see pages 78 to 83. 

Near the end of her sophomore year, each student should apply 
to the departmental chairman or the interdepartmental program 
adviser concerned for permission to undertake a major. In granting 
this permission, the department will inform the student of the 
name of her major adviser, who will help her to outline a pro- 
gram of studies for the junior and senior year and to meet depart- 
ment requirements. 

Elective Courses 

In addition to courses in the major fields listed above, the 
student may elect to take courses in astronomy, in education, in 
foreign languages other than those offering a major. She may 
also apply for admission to the Liberal Arts Seminars. 

Twelve semester hours in vocational subjects, such as Home 
Economics and Education, is the maximum allowed for all stu- 
dents. 



75 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Teaching 

Mary Washington does not confer professional degrees in Educa- 
tion. Students majoring in the various fields who wish to qualify 
for the Collegiate Professional Certificate may take the necessary 




76 



PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



courses as electives. (See pp 121 to 126 for sequence of courses 
leading to the Collegiate Professional Certificate.) 

Students who wish to qualify for teaching certificates should 
consult the requirements for certification in the state in which 
they expect to teach, in order that they may take the necessary 
courses. 

Preparation for Graduate Study 

A student contemplating graduate work should ascertain the 
requirements for advanced study in her field and should familiarize 
herself with the catalogues of specific graduate schools. As early 
as possible she should discuss her plans with her adviser, so that 
she may be guided in her program of studies. 

The student should normally select French or German to meet 
the undergraduate language requirements, and study both languages 
if she intends to pursue graduate work beyond the master's degree. 
In some fields Russian may prove valuable as a second language 
choice. 

The Honors Program of the College offers the student experi- 
ence in independent study and research that may help to qualify 
her for a graduate scholarship, fellowship, or assistantship. A 
collection of recent announcements of such awards is available. 

The student who applies for admission to the graduate school 
of a university may be required to take either the Graduate Re- 
cord Examination or the Miller Analogy Test before her applica- 
tion is considered. Information concerning these examinations may 
be obtained from the Testing Center. 



Foreign Languages 

Major programs are offered in French, German, Latin, and 
Spanish. Requirements for these major programs are listed with 
the course offerings, but students should consult members of the 
department before choosing courses in related fields. 

Students who choose a major program in a foreign language 
are expected to participate actively in the work of the departmental 
club promoting the use of that language. 

In addition to the major programs in Latin, French, Spanish 
and German, sequences of elective courses in Greek, Italian, 
Portuguese, and Russian are also offered. Any of these languages, 
except Portuguese, may be selected in meeting the foreign language 
requirements for a degree. 

No credit is given for less than one full year of any foreign 
language. 



Credit for a single year in a foreign language will be allowed 
only if it is offered in addition to the degree requirements in 
foreign language or if it is a third-year course meeting the degree 
requirement. 

If credit for three years of foreign language is necessary to 
meet degree requirements, all three years must be taken in the same 
language. 

A student who has high school credit for two or three units 
in a foreign language will not receive college credit for a beginning 
course in that language. 

A student who has high school credit for four years in a foreign 
language will not receive college credit for an intermediate course 
in that language. 

Sequence of courses and prerequisite requirements must be strictly 
followed if credit is expected. 

Students who plan to continue the study of a language are 
urged to enroll in a course in that language in their first year 
at this college. Experience shows that interruption of continuous 
study may seriously affect progress in a language. 



Junior Year Abroad 

Mary Washington College participates in various junior year 
abroad programs. Students completing courses in programs ap- 
proved by the Dean of the College and the chairman of the de- 
partment of their major interest may receive appropriate credit 
toward a degree at Mary Washington. Further information may 
be obtained from the Dean of the College. 



77 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



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Lji 



Interdepartmental Majors 

Interdepartmental majors are offered in five fields: (1) American 
Studies; (2) Asian Studies; (3) Classical Civilization; (4) Pre- 
Foreign Service; and (5) the Pre-Medical Sciences. These compre- 
hensive majors offer opportunity for a boarder preparation in 
certain areas of study than that afforded by the existing depart- 
mental majors. 

Students who select an interdepartmental major are not re- 
quired to complete the customary departmental major, but they 
must fulfill all other requirements for a degree. (See pages 73 to 
74 for listing of required courses.) 

Since the curriculum for each interdepartmental major is organized 
in detail, students should plan their programs of study rather 
carefully in consultation with the adviser listed for the field. 



78 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



American Studies- Advisers: Mr. Bernstein, Mr. Thomas 

The interdepartmental major in American Studies emphasizes 
as a foundation a balanced program in the following: 

1. American History 

2. Literature and Philosophy 

3. Social Sciences 

4. Fine Arts 

5. A knowledge of at least one non-American civilization. 



In addition to four required American Studies seminars, a 
mimimum of twenty-four hours in 300-400 level courses must be 
taken in a combination of these five areas. Beyond these basic 
requirements the program stresses flexibility in meeting the interests 
of the individual majors. A student may, according to her interests, 
concentrate in one of the above areas. 

The general requirements are exactly the same as those for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. It is recommended, however, that pro- 
spective majors take Political Science 201-202 to satisfy the require- 
ment in social science. 

A major program requires that each student complete the four 
American Studies seminars in her junior and senior years. No 
two seminars may be taken concurrently. The remainder of the 
major program will be planned around the five areas that form the 
core of the major in close consultation with the program directors. 



Asian Studies (offered for the first time in 1969-70) 

Both in method of study and in subject matter the Asian Studies 
major differs from the traditional major program. By means of 
a core curriculum in the sophomore year and a series of courses 
in appropriate departments in the junior and senior year it 
proposes to furnish students with a modest understanding of 
certain cultures and civilizations in Asia. For this understanding to 
be significant and wide-ranging it should be founded upon the 
sustained study of a relevant language and literature. 

One intention of the proposed program is to view a civilization 
from the differing perspectives of the various academic disciplines; 
another is to meet the pressing need for enlarged knowledge of 
non- Western civilizations. 

The general degree requirements are the same as those for the 
Bachelor of Arts except that an Asian language and literature 
may be taken to satisfy the Foreign Language and Literature 
requirement. 



The major program requires 36 credits: 

a) Core Curriculum 12 credits 

b) Language and Literature 6 credits 

c) Field of Specialization 18 credits 
Independent study, honors work, attendance at summer sessions 

of universities having courses in the Asian field, and study 
abroad during the sophomore or junior year in an Asian country 
will be encouraged. 

By core curriculum is meant a specially designed two-semester 
course (for a total of 12 credits), meeting five days a week on 
the morning tracks or four days a week in the afternoon tracks, to 
furnish an overview of the major classical and spoken languages 
in Asia and of the insight they furnish into the way of life and 
the value systems of the inhabitants of the region. The course 
also will acquaint students with the main political systems and 
physical features of Asia as well as the ethnic origins and societal 
organization of its people. Faculty members from various de- 
partments may contribute to this curriculum according to their 
competencies. In addition, visiting lecturers and resource persons 
(e. g. , from the Virginia Consortium for Asian Studies, from the 
University Center of Virginia, and from Washington) will be invited 
to take part in this particular course. 



79 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 




80 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Classical Civilization- Adviser: Mrs. Laura Sumner 

This interdepartmental major is centered in classical civiliza- 
tion and culture. Courses in the art, philosophy, history, and 
literature of ancient Greece and Rome constitute the basic require- 
ments. Either Latin or Greek must be taken in addition to a 
modern language, and both are recommended. 

The general requirements are exactly the same as those for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree, with these exceptions: 

(1) French, German, Latin, or Greek must be taken to satisfy 
the language requirement. 

(2) Philosophy 101-2 must be taken to satisfy the mathematics 
or philosophy requirement. 

(3) Art 11-112 must be taken to satisfy the fine arts require- 
ment. 

A major program requires that a student earn forty-four 
credits in courses in classical civilization. Thirty of the required 
credits must be: 

Latin or Greek 12 credits* 

History 331-2, History of Ancient Greece and Rome 6 credits 

Philosophy 321, Greek Philosophy 3 credits 

Philosophy 322, Medieval Philosophy 3 credits 

Art 385-6, Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology 6 credits 

Twelve additional credits are to be taken in courses selected 
from the following: 

Latin or Greek 12 credits 

Classics 201, Greek Literature in Translation 3 credits 

Classics 202 , Latin Literature in Translation 3 credits 

Music 305-6, History of Music 4 credits 

Philosophy 212, Aesthetics 3 credits 

Any advanced course in the History of Art 3 or 6 credits 

Any advanced course in the Department 

of Classics 3 or more credits 

*If a classical language is used to fulfill the language require- 
ment for the degree, the other classical language must be offered 
for the major. 







Pre- Foreign Service- Adviser: Mr. Kurt F. Leidecker 

The interdepartmental major in Pre-Foreign Service is a lib- 
eral arts course in which the offerings of certain departments are 
regrouped in such a way that they will prepare a student wishing to 
work in one of the many agencies of the United States directly 
or after supplementary training, to enter a business firm overseas, 
to teach in a foreign country, to join the Peace Corps, to work 
for a domestic organization, institution or foundation having 
a foreign department, or to continue her language, area, or foreign 
relations studies at a graduate school. 

A student choosing this major should indicate her interest at 
the latest during the second semester of her freshman year. Great 
stress is laid on American backgrounds, international area studies, 
and particularly foreign languages. 

The general degree requirements are the same as for the Bachelor 
of Arts degree, with these qualifications: 

1. Philosophy 101-102 must be taken to satisfy the mathematics 
or philosophy requirement. 

2. The modern foreign language to be taken should be the 
one in which the student comes to Mary Washington College 
with some proficiency, as determined by the Department of 
Modern Foreign Languages. This does not preclude the 
possibility of taking up a second foreign language, pre- 
ferably in the sophomore year. 

3. Economics 201-202 or Political Science 201 and 202 must be 
taken to satisfy the social science requirement. 



81 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



82 



The major program requires that a student earn 54 credits in 
recommended courses in the following departments: 

Modern Languages 12 credits 

Geography 9 credits 

Political Science 6 or 9 credits 

Economics 9 or 6 credits 

History 6 credits 

Philosophy 6 credits 

English or Psychology or Sociology 6 credits 

Ten additional credits are to be selected from cognate courses 
in various departments, including those mentioned under the major 
program, in order to attain greater proficiency in certain fields. 
In the event that relevant special courses are announced, the 
candidate for a degree is expected to take them under this category. 

Special groupings of courses, depending on the type of foreign 
service the student wishes to enter, will be made upon consultation 
with the adviser and the department involved. 

At least one- third of all courses taken must be on the junior 
and senior levels. Engaging in independent study and participa- 
tion in honors work, the Liberal Arts Seminars, and the Junior 
Year Abroad are encouraged so as to intensify certain area studies. 



PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 




Pre- Medical Sciences- Adviser: Mr. Thomas L. Johnson 

The interdepartmental major in the pre-medical sciences is de- 
signed as an undergraduate program for students planning to 
enter schools of medicine, dentistry, and medical technology. It 
provides a broader basis for further scientific study than the majors 
in biology or chemistry, but it does not replace majors in these 
fields. The general requirements are exactly the same as those for 
the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree with these 
exceptions: 

(1) French, German, or Russian must be taken to satisfy the 
language requirement. 

(2) Mathematics must be taken to satisfy the mathematics or 
philosophy requirement. 

(3) Psychology must be taken to satisfy the social science 
requirement. 

A major program requires that a student earn thirty-six credits 
in pre-medical courses. Twenty-eight of the required credits must 
be: 

Chemistry 211-212, Organic Chemistry 8 credits 

Chemistry 251, 252, Analytical Chemistry 8 credits 

Physics 201-2, General Physics 8 credits 

Biology 221, Chordate Anatomy 4 credits 

Eight additional credits are to be taken in courses selected from 
the following: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Psychology 

The above program meets the course requirements for ad- 
mission to practically all the medical schools, including that of the 
University of Virginia. However, students are advised to consult 
the catalogue of the school which they wish to enter for detailed 
listings of requirements. With permission of the adviser the re- 
quirements listed above may be modified to meet the special 
requirements of particular schools. 

The program also meets the course requirements for entrance 
to approved schools for medical and clinical laboratory technicians. 
Recommended electives are bacteriology, embryology, parasitology, 
and other advanced courses in biology. Physical Chemistry is re- 
commended by many medical schools. 



83 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



84 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Cooperative Programs 

Cooperative Program in Medical Technology— 
Adviser: Miss Rose Mary Johnson 

The College offers a degree program in Medical Technology in 
cooperation with the University of Virginia School of Medicine. 
The curriculum covers three sessions of academic work at Mary 
Washington College, followed by a twelve-month period of specia- 
lized training in medical technology. 

On successful completion of the fourth academic year the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology will be awarded 
by Mary Washington College. After satisfactory completion of the 
twelve-month period at Charlottesville, the student will be eligible 
to take the examinations for registration and certification by the 
Board of Registry of Medical Technologists of the American 
Society of Clinical Pathologists. 

The number of students who can be admitted to the final twelve- 
month training period is limited by the facilities available. Ad- 
mission to the last two years of the program will be based upon 
scholastic record, demonstrated aptitude, and a personal inter- 
view by Medical School representatives. Application for the fourth 
year should be made about one year prior to entrance. After 
registration for the second semester of the junior year a transcript 
must be sent to the Registrar, Registry of Medical Technology, 
Muncie, Indiana, with $1.00 evaluation fee, for approval. The 
interview with Medical School representatives will follow. 

In the event that a student enrolled in this program should 
change her interest or not qualify for admission to the clinical 
laboratories, she may continue with the regular degree program 
at Mary Washington College and the courses she has taken may 
be applied to a major in biology or chemistry. 



THE CURRICULUM 
At Mary Washington College 

First Year 

English Composition and Literature courses 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Chemistry 111-112 8 

Mathematics 111-112 6 

Physical Education 2 

Total 28 



Second Year 

English: Sophomore Literature Courses 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Biology 121-122 8 

Chemistry 251-252 8 

History 101-102, History 111-112, or Fine Arts 6 

Physical Education 2 

Total 36 



Third Year* 

Foreign Language or Fine Arts 6 

Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Economics 6 

Biology 371 and other Biology 8 

Chemistry 4 

Fine Arts, History 101-102, History 111-112, or electives..... 6 
Total 30 



The program for the third year should be planned in consulta- 
tion with the faculty adviser. Total hours for the three years must 
be not less than 94. Other courses recommended if the student's 
program permits are Chemistry 311-312, Chemistry 317-318, 
Biology 331, Biology 372, Biology 382. 



85 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Fourth Year 
At University of Virginia School of Medicine 

Detailed outlines of the curriculum for the fourth year at the 
University of Virginia may be obtained from the institution. 

The tuition fee for the twelve-month training period at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia is $100.00. This does not include maintenance 
or uniforms. The following fees are also charged: comprehensive 
fee $122.00 and Women Students' Association fee, $3.00. En- 
rollees are registered as students of the University of Virginia in 
the Department of Medicine, and housing is available in Mary 
Munford Hall. (See University of Virginia catalogue for rates, 
etc.) 

The clinical laboratories of the University of Virginia School 
of Medicine are approved by the Board of Registry of the Ameri- 
can Society of Clinical Pathologists and by the Council on 
Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical 



Association. Students completing the program as outlined meet 
the requirements of the Registry of Medical Technologists. 

Students desiring to enroll in this program should make appli- 
cation to the Director of Admissions, Mary Washington College 
of the University of Virginia, Fredericksburg, Virginia. 



86 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Cooperative Programs in Physical Therapy — 
Adviser: Miss Anna Scott Hoye 

There is a need for physical therapists (1) in the field of general 
medicine, neurology, orthopedics, and surgery; (2) for work with 
crippled children; and (3) for specialized services in the hospitals 
of the Army, Navy, and the Veterans Administration. 

Mary Washington College offers three courses of study for 
preparation of students in physical therapy. One provides two 
years of liberal arts work meeting the prerequisites of a third 
and fourth year of specialized training at any approved school of 
physical therapy which offers a two-year program. Upon satis- 
factory completion of the required work, the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Physical Therapy will be awarded by the particular 
medical school attended. 

The second program provides for three years of liberal arts 
work at Mary Washington College and a fourth or fifth year of 
specialized training at any approved school of physical therapy 
which offers a one-year course. Upon satisfactory completion of 
the required program of study the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Physical Therapy will be awarded by Mary Washington College 
or by the particular medical school attended. 

The third program is one in which a student graduates from 
Mary Washington College with a major in some appropriate 
field. Post-baccalaureate work may then be taken at an approved 
school of physical therapy with the possibility of earning graduate 
credit to be applied toward a master's degree. All courses of study 
should be worked out in detail with the help of the curriculum 
adviser. 

A suggested outline for the first two years of study follows. 
Substitution may be made with approval of the curriculum 
adviser. It is recommended that as soon as possible, certainly 
before the end of the freshman year, the student should make 
known to the adviser which program she intends to follow and to 
which school she wishes to make application for professional 
training, in order that specific prerequisites may be met. 




A list of physical therapy schools approved by the Council on 
Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, together with their particular prerequisites for entrance, is 
made available to each student in the adviser's office. 

Suggested curriculum for the first two years of study at Mary 
Washington College: 

First Year 

English Composition and Literature Courses 6 

Mathematics 111-112, Mathematical Analysis 6 

Biology 121-122, Biological Concepts 8 

History 101-102, American History or History 111-112, 

History of Civilization 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Physical Education 2 

Total 34 

Second Year 

English: Sophomore Literature Courses 6 

Biology 337-338 , Anatomy and Physiology 8 

Psychology 201-202, General Psychology 6 

Chemistry 111-112, General Chemistry 8 

Foreign Language 6 

Physical Education 2 

Total 36 



87 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Orientation without credit is offered every year in the form of 
a professional Physical Therapy Club. All interested students may 
join and participate in the club's varied activities such as visits 
to nearby institutions, indoctrination lectures, moving pictures, 
etc. 

Directions for admission to Mary Washington College are to 
be found elsewhere in this catalogue. Application to the pro- 
fessional school is made at the end of the school year which 
precedes the last year of study at Mary Washington College. 

Cooperative Program In Nursing — 
Adviser: Miss Rebecca T. Woosley 

The School of Nursing, University of Virginia, offers a four- 
year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing. This program consists of prescribed lower division courses* 
prerequisite to the nursing major, and an upper division** 
nursing major. 

Required lower division courses are offered by Mary Washing- 
ton College of the University of Virginia in Fredericksburg, 
Virginia. The upper division nursing major is offered by the 
School of Nursing, University of Virginia, in Charlottesville, 
Virginia. This program qualifies the graduate for positions in 
hospital, clinic, office, school, industry, public health nursing 
and for commissions in military service. Most full-time students 
can complete this program in four semesters of study at Mary 
Washington College, one six-week summer session and four semes- 
ters at the School of Nursing, University of Virginia. 

Initial application for admission to this program is to be made 
to Mary Washington College. Appropriate application forms may 
be obtained from the Director of Admissions, Mary Washington 
College of the University of Virginia, Fredericksburg, Virginia 
22401. 

Students wishing to transfer from Mary Washington College to 
the School of Nursing, University of Virginia, should apply to 
the School of Nursing at the time of admission to Mary Washing- 
ton College to insure appropriate academic advisement. Candidates 
should send or have the proper authority send the following to 
the Chairman of Admissions, School of Nursing, University of 
Virginia, McKim Hall, Charlottesville, Virginia' 22903. 



*First and second year of the program. 
**Third and fourth year of the program. 



1. A complete formal application with a recent photograph 
attached (application form provided by the School of Nurs- 
ing). 

2. One letter of recommendation from a person not related 
to the candidate (form provided by the School of Nursing). 

3. A transcript of high school record or its equivalent to 
be sent by the institution attended. 

4. A transcript of all college work. 

5. Medical and dental reports (forms provided by the School 
of Nursing at the appropriate time). 

6. Scores attained on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the 
College Entrance Examination Board. 

7. A letter to the Chairman of Admissions, School of Nursing, 
requesting an interview. Although an interview is not re- 
quired, it is recommended for academic advisement. 

Maintenance of a cumulative C average on all work prerequisite 
to the upper division nursing major is required to qualify for 
admission to the School of Nursing as a third year student. 

PROGRAM 
FIRST YEAR-Mary Washington College 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 
Cr. Hours Cr. Hours. 

English 111-112, Composition and Reading 3 3 

Biology 121-122, General Biology 4 4 

Chemistry 111-112, General Chemistry 4 4 

History 101-102, American History or History 

111-112, History of Civilization 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Total 15 15 



89 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



SECOND YEAR-Mary Washington College 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 
Cr. Hours Cr. Hours 

English: Sophomore Literature Courses 3 3 

Psychology 201-202 , General Psychology 3 3 

Sociology 201-202, Principles of Sociology, 

Social Problems 3 3 

Biology 371, Bacteriology 4 

Home Economics 23 1 , Nutrition 3 

Biology 382 , Anatomy and Physiology 5 

Physical Education 1 1 

Elective 2 

Total 17 17 



UPPER DIVISION: THE NURSING MAJOR AT THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF VIRGINIA:* 

SUMMER SESSION-Six weeks Sem. Hrs. 

Cr. 

Nursing 1 : Fundamentals of Nursing 6 

The first course in the nursing major, Fundamentals of Nursing, 
is offered in a six-week summer session on the Grounds of the 
University of Virginia. In general, students are required to com- 
plete all lower division work prerequisite to the nursing major 
before enrollment in Fundamentals of Nursing. However, selected 
students may be admitted to this first course in nursing upon 
completion of the Freshman year of study. 



90 



PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 




THIRD YEAR: 

Sem. Hrs. 
Cr. 

Theory and Practice of Nursing 1 5 

Theory and Practice of Nursing II 5 

Dynamics of Human Relations I 2 

Dynamics of Human Relations II 3 

Theory and Practice of Nursing III 5 

Theory and Practice of Nursing IV 5 

Electives (from areas other than nursing) 6 

FOURTH YEAR: 

Advanced Medical-Surgical Nursing 4 

Advanced Psychiatric Nursing 4 

Advanced Maternal and Child Health Nursing 4 

Advanced Community Health 4 

Advanced Leadership 4 

Independent Study 2-4 

Principles of Organization and Management 3 

Electives (from areas other than nursing) 3 

Elective (Nursing) 2 

Total (Upper Division) 67-69 

After successful completion of this program, the student is 
eligible to write the examination for licensure as a registered 
professional nurse. Complete information concerning tuition, 
expenses, and terms of payment can be found in the School of 
Nursing Record. 

* Curriculum is subject to change 



#-^,, m 




Cooperative Program in Elementary Education — 
Adviser: Mrs. Catherine Hook 

Students who wish a more specialized preparation for teaching 
in the elementary grades than that offered at Mary Washington 
may enroll in a cooperative program for the preparation of 
elementary teachers leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Education at the University of Virginia. 

This program provides that the first two years of general 
academic work be taken at Mary Washington College and the third 
and fourth year, including both academic and professional work, 
be taken in the School of Education at the University of Vir- 
ginia, in Charlottesville. 

Students interested in the cooperative program sponsored by 
the University of Virginia and Mary Washington College should 
apply for admission to Mary Washington College stating their 
desire to take elementary education. Upon their enrollment, the 
School of Education at the University will be notified of the 
student's choice and the student's adviser at Mary Washington 
College, in cooperation with the Dean of that College and the 
Dean of the School of Education, will institute a program to help 
the student carry out the work successfully. 

Cooperative Program in Speech Pathology and 
Audiology- Adviser: Mr. Albert G. Duke 

There is an increasing demand for teachers and clinical workers 
with special training in speech, including speech pathology and 
audiology. To supplement the major program in Dramatic Arts 
and Speech at Mary Washington College, a cooperative program 
has been established with the University of Virginia to provide 
a major program in speech pathology and audiology. 



91 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



This program provides that the first three years of work be 
taken at Mary Washington College and that the fourth year be 
spent in residence at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. 
Students who transfer to Mary Washington College are required 
to spend two years in residence prior to their senior year at the 
University. Upon completion of the program at the University 
of Virginia the student receives a Bachelor of Arts degree from 
Mary Washington College, with a major in speech pathology and 
audiology. 

Students interested in the program should apply to the Director 
of Admissions, Mary Washington College. Requests for further 
information about the program should be addressed to the Director 
of the Speech and Hearing Center, University of Virginia, 
Charlottesville. 

A normal course of study for the cooperative program in 
speech pathology and audiology is as follows: 

AT MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 



92 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



First Year 
Course Semester-hours 

English Composition and Literature Courses 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Mathematics 6 

Natural Science 8 

Health Education 100, 101, Health 2 

Physical Education 2 

Total 30 



Second Year 

Semester-hours 

English: Sophomore Literature Courses 6 

Foreign Language* 6 

Speech 231-232, Oral Interpretation 6 

Psychology 201-202, General Psychology 6 

History 101-102, American History 6 

Physical Education 2 

Total 32 



*Students must complete six semester-hours of foreign language 
beyond the intermediate level. 



Third Year 

Fine Arts* 6 

Speech 421-422, Voice Science and Phonetics** 6 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 6 

Psychology 321, Child Psychology 3 

Elective (Psychology, Dramatic Arts or Speech) 3 

Psychology 311, Abnormal Psychology (Mental Hygiene) 3 
Social Science (History, Political Science, Economics, 

or Sociology) 6 

Total 33 

AT THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA 
Course No. Semester-hours 

Speech Education 108: Experimental Phonetics 3 

Speech Education 121: Rehabilitation Programs 

In Speech and Hearing 3 

Speech Education 131: Principles of Speech 

Correction 3 

Speech Education 132: Principles of Speech Pathology 3 

Speech Education 133: Diagnostic Techniques in 

Speech Pathology 3 

Speech Education 1 40: Articulation Disorders 3 

Speech Education 151: Introduction to Audiology 3 

Speech Education 153: Audiometry 3 

Speech Education 157: Aural Rehabilitation 3 

Electives 6 

Total 33 

Observation and Practice Facilities. As a part of the academic 
program in speech pathology and audiology, observation and 
supervised practice are required. Opportunities for such are pro- 
vided by the Speech and Hearing Center and also through 
established working relationships with such facilities as the 
Charlottesville City and Albemarle County Public Schools, certain 
Departments of the University of Virginia Medical Center, the 
Children's Rehabilitation Center, the Virginia School for the Deaf 
and the Blind, the Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center for 
adults, the Veterans Administration Hospital, and the Mobile 
Clinic of the Virginia Hearing and Speech Foundation, Inc. 



93 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



♦Dramatic Arts 211-212, World Drama, recommended. 

**Speech 421-422, Voice Science and Phonetics, is offered only 
in alternate years. If offered during a student's sophomore year, 
this course should be taken in place of Oral Interpretation, 
which should be deferred until the junior year. 




Internship Program for the Preparation of Teachers 

Through arrangements with the University of Virginia, a qualified 
Mary Washington College student may enter after graduation 
the Internship Program for the Preparation of Teachers. Students 
may prepare to teach in elementary schools, in special programs 
for exceptional children, or in any one of the following secondary 
school fields: 

Biology Latin 

Chemistry Mathematics 

English Music 

French Physics 

General Science Social Studies 

94 History Spanish 

At Mary Washington the student takes work to fulfill her 

PROGRAM major program and degree requirements. She completes all work 

OF STUDIES m general and professional education that is required for Vir- 

ginia certification except Supervised Teaching. Immediately after 
graduation from Mary Washington the student enters the Summer 
Session of the School of Education at the University. She will take 
course work as further preparation for teaching her subject or 
grade level. In the fall she will be assigned to a cooperating school 
where she will have half of a teaching load, for which she will 
receive half salary. A cooperating teacher will be assigned by the 
school division to work with and help her. College supervisors 
will be in close communication with intern teachers, and seminars 
will be conducted periodically. During the intern year the student 
will be permitted to earn three graduate credits a semester, in 
addition to the six credits for the year she will earn for the intern 
teaching. After the year of intern teaching, the student may return 
to the University to complete the remaining work which leads to 
the award of a masters degree. 

Inquiries about the program should be directed to the Depart- 
ment of Education at Mary Washington College. Applications must 
be submitted to the Department of Education by May 15 of the 
student's junior year. Notification of acceptance will be made 
during the summer between the student's junior and senior year. 




Qourse 
Offerings 






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Nearly 500 courses in 23 disciplines are offered at Mary Washing- 
ton College each year. Included are course offerings in American 
Studies; Art/ History of Art, Studio Art (Practice of Art); 
Astronomy; Biology; Chemistry; Classics/ Greek, Latin, Classical 
Civilization; Dramatic Arts and Speech; Economics and Political 
Science; Education; English; Geography and Geology; Health, 
Physical Education, and Recreation/ Health, Physical Education, 
Dance, Recreation; History; Home Economics; Liberal Arts 
Seminar; Mathematics; Modern Foreign Languages/ French, Ger- 
man, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Music; Philosophy; 
Physics; Psychology; Religion; and Sociology. 

Courses numbered from 100 to 199, inclusive, are first-year 
courses; 200 to 299, second-year courses; 300-399, third-year 
courses; and 400-499, fourth-year courses. All course credits are 
expressed in semester hours. A course listed as "six credits" 
is a continuous course for the session of nine months and carries 
a credit of six semester hours. Courses listed as "three credits 
each semester" may be taken for a semester only if desired. 

Continuous courses, of which the student must complete both 
semesters to receive any credit, are indicated by hyphens between 
the numbers, such as Biology 121-122. 

Courses for which credit is given for either or both semesters 
are indicated by commas between the numbers, such as Art 
305, 306. 

Courses in which the first semester is not prerequisite for the 
second are indicated by a plus following the number, such as 
English 371, 372+ . 



97 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



AMERICAN STUDIES/ Assistant Professors Bernstein, Thomas. 

The following four seminars are designed specifically for Ameri- 
can Studies majors, and must be taken in their junior and senior 
years. These seminars will be open to students by permission of 
the instructor. 

American Studies Seminar I— Regionalism. 

An inquiry into the cultural regions of the United States, covering such 
topics as the European heritage, ethnic and racial elements of the population, 
environmentalism, the growth of social institutions, the individual art forms, 
and the philosophy of regionalism. Three credits. Mr. Bernstein. 



American Studies Seminar II— Darwin and Freud. 

A study of the impact of evolution and psychoanalytic theory upon Ameri- 
can thought, with special attention to literature, religion, sociology, and 
psychology. To be taken in the junior year. Three credits. Mr. Thomas. 



American Studies Seminar III— The Impact of the American 

Experience on the Fine Arts in America. 

A Study of selected individuals and their work in the creative arts in the 
United States. The seminar will investigate whether or not there is a unique 
"American art" form. Three credits. Mr. Bernstein. 

American Studies Seminar IV— Mass Media and American Culture. 

A study of contemporary American culture through an analysis of mass 
media: television, popular music, popular theatre, best-sellers, movies, news- 
papers, advertising and sports. These popular expressions are to be examined 
as a means of illuminating American character, values, ideals and aspirations. 
Three credits. Mr. Thomas. 



98 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



ART/ Professor Pauline G. King, Chairman; Professors Bin ford, 
Laura Sumner; Visiting Potter Hara; Associate Professor Muick; 
Assistant Professors Bernstein, Fischer, Herban, Oliver; In- 
structors Cum, Cohen, Johnson. 

The courses in the Department of Art which may be elected to 
satisfy the general college Fine Arts requirement for the B. A. 
Degree are: Art 111 plus 3 credits to be selected from Arts 
213,214,215,216. 

Two major programs are offered within the department: Studio 
Art (Practice of Art) and History of Art. Students majoring in 
either program must arrange their four-year schedules in con- 
sultation with an adviser in order to assure a coordinated program. 

Courses in studio art may be elected by non-majors when they 
have completed the necessary requirements. Art 101-102, or its 
equivalent, is a prerequisite for any 200 level course in studio 
art. Specific departmental prerequisites for each course must be 
adhered to, and the same conditions for admission to studio 
courses apply equally to majors and to non-majors. 

Courses in art history may be elected by non-majors, but they 
must have had the equivalent of the six hours of introductory 
material listed at the beginning of this section as suitable for ful- 
filling the general college B.A. Degree requirement in Fine Arts. 
In exceptional cases, permission may be obtained from the Depart- 
mental Chairman and the instructor of a given course, whenever the 
student has achieved sufficient competence to be able to deal with 
that course, although not necessarily with all' advanced courses. 
Art 385-386 has no prerequisite. In all cases, the completion of an 
advanced (300 or 400 level) art history course precludes receiving 
subsequent or concurrent credit for a lower (100 or 200) level 
course covering the same periods, or subject matter areas. This 
rule becomes effective with the Spring Semester of 1969. 



Studio Art Major: 

In addition to the general college admission requirements, each 
student applying for a major in studio art must submit a portfolio 
of work done previously, whether in classes or on her own. Photo- 
graphs or slides of pottery and sculpture will be acceptable, if 
the student wishes to include work in these fields for consideration. 
If it is impossible to bring examples of work, a test will be given 
the student by the studio art staff. Advanced standing may be re- 
quested by entering majors or by non-major students who wish 
to elect studio art classes; decision will be made on the basis of 
previous courses taken, work submitted, and conferences with the 
studio art staff. 

Requirements for the major: 24 credits in studio art more 
advanced than Art 101-102, and 12 credits in Art History. Art 
101-102, or its equivalent is prerequisite for any 200 level course 
in studio art. Art History 1 1 1 plus one of the 200 level art his- 
tory courses are prerequisite for all other courses in art history. 
The art history courses may be taken as part of the 12 credits 
of art history in the major; if so, the college degree require- 
ments for six credits in Fine Arts may be satisfied by taking Music 
111, 112 or Dramatic Arts 211-212. The two semesters of the basic 
course, Art 101-102, are offered each semester, so that the student 
may complete the entire course in a single year, regardless of 
which section is taken first. 

In planning their programs, all majors must arrange to take at 
least 4 credits of figure drawing, Art 211-212 or Art 241-242. 

Sequence of courses in studio art: 8-12 credits are to be selected 
from courses number on the 200 level; at least 12 credits are to 
be selected from courses numbered on the 300-400 levels. All 
classes beyond to Art 101-102, may be taken by semesters, but a 
year's work is recommended. If a student has completed the col- 
lege requirements for graduation and fulfilled the departmental 
requirements for the major, she may elect additional studio art 
courses. 

Students expecting to teach art should see their adviser at the 
end of the sophomore year, to be sure that state certification re- 
quirements may be met by scheduling the necessary departmental 
courses. In addition, Art Ed. 342 (listed under the Education 
Department), is required in the junior or senior year for the 
prospective art teacher; it must be taken before the student does 
student teaching and may be elected in place of Ed. 322, of the 
professional sequence Ed. 321-322, regularly required for certifi- 
cation to teach on the secondary school level in Virginia. 



99 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



French, German, and Italian are the languages most useful for 
the art student, insofar as European travel or the ability to read 
the historical literature of the field are concerned. 



100 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



History of Art Major: 

The major consists of 30 credit hours over and above the college 
B.A. Degree Fine Arts requirements (Art 111 plus 3 credits selected 
from Arts 213, 214, 125, 216). However, for art history majors 
who declare and are accepted as majors by the department as of 
March 5, 1969, these 200 level courses are prerequisite for ad- 
vanced courses in corresponding periods or subject matter areas. 
In summary, 9 credits from the 200 level sequence are to be 
counted as part of the 30 credit hours in the major; 18 hours are 
to be selected from the art history courses on the 300 and 400 
level; and Art 485 (3 credits) must be taken as a senior graduation 
requirement. 

Students planning to do graduate work in art history are ad- 
vised to take a second foreign language among their electives. A 
reading knowledge of both French and German is required for 
most graduate work in art history. 

In order to assure a well-rounded, liberal arts program, it is 
recommended that while the student is reviewing courses to fulfill 
the degree requirements for the remaining 34 hours of credit, in 
consultation with her adviser, she consider the following groups 
of suggestions: 

Foreign Language (French or German) 

History courses (including History 111-112, if not already taken) 

Studio Art Courses 

Selections from the following listed alphabetically: Introduction 
to Anthropology, Dramatic Arts (211-212; 361-362), Liberal Arts 
Seminar, Advanced Literature courses, Music (History and Litera- 
ture), Mythology, Philosophy, and Religion. 



Studio Art Courses 

Art 101— Two-dimensional Design. 

Prerequisite: a portfolio of work done previously or a test given by the 
studio staff. Experiments in two-dimensional composition. The use of the 
visual elements such as line variation, mass concept, shape relationship, 
and color interaction. Given each semester. Two double periods a week. 
Two credits. Mr. Chu. 



Art 102— Three-dimensional Design. 

Prerequisite: a portfolio of work done previously or a test given by the 
studio staff. A development of three-dimensional structures, emphasizing the 
construction of visual order in space. Exercises and experiences will be pro- 
vided showing the relationships between two-demensional and three-dimensional 
design, through the use of such elements of design as texture, plane re- 
lationships, line and color, unity and variety of masses, etc. Both figurative 
and non-figurative subject-matter will be utilized. Two double periods a week. 
Two credits. Mr. Muick. 

Art201,202+-Z)ravWw& 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102 or its equivalent. Structural drawing of various 
forms with special emphasis on symmetrical and asymmetrical order, static 
and dynamic forces, space and time concept, harmonious and contrary 
unity. Three double periods a week. Two credits each semester. Mr. Chu. 

Art 211, 212-K- Figure Study. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102 or its equivalent. Basic approach to figure drawing: 
posture, contour, analytical and structural studies from the model. A develop- 
ment from objective interpretation to subjective expression of the human 
form. Three double periods a week. Two credits each semester. Mr. Chu. 



Art 231 , 2324— Beginning Sculpture. 

Experience in principles of form and design. The study and construction 
of volume and mass through the use of plastic and carving media. Three 
double periods a week. Two credits each semester. Mr. Muick. 



Art 241 ,242— Drawing and Composition. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102, or its equivalent. Picture-making in various 
mediums; life drawing. Three double periods a week. Two credits each 
semester. Mr. Binford. 



101 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Art 251, 252^ Pottery and Hand-Building. 

A concentrated study of the basic steps and forms of the pottery wheel; 
exploration of form and texture through various hand-building processes. 
Three double periods a week. Two credits each semester. Mr. Hara. 

Art 321, 322- Printmaking. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102 and one year of figure drawing or the equivalent. 
Introduction to various processes in planography, relief, serigraphy and 
intaglio. Exploration in multiple-color and mixed printing. Three double 
periods a week. Two credits each semester. Mr. Chu. 



Art 341- 342+— Intermediate Sculpture. 

Prerequisite: Art 231, 232, or its equivalent. Representational and non- 
representational projects in a variety of media. Three double periods a week. 
Two credits each semester. Mr. Muick. 



Art 351- 352- Oil Painting. 

Prerequisite: Art 241, 242, or its equivalent. Still-life and figure painting 
in oils. Three double periods a week. Two credits each semester. Mr. Binford. 

Art 381 , 382 - Pottery and Hand-Building. 

Prerequisite: Art 251-252, or its equivalent. A more advanced study of 
wheel thrown forms; further exploration of hand-building processes; ceramic 
sculpture, and glaze experiments and firing. Three double periods a week. 
Two credits each semester. Mr. Hara. 

Art 401 , 402+ - Figure Painting. 

Prerequisite: Art 351, 352, or its equivalent. Figure and portrait painting; 
landscape in the spring. Three double periods a week. Two credits each 
semester. Mr. Binford. 

Art 41 1 , 412-h— Advanced Sculpture. 

Prerequisite: Art 341, 342. The development of ideas and sketches to be 
executed in permanent materials. Three double periods a week. Two credits 
each semester. Mr. Muick. 



102 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Art 475, 476 +- Special Studies in Studio Art. 

A course designed to offer opportunity to the student who wishes to con- 
tinue work, independently, in a field of her choice, but under the super- 
vision of a member of the studio faculty. Three double periods a week. 
Two credits each semester. 

See also, Art Ed. 342 (listed under the Education Department). Seminar 
in Art Education. 

See also, Ed. 440— Supervised Teaching. 



History of Art Courses 

Art 111— Introduction to the History of Art. 

Emphasis on a selected number of specific monuments of Western art, 
including examples from architecture, sculpture, and painting. These will be 
considered from the standpoint of the developmental principles involved, their 
relationships to other works more freely selected by the individual instructor, 
and the probable aesthetic and cultural factors relevant to their creation. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. Mr. Bernstein, Miss Cohen, Miss Fischer, 
Mr. Herban, Miss King, Mrs. Oliver. 

Art 213— Ancient Art. 

An introduction to the outstanding contributions made by the Near East, 
Greece and Rome to the formation of Western art. Three hours a week. 
Three credits. Miss King. 



Art 214- Medieval Art. 

An assessment of the dominant contributions of Medieval Europe to 
Western art. Three hours a week. Three credits. Mr. Herban. 



Art 215— Renaissance and Baroque Art. 

An introduction to the art of the Renaissance and the Baroque with an 
emphasis on humanist trends. Three hours a week. Three credits. Mrs. 
Oliver. 

Art 216— Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Art. 

A study of the stylistic and technical developments necessary to an under- 
standing of modern art. Three hours a week. Three credits. Mr. Bernstein, 
Miss Cohen, Mr. Herban. 

Art 312- Early Medieval Art (circa 250-1050). 

Concentration on the study and development of early Christian, Byzantine, 
and Pre-Romanesque art. Introductory discussions on their emergence from 
the arts and civilization of late antiquity. Three periods a week. Three credits. 
Miss Fischer. 

Art 313- Later Medieval Art (circa 1050-1400). 

At the beginning, a survey of the arts of the late eleventh century; course 
concentration on the emergence and development of Romanesque and Gothic 
art, ending with the court styles of the fourteenth century and the transition 
to the renaissance. Three periods a week. Three credits. Miss Fischer. 



Art 31 5— Seventeenth Century Art. 

An analysis of 17th century art as it evolves from "Mannerism" to "the 
Baroque," with a treatment of its contributions to subject matter and 
technique. Emphasis upon the Carracci; Caravaggio; Bernini and Borromini; 
Rubens; Rembrandt; the Dutch landscapists and genre painters; Poussin 
and Claude; palace and garden design; Velasquez. Three hours a week. 
Three credits. Miss King. 



103 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Art 316- Eighteenth Century Art. 

Emphasis on French Rococo, its derivations and influences on Continental 
and British art; the evolution of its forms into the Neo-Classic with particular 
emphasis given to Jacques Louis David. Consideration of the decorative 
arts as evidence of stylistic change wherever relevant. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. Miss King. 

Art 317- Northern Art. 

Painting and graphics of the Lowlands, France and Germany from the late 
medieval period through the early sixteenth century. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. Mrs. Oliver. 

Art 318— Italian Renaissance Art. 

Art of the Italian Renaissance and its origins in the social and intellectual 
climate, with emphasis on painting. Some class meetings at the National 
Gallery of Art in Washington. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mrs. 
Oliver. 



Art 319— Italian Renaissance Architecture and Sculpture. 

A treatment of the historic, aesthetic, and theoretical bases for these arts, 



104 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



in the 15th and 16th centuries. Landscape design and city planning, as settings, 
will be dealt with where relevant. Three periods a week. Three credits. 
Miss King. 

Art 335— The Art of Primitive Peoples. 

An introduction to the arts of the three major art-producing areas of the 
primitive world: Negro Africa, Oceania, and North America. While ex- 
amples of architecture and painting are discussed, sculpture is emphasized. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. (Not offered, 1969-70) 

Art 385— Greek Art and Archaeology. 

No prerequisite. A survey of archaeology in Greece and a general study 
of archaeological methods. A study of Aegean and Greek sculpture, painting, 
architectural, and minor arts from the prehistoric periods through the 
Hellenistic age. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mrs. Sumner. 

Art 386— Roman Art and Archaeology. 

No prerequisite. A survey of Roman archaeology and a general study of 
archaeological methods. A study of Italic, Etruscan, and Roman sculpture, 
painting, architecture, and minor arts from earliest times through the late 
Roman empire. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Art 391- Georgian Art. 

A study of British art and aesthetics, largely of the eighteenth century, 
stressing not only portraiture and Palladianism, but the rise of exoticism 
and nostalgia which show Britain to be the cradle of Romanticism. Three 
periods a week. Three credits. Miss King. 

Art 451— Nineteenth Century Art. 

After introductory material dealing with seventeenth and eighteenth century 
art in France this course covers the movements of Classicism, Romanticism, 
Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. The emphasis is on French 
painting in the nineteenth century with some aspects of art in other European 
countries included. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Herban. 

Art 452— Twentieth Century Art. 

A survey of the architecture, painting and sculpture of Europe and the 
United States. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Herban. 

Art 481 , 482+- American Art. 

A study of painting, sculpture, and architecture of the United States; 
first semester covers the seventeenth, eighteenth, and the first half of the 
nineteenth centuries; second semester covers modern American art. Three 
periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Bernstein. 



Art 485— Research in the History of Art. 

Intensive reading, study and discussion emphasizing specific artists, move- 
ments or aspects of art. To be conducted as a seminar. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. Staff. Enrollment by permission of the instructors, but re- 
quired of all art history majors. 



Art 490, 491- Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the art history staff. 
Three credits each semester. (By permission of the department, on the basis 
of a presentation by the student of her problem, and a description of her 
method of approach, accompanied by an indication of the part to be played 
by the art history staff member.) 

ASTRONOMY/ Instructor Druzbick 

Astronomy 361,362— Elementary Astronomy. 

An historical and descriptive survey of the physical universe. Three periods 
a week. Three credits each semester. Astronomy 361 is prerequisite to Astro- 
nomy 362. Mr. Druzbick. 

BIOLOGY/ Professor William C. Pinschmidt, Jr., Chairman; 
Professors Black, Castle, Hoye; Associate Professors R. M. 
Johnson, T. L. Johnson, Parrish; Assistant Professors Friedman, 
M. W. Pinschmidt; Instructors Bass, Wilfong. 

Biology 121-122— Biological Concepts, is prerequisite to all 
advanced courses in Biology. Students who plan to major in 
Biology should complete Chemistry 111-112, General Chemistry, 
and Mathematics 111-112, Mathematical Analysis, by the end of 
the sophomore year. The major program must include twenty- 
four hours or more of courses more advanced than Biology 121- 
122. The program should include courses from as many as possible 
of the following areas: Botany, Ecology, Embryology, Genetics, 
Chordate Anatomy or Invertebrate Zoology, and Physiology or 
Biochemistry. At least one semester of Biology 450, Seminar, 
are required during the junior and/ or senior year. A member of 
the Biology staff must be consulted in planning the major program. 

Biology 121- 122- Biological Concepts. 

General biological principles as they apply to plants and animals. Three 
single and one three-hour periods a week. Eight credits. Staff. 

Biology 221— Chordate Anatomy. 

A comparative study of the major systems of representative chordates. 
Two single and two double periods a week for the first semester. Four 
credits. Mr. Johnson. 

Biology 231— Systematic Botany. 

A survey of the plant kingdom with emphasis on life histories and evolu- 
tionary relationships. Two single and two double periods a week for the first 
semester. Four credits. Staff. 



105 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Biology 232— Biology of Angiosperms. 

Morphogenetic description, physiology, and adaptations in flowering plants. 
Two single and two double periods a week for the second semester. Four 
credits. Mr. Wilfong. 



Biology 241— Invertebrate Zoology. 

A survey of the invertebrate phyla with emphasis on structural char- 
acteristics, life cycles, and evolutionary relationships. Two single and two 
double periods a week for the first semester. Four credits. Mr. Pinschmidt. 

Biology 322— Ecology. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112. General Chemistry. The relationships 
between living organisms and their environment. Field trips and laboratory 
studies include observations of marine, fresh water, and terrestrial organisms 
in their natural habitats. Two single periods and six hours of laboratory or 
field work a week for the second semester. Four credits. Mr. Pinschmidt. 

Biology 331— Vertebrate Histology. 

The preparation and study of animal tissues. Two single and two double 
periods a week for the first semester. Four credits. Mrs. Black. 

Biology 332— Chordate Embryology. 

The development of representative chordates. Two single and two double 
periods a week for the second semester. Four credits. Mr. Johnson. 



106 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Biology 337— Human Anatomy. 

Gross structure of the human body. Two single and two double periods 
a week for the first semester. Four credits. Miss Hoye. 

Biology 338— Human Physiology. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112. General Chemistry. Functional aspects of 
the human organism. Two single and two double periods a week for the 
second semester. Four credits. Miss Hoye. 



Biology 341— Evolution and Genetics. 

A course designed for non-majors. History of evolutionary thought and 
genetic principles. Three single periods a week for the first semester. Three 
credits. Staff. 

Biology 360— Cellular Physiology. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: one advanced course in Chemistry. Principles 
of general and cellular physiology. Two single and two double periods a week 
for the second semester. Four credits. Mrs. Friedman. 



Biology 371— Microbiology. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112, General Chemistry. A survey of micro- 
organisms with emphasis on the bacteria, designed to introduce the student 
to the morphology, physiology, and clinical aspects of the field. Two single 
and two double periods a week for either semester. Four credits. Miss 
Johnson. 




Biology 372— Parasitology. 

The structure, life cycles, and host relationships of invertebrate parasitic 
forms. Two single and two double periods a week for the second semester. 
Four credits. Mrs. Black. 



Biology 382— Human Anatomy and Physiology. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112, General Chemistry. A course designed for 
students in the cooperative programs in nursing and medical technology. 
Structure and function of the human organism. Three single and two double 
periods a week for either semester. Five credits. Miss Hoye. 

Biology 441— Genetics. 

Mendelian inheritance and modern concepts of gene structure and function. 
Two single and two double periods a week for the second semester. Four 
credits. Miss Parrish. 



107 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Biology 450— Seminar. 

Selected readings, reports, and group discussions on topics of historical 
and current biological interest. Open to majors each semester of the junior 
and senior years. At least one semester is required during the junior and/or 
senior year. One credit. Staff. 

Biology 475— Readings in the Biological Sciences. 

Independent readings in current or classical biological literature in a field 
selected by the student. The student is guided by and responsible to a member 
of the staff. Open, each semester, to senior majors with permission of the 
staff. Two credits. Staff. 



Biology 476— Special Problems in Biology. 

Prerequisite: Biology 475. A program of independent laboratory or field 
investigation for which the student has reviewed the literature and organized 
her approach in the prerequisite course. The student is guided by and 
responsible to a member of the staff. Open, second semester, to senior 
majors with permission of the staff. Three credits. Staff. 



108 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



CHEMISTRY/ Professor Lawrence A. Wishner, Chairman; Pro- 
fessors Cover, Insley; Associate Professor Mahoney; Assistant 
Professors Crissman, George; Assistant Instructor Burke. 

A student who intends to major in chemistry should arrange 
a four-year program in consultation with a member of the chemis- 
try faculty. Chemistry 211, 212,393,394,451 and 452 are required 
for a major program in chemistry. Chemistry 11 1-1 12 is prerequisite 
to all other chemistry courses. Mathematics 1 1 1-1 12 is recommended 
for the freshman year. Mathematics 211-212 and Physics 201-202 
should be taken before the junior year. French, German, or Russian 
are recommended to fulfill the foreign language requirement. 

An honors program consisting of independent research leading 
to the preparation of a thesis is offered to qualified students 
for eight credits during the senior year. 

Chemistry 111-112— General Chemistry. 

A course designed to introduce the student to the fundamental principles 
of chemistry and the more important elements and their compounds. One 
three-hour and three single peiods a week. Eight credits. Staff. 

Chemistry 211-212- Organic Chemistry. 

A study of the chemistry of carbon compounds on the basis of structural 
theory. One three-hour and three single periods a week. Four credits each 
semester. Mr. Insley. 

Chemistry 251, 252— Analytical Chemistry. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 111-112. The first semester consists 
of an elaboration of the principles of chemistry with particular emphasis 
on chemical equilibrium. In the accompanying qualitative analysis laboratory, 
semi-micro techniques are employed. The second semester consists of the 
theory and techniques of volumetric, gravimetric, and introductory instru- 
mental analysis. Two single and two three-hour periods a week. Four credits 
each semester. Mr. Cover. 

Chemistry 317, 318— Biochemistry. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 212. The application of chemical principles to the 
study of living cells and organisms. The laboratory deals with selected research 

techniques. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week. Four credits each 
semester. Mr. Wishner. 



Chemistry 333— Advanced Analytical Chemistry I. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 251, 252. A study of advanced volumetric and 
gravimetric analytical techniques with emphasis on electrochemical and optical 
methods of analysis. One single and two three-hour periods a week. First 
semester. Four credits. Mr. Cover. 



Chemistry 343, 344— Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 

The study of modern theories of atomic structure and chemical bonding 
and their application to molecular structure, coordination chemistry, and 
metallic structure. Three single periods a week. Three credits each semester. 
MissCrissman. 

Chemistry 393, 394- Physical Chemistry. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 211-212, Physics 201-202, Chemistry 251, 252. 
A study of the thermodynamic, kinetic statistical, and quantum mechanical 
properties of chemical systems. The laboratory portion of the course will deal 
with physiochemical determinations and the statistical treatment of experi- 
mental results. Three single and two three-hour periods a week. Five credits 
each semester. Mr. Mahoney. 

Chemistry 411— Advanced Organic Chemistry. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 212. The study of organic reaction mechanisms and 
the relation of molecular structure to physical and chemical properties. Three 
single periods a week. First semester. Three credits. Mr. George. 



Chemistry 414— Identification of Organic Compounds. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 212. They systematic separation and identification 
of organic compounds. One single and two three-hour periods a week. Second 
semester. Three credits. Mr. George. 

Chemistry 434— Advanced Analytical Chemistry II. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Chemistry 394. A study of the theory and ap- 
plication of modern analytical methods as applied to the solution of structural 
and mechanistic problems. Topics will include spectrochemical and electro- 
chemical analysis, mass spectrometry, chemical separations, and computer 
data analysis. One four-hour and three single periods a week. Second semester. 
Four credits. Mr. Mahoney. 



109 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Chemistry 451, 452+- Seminar. 

Student preparation of reports on selected topics in chemistry for oral 
presentation and discussion. One hour a week. Required of all chemistry 
majors in senior year. Others admitted by permission of the chemistry 
department. One credit each semester. Mr. Mahoney and Staff. 

Chemistry 455, 456— Special Problems in Chemistry. 

A program of independent investigation under the direction of a member 
of the staff. Open to qualified students with the permission of the depart- 
ment. From one to four credits per semester depending upon the quantity of 
work planned. Staff. 



Chemistry 493— Advanced Physical Chemistry. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 394. An advanced treatment of selected topics in 
thermodynamics, kinetics, photochemistry, and quantum chemistry. Three 
single periods a week. First semester. Three credits. Mr. Mahoney. 



CLASSICS/ Professor Laura V. Sumner, Chairman; Professor 
Hargrove; Assistant Professors Cox, Sherwood. 

The Department of Classics offers a major program in Latin. 
The interdepartmental major in Classical Civilization is also closely 
allied to the work in the department. 

Students who select a major program in Latin must take thirty- 
six credits in Latin and related subjects. All students are required 
to take Latin 351, Advanced Latin Grammar. A student who 
plans to attend graduate school is expected to take Greek and 
should plan for it early enough in her program to allow at least 
two years to be taken. The thirty-six hours are to be distributed 
in the following manner: 



110 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



For students who enter college with three or four units of high 
school Latin: 

1. Twenty-five credits in Latin selected from the 300 and 400 
levels, including Latin 351. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits to be selected in consulta- 
tion with her major adviser. 

For students who enter college with one or two units of high 
school Latin: 

1. Twenty-five credits in Latin, not including Latin 113-114, 
with at least eighteen credits selected from the 300 and 400 
levels, including Latin 351. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits to be selected in consultation 
with her major adviser. 

For students who start Latin in college: 



1. 



2. 



Twenty-five credits, not including Latin 111-112, with at 
least twelve credits in Latin selected from the 300 and 400 
level, including Latin 351. 

In related fields, twelve credits to be selected in consultation 
with her major adviser. 



Greek 

Greek 131-132- Elementary Greek. 

Grammar; composition; reading in Xenophon's Anabasis; Nairn and Nairn 
Greek through Reading. Five periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Sherwood. 



Greek 133- 134- Intermediate Greek. 

Prerequisite: Greek 131-132 or two years of high school credit. Composition 
in North and Hillard Greek Prose Composition; reading of Thucydides, 
Athenian Disaster in Sicily; Plato, Apology, Homer, Odyssey Book 9. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Sherwood. 



The following courses are offered whenever there is sufficient demand. 

Greek 231-232- 

Prerequisite: Greek 133-134. Herodotus. Histories Book 6 (selections); 
Homer, Iliad Book 1; Thucydides, Book 2 (selections); composition. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Sherwood. 

Greek 331-332- 

Prerequisite: Greek 231-232. Aeschylus, Agamemnon; Aristotle, Ethics 
(selections); Demosthenes, First Phillipic (selections). Three periods a week. 
Six credits. Mr. Sherwood. 

Greek 431-432- 

Prerequisite: Greek 231-232. Plato, Republic Books 1-2, 6-7. Three periods 
a week. Six credits. Mr. Sherwood. 
Latin 

Latin 111- 112— Elementary Latin. 

For students who enter college with no training in Latin or with fewer 
than two units in high school Latin. The essentials of Latin grammar and 
composition; translations from Caesar and other writers. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. Staff. 

Latin 113- 114— Intermediate Latin. 

Prerequisite: Latin 111-112 or two units of high school Latin. Readings 
from Cicero (orations, letters, essays), Pliny, and later writers; Virgil's 
Aeneid (Books I-VI); forms and syntax. Three periods a week. Six credits. 
Miss Cox. 

Latin 211- 212— Survey of Latin Literature. 

Prerequisite: Latin 113-114 or four units of high school Latin. A survey of 
the great periods of Latin literature with readings from the representative 
works in drama, poetry, history, and letters. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. Miss Cox. 

Latin 213, 214- Medieval Latin. 

Prerequisite: Latin 113-114 or comparable high school preparation. May 
be elected as 300 level course with approval of professor and chairman of 
department. Three periods a week. Three or six credits. (Not offered in 
1969-70). 

Latin 311— Roman Drama. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. A study of the Roman theatre, Plautus, Terence, 
and Seneca. Three periods a week. First semester. Three credits. (Not offered 
in 1969-70.) 



Ill 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Latin 312- Roman Satire. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. The development of satire in Latin literature. 
Lucilius, Horace, Phaedrus, Seneca, Petronius, Persius, Martial, Juvenal. 
Three periods a week. Second semester. Three credits. (Not offered in 1969-70.) 



Latin 315— Roman Historians. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. Roman historical writing. Sallust, Caesar, 
Livy, Tacitus. Three periods a week. First semester. Three credits. Miss 
Cox. 

Latin 316— Epic Poetry. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. Three developments of the epic in Latin. 
Lucretius, Vergil, Lucan. Three periods a week. Second semester. Three 
credits. (Not offered in 1969-70.) 

Latin 351, 352- 

Advanced Latin Grammar and Prose Composition. May be elected for 
one credit each semester. Recommended for all majors who plan to teach. 
Staff. 

Latin 411— The Ciceronian Age. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. Roman life and letters in the last years of the 
Roman Republic. Cicero, Caesar, Catullus, Lucretius, Livy. Three periods a 
week. First semester. Three credits. (Not offered in 1969-70.) 



112 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Latin 412— The Silver Age of Latin Literature. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. A study of the writers of the first and second 
centuries A.D. Special attention is given to Pliny the Younger, Quintilian, 
Statius, and Apuleius. Three periods a week. Second Semester. Three credits. 
Miss Cox. 

Latin 451, 452— Special studies in Latin Literature. 

This course will offer an opportunity for reading and study of an in- 
dependent nature. The subject matter will be worked out in advance by the 
faculty member in charge for a given semester in consultation with the stu- 
dents. Open only to junior and senior major students (or to other qualified 
advanced students) who have completed Latin 211-212 and at least one 
course at a 300 or 400 level. Three credits each semester. May be elected 
for as many as 6 succeeding semesters. Staff. 



Classical Civilization 

Classics 201 — Greek Literature in Translation. 

No prerequisite. Reading in English translation from the major Greek 
writers from Homer through the Greek writers of the Roman period. This 
course cannot be used to fulfill the language requirement. Three periods a 
week. Three credits. Mr. Sherwood. 



Classics 202— Latin Literature in Translation. 

No prerequisite. Readings in English translation from the major Latin 
writers. This course cannot be used to fulfill the language requirements. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Sherwood. 



Classics 301- Mythology. 

No prerequisite. A study of the principal myths in classical writers with 
emphasis on their influence on literature and art in contemporary and later 
periods. This course cannot be used to fulfill the language requirement. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. (Not offered in 1969-70.) 

Classics 331— Greek Civilization. 

(May be elected as History 331.) See History Department listing. Three 
periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Sherwood. 

Classics 332— Roman Civilization. 

(May be elected as History 332.) See History Department listing. Three 
periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Sherwood. 

Classics 385— Greek Art and Archaeology. 

(May be elected as Art 385.) See Art Department listing. Three periods 
a week. Three credits Mrs. Sumner. 

Classics 386— Roman Art and Archaeology. 

(May be elected as Art 386.) See Art Department listing. Three periods a 
week. Three credits. Mrs. Sumner. 



Classics 401, 402— Special Studies in Classical Archaeology. 

Prerequisites: Classics (Art) 385 and 386; some knowledge of Latin and/or 
Greek. Work of the first semester will concentrate on modern archaeological 
techniques; preservation and restoration of finds; introduction to Greek 
and Roman epigraphy. Second semester work will concentrate on Greek 
and Roman numismatics; special studies in Greek and Roman pottery; the 
problems of artifacts and minor arts. Permission of the instructor required. 
Two periods a week. Two credits each semester. Mrs. Sumner. 



113 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



DRAMATIC ARTS AND SPEECH/ Professor Albert R. Klein, 
Chairman; Professor Kenvin; Assistant Professors Duke, Turgeon. 



The major program in dramatic arts and speech requires thirty- 
six credit hours selected from courses in this department numbered 
300 or higher, but as many as twelve hours may be selected in 
related fields. Speech 231, 232, Oral Interpretation, is prerequisite 
to a departmental major and may not be included as part of the 
required twenty-four hours in dramatic arts and speech courses. 
Related fields should be selected from the areas of language, litera- 
ture, history, science, art, music, psychology, or philosophy in 
consultation with the student's adviser. 

A major program in speech pathology and audiology is offered 
in cooperation with the University of Virginia. (See page 91.) 



114 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Dramatic Arts 211, 212- World Drama. 

A study of selected plays and theatrical developments in ancient and modern 
civilizations. Theatre excursions may be arranged. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. Staff. 

Dramatic Arts 311, 312— Stagecraft. 

Construction and design of play production, including theatre design, 
staging, lighting, and sound effects, with practical application in College 
Theatre. One single and two double periods a week. Three credits each semes- 
ter. Mr. Turgeon. 

Dramatic Arts 321, 312- Acting. 

General principles of acting; elementary work in voice and pantomine; 
development and characterization; advanced problems in rehearsal and public 
performance. Two one-and-one half periods a week. Three credits each semes- 
ter. Mr. Kenvin. 

Dramatic Arts 331, 332- Play 'writing. 

The writing of long and short plays or television scripts. Consideration 
of character development, plot structure, dialogue, and critical analysis. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in alternate 
years; not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Kenvin. 

Dramatic Arts 341— History of the Costume. 

History and design of stage costuming. Three periods a week for the 
first semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years; not offered in 1969- 
70.) Mr. Klein. 

Dramatic Arts 361, 362-History of the Theatre. 

A study of theatre history from the classical Greek to the present, in- 
cluding the place of the theatre in the social, cultural, and philosophical 
framework of the period. Theatre design, conventions, the actor and audience 
related to the literature of the theatre. Three periods a week. Three credits 
each semester. Mr. Turgeon. 

Dramatic Arts 371— Oriental Theatre. 

A study of the dramatic literature, theatre and dance of the Orient. 
Analysis of the plays in the Classic Chinese, Indian, and Japanese theatres, 
within their artistic and historical settings. Analysis of the conventions and 
styles of the theatre and dance of the East. Three periods each week for the 
first semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years; offered in 1969-70.) 
Mr. Klein. 



Dramatic Arts 431 , 432— Directing. 

History, technique, and practice of directing the long and short play. 
Problems of high school, college, and community theatre. Three periods a 
week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Klein. 



Dramatic Arts 441— Dramatic Criticism. 

Analysis of dramatic criticism from Aristotle to the present. Application 
to representative plays. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three 
credits. Mr. Kenvin. 

Dramatic Arts 443— Children's Theatre. 

Staging and production of plays for children. Dramatization of original 
and adapted literature. Creative dramatics. Three periods a week. Three 
credits. (Offered in alternate years; not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Klein. 

Dramatic Arts 451, 452— Special Studies in Speech and Dramatic Arts. 

Open to all Dramatic Arts and Speech majors and otherwise qualified 
students of junior and senior status who desire special studies in the area of 
speech or dramatic arts. The emphasis will be upon either intensive reading 
in the field of speech or drama or creative application of advanced dramatic 
arts or speech theories. By permission of the department. Staff. 

Dramatic Arts 461— Seminar in Dramatic Arts 

Selected readings, oral presentation, and discussion. Two one-and-one half 
periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Klein. 

Dramatic Arts 491, 492— Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three to 
six credits. By permission of the Department. 

Speech 231, 232- Oral Interpretation. 

A study of the fundamentals of voice production and clarity of diction 
as an aid to effective communication. Interpretation of prose, poetry, and 
dramatic literature in terms of its intellectual, emotional, and aesthetic con- 
tent. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Duke, Mr. 
Klein. 

Speech 251, 252 +- Speech Fundamentals Laboratory. 

A functional course in reading and speaking, affording practice in basic 
speech skills. Emphasis is placed on individual speech problems and on the 
improvement of vocal delivery. Not credited toward a major in Dramatic 
Arts and Speech. No credit if Speech 231, 232 is taken for credit. One 
period a week. One credit each semester. Mr. Duke. 

Speech 301— Group Discussion. 

A study of the philosophy and practice of group discussion as a means of 
problem-solving and the exercise of group leadership. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years; offered in 1969-70.) 
Mr. Duke. 



115 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Speech 302- Public Speaking. 

A study of the art of public speaking, the organization and delivery of 
speeches of various types, and an examination of the history and theories 
of rhetoric. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in 
alternate years; offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Duke. 



Speech 421— Voice Science. 

A study of the anatomical, physiological, and neurological functioning 
of the speech and hearing mechanisms and speech problems resulting from 
the impairment of these systems. Three periods a week. Three credits each 
semester. (Offered in alternate years; not offered in 1969-70.) Mr Duke. 

Speech 422- Phonetics. 

A study of American dialects and standards of speech employing the Inter- 
national Phonetic Alphabet. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 
(Offered in alternate years; not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Duke. 

See also Cooperative Program in Speech Pathology and Audiology, page 91. 



116 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE/ Professor Henry 
W. Hewetson, Chairman; Professors Fickett, R. E. Sumner ; 
Associate Professor Miller; Assistant Professors Fingerhut,Kof- 
fman; Instructor Whisler; Visiting Lecturer Williams. 

Economics 

A major program in Economics requires the completion of 
thirty-six credit hours. At least twenty-four of these hours must be 
in Economics courses other than Economics 201-202, Principles 
of Economics. (It will be noted that Economics 201-202 is a pre- 
requisite for most of the Economics courses.) Of the twenty-four 
hours, Economics 321, Money and Banking, Economics 371, 
Microeconomics, and either Economics 322, a continuation of 
Money and Banking, or Economics 372, Macroeconomics, are 
required. The remaining twelve hours may be selected from addi- 
tional courses in Economics or other social sciences as approved. 



Economics 201 , 202- Principles of Economics. 

A study of facts and fundamental principles relating to the production, 
exchange, distribution, and consumption of goods and services for the satis- 
faction of human wants, including some consideration of basic economic 
institutions and systems. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Hewetson, 
Miss Whisler. 



Economics 21 1- 212 +— American Industry. 

The economic characteristics of American industry as a whole and of 
particular major industries. No prerequisite. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. Mr. Miller. 



Economics 221-222— Introductory Accounting. 

A study of the fundamental accounting principles and practices involved 
in the recording and interpretation of accounting data. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. Mr. Miller. 



Economics 321-322— Money and Banking. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. Theory of money and credit, banking 
organization and practices, foreign exchange, international movement of capi- 
tal, and the financial aspects of business cycles. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. Miss Whisler. 

Economics 341-342— Government Finance. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. Expenditures and revenues of federal, 
state, and local governments, the problems of shifting and incidence of taxes; 
the public debt and fiscal administration. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. Mr. Miller. 

Economics 351-352— Labor Economics. 

A study of manpower, the labor force, and the organized labor movement. 
Three credits each semester. (Not offered in 1968-69.) Mr. Miller. 

Economics 311— Microeconomics. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. Analysis of the firm and the household 
and their interactions, involving cost, utility, price, wage, interest, rent, and 
profit theory. Three periods a week for first semester. Three credits. Mr. 
Hewetson. 



Economics 372— Macroeconomics. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. National income accounts and aggregate 
economic analysis. Three periods a week for second semester. Three credits. 
Mr. Hewetson. 

Economics 381— Personal Finance. 

Budgeting, borrowing, installment buying, insurance, home owning, taxes, 
and estate planning. Three hours a week for first semester. Three credits. 
Mr. Hewetson. 



117 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Economics 382— Investment Economics. 

The principles that should be observed in the selection of securities for 
investment. Three periods a week for second semester. Three credits. Mr. 
Hewetson. 

Economics 391— Comparative Economic Systems. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. The nature of capitalism, socialism, 
communism, and fascism and the state of economic society in the various 
areas of the world. Three periods a week for first semester. Three credits. 
(Offered in alternate years.) 



Economics 392— Economic Development. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. An examination of the problems of 
accelerating economic development in poor countries and maintaining develop- 
ment in rich countries. This study will progress from the viewpoints of theory, 
history and policy in attempting to explain the forces that give long period 
growing power to an economy. Three periods a week for second semester. 
Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1968-69.) 



Economics 401- 402— International Economics. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. World economic resources, international 
trade, and economic problems in international relationships. Three periods 
a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered 
in 1968-69.) Miss Whisler. 

Economics 441-442— History of Economic Thought. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. Survey of ancient and medieval economic 
thought; the Physiocrats and the mercantilists; the classical and neo-classical 
economics; and trends in economic thought since the middle of the nineteenth 
century. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in 
alternate years. Offered in 1968-69.) Miss Whisler. 

Economics 471-472— Seminar in Economics. 

Directed individual research on an approved problem in economics. Three 
credits. 



118 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Political Science 

For a major in Political Science the requirements are twenty- 
four credits in political science and twelve credits in related sub- 
jects, in addition to six hours in Political Science 201-202. 
The major program must include Political Science 441 and Political 
Science 442. The related subjects may be selected from additional 
courses in Political Science or other social sciences as approved. 

Political Science 201— 202— American Government. 

The principles of political science as applied to American national govern- 
ment, state governments, and local government. Six credits. Staff. 



Political Science 212— The American Presidency. 

An analysis of a fluid institution in a going political system. Stress will 
be placed on the evolution of the modern presidency and its relationship to 
democratic theory. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three 
credits. Mr. Sumner. 

Political Science 301 — Comparative Government I. 

A comparative analysis of the governments of the United Kingdom, France, 
and West Germany. First semester. Three credits. Mr. Fickett. 

Political Science 302— Comparative Government II. 

A comparative analysis of the governments of the Soviet Union and 
Eastern Europe. Second semester. Three credits. Mr. Fingerhut. 



Political Science 304— Problems in Contemporary American Politics. 

An in-depth analysis of selected problems in contemporary American politics. 
The course will be conducted as a seminar with emphasis on independent 
student research. Permission of the instructor is required for admission. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 



Political Science 311, 312— Public Administration. 

The administrative aspects of government, problems of organization, fiscal 
control, administrative control, and a study of employment relations with 
personnel administration. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Sumner. 

Political Science 313— Congress and the Political Process. 
An analysis of the legislative process in the United States, focused on the 
contemporary role of Congress in its relation with the Presidency, the federal 
bureaucracy, and pressure groups. Three periods a week for the first semester. 
Three credits. Staff. 

Political Science 321— Theory of International Politics. 
An analysis of contemporary theory in international politics, including an 
evaluation of the United Nations and other international organizations. First 
semester. Three credits. Mr. Fickett. 

Political Science 322- Problems in International Politics. 

A continuation of 321, focusing on the major contemporary problems in 
international politics such as Vietnam, the Middle East, European integration, 
and the Cold War. Second semester. Three credits. Mr. Fickett. 



Political Science 332— Municipal Government. 

The government of American cities and other local areas. Three credits. 
Mr. Sumner. 

Political Science 334— Political Parties. 

The structure and functions of political parties; the conduct of elections; 
pressure groups. Three credits. Mr. Sumner. 



119 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Political Science 341-342— Government Finance. 

Same as Economics 341-342— Government Finance. Expenditures and re- 
venues of federal, state, and local governments, the problems of taxes, the 
public debt and fiscal administration. Three periods a week. Six credits. 
Mr. Miller. 



Political Science 351- Political Problems of Latin America. 

A comparative analysis of the problems of political development con- 
fronting the nations of Latin America. Appropriate consideration will be given 
to the closely related problems of general development. Three periods a week 
for first semester. Three credits. Mr. Koffman. 



Political Science 353— Politics of Middle and Southern Africa. 

The development of nationalism, the drives for independence, and the 
problems and politics of nation-building of the newly-independent sub- 
Saharan states. The politics of the white-controlled areas of southern Africa. 
Regional groupings. Pan-Africanism and other international aspects of Africa 
politics. Three credits. Mr. Fingerhut. 



Political Science 354— Politics of South Asia. 

A study of the political development of India and Pakistan. Problems in 
the economic and social development of these nations will be analyzed as 
related. Three credits. Mr. Fickett. 



Political Science 355— Politics of North Africa and the Middle East. 

A study of the political development of the nations of North Africa 
and the Middle East. Emphasis will be given to the development of new 
political institutions in these areas. Three credits. Mr. Fickett. 

Political Science 356— American Foreign Policy. 

Persistent problems facing the United States in its search for national 
security and international stability and progress; emphasis on our foreign 
policy since World War II. Three credits. Mr. Sumner. 



120 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Political Science 361- Problems of Communism. 

A study of the origins, development and contemporary aspects of world 
Communism. The evolution of "communist" thought: Marx, Engels, Lenin, 
Stalin, Mao, and post-Stalin Communist writings. The history and develop- 
ment of Communism as a political movement. The Soviet and Chinese 
experiences. Communism in the non-Western world. The Sino-Soviet con- 
flict, Eastern Europe and other major features and issues of contemporary 
world communism. Second semester. Three credits. Mr. Fingerhut. 

Political Science 422— American Constitutional Development. 

This will be an intensive analysis of the Supreme Court of the United 
States and its opinions, from the following viewpoints— legal, political, and 
behavioral. Three periods a week for second semester. Mr. Fickett. 



Political Science 443— Modern Political Analysis. 

A study of the theories and applications of modern political analysis. 
Emphasis will be placed upon the behavioral approach to politics. Three 
credits. Mr. Fingerhut. 

Political Science 462— Geopolitics. 

An examination and evaluation of geographic factors affecting world 
power struggles and international relations. Three periods a week. Three 
credits. (Same as Geography 462.) 

Political Science 481— Independent Study in Political Science. 
Directed individual research on approved problems in political science. 
Three credits. Staff. 



Political Science 491— Problems in Political Economy. 

Open to all political science majors and otherwise qualified students of 
junior and senior status who desire to become more familiar with the litera- 
ture of political science in a field selected by the instructor after consultation 
with the students. Approval of instructor is required. The emphasis is on 
intensive reading with group discussions of the selections read. Three periods 
a week. Three credits. Mr. Williams. 



Political Economy and Public Affairs 

A major program in Political Economy and Public Affairs re- 
quired the student to take Economics 201-202, Principles of 
Economics, and Political Science 201-202, American Government. 
In addition to the above courses, the student must take fifteen 
credit hours in Economics and fifteen credit hours in Political 
Science selected from courses offered by the Department. These 
courses are to be chosen so as to provide the student with a 
foundation in either domestic or international public affairs. 

Typewriting 

The courses do not carry college credit and are designed pri- 
marily to develop skill in typewriting for personal use. Proper 
techniques of typewriting and a mastery of the keyboard are 
developed. To facilitate registration, the following course numbers 
have been assigned: 

Typewriting 121-122— 

Three periods a week. No credit. Mr. Miller. 



EDUCATION/ Assistant Prof essor Paul Slayton, Chairman; Pro- 
fessor Alvey; Associate Professor Merchent; Assistant Professors 
Holmes, Hook. 

The courses necessary for obtaining certification as a teacher 
in either elementary or secondary schools are available as electives 
to students at Mary Washington College. These courses are de- 
signed primarily to meet certification requirements for teaching in 
Virginia. 

To fulfill the graduation requirements of the college and the 
certification requirements for the state, the faculty adviser and the 
student should plan the four-year academic program with care. 
Where it is possible, college and certification requirements should 
be overlapped to avoid amassing a surplus of credit hours. 



121 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Certification Requirements For Grades One Through Seven. 

To be certified the student must complete the degree require- 
ments and may select any major program offered by the college. 

To meet the minimum requirements to teach in the elementary 
schools, students must complete courses in two areas: general 
education, and professional education: 



General Education 

A minimum of sixty semester hours of course work distributed 
so that the following specific requirements are met: 

1. Humanities Semester hours 
English (including courses in composition and 

children' s literature 18 

Foreign Language 6 

2. Social Science 

American History 6 

Economics 3 

Electives (from history, economics, general 

psychology, political science and sociology. 

Geography and world history are recommended) 9 

3. Natural Science 8 

4. Mathematics 6 

5. Art and Music 6 

6. Physical Education or its equivalent and Health 4 

Professional Education 

1 . Psychology 

[^ Psy 331, Developmental Psychology: Child 

Development 3 

Psy 332, Developmental Psychology: Adolescent 

Development 3 

(Psy 362, The Exceptional Child can be substituted for 
either of the above) 

2. Education 312, Teaching in the Elementary School 
(to be taken during either semester of junior 
year 3 

3. Education 420, Foundations of Education (to be 
taken concurrently with Ed. 440, Student 
Teaching) 3 

4. Education 440, Student Teaching (See Student 
Teaching, pp 128) 6 

For students who prefer a more highly specialized preparation 
for elementary school teaching leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Education, a special program in cooperation with 
the School of Education at the University of Virginia is offered. 
(See Cooperative Program in Elementary Education, page 91.) 

Certification Requirements For Secondary School Subjects. 

To meet requirements to teach a subject in the secondary 
school, students must complete credits in general education, in 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



professional education, and in the subject to be taught. Moreover, 
it is recommended that all students preparing to teach take a 
course in speech and basic economics to satisfy in part the general 
education requirements. 

General Education Semester hours 

1 . Humanities 12 

English Composition 3 

Electives (from foreign language, literature, 
speech, fine arts, music and philosophy) 9 

2 . Social Science 12 

American History 6 

Electives (from history, sociology, economics, 
political science, geography, and general 
psychology— recommended: general 

psychology) 6 

3. Laboratory Science and Mathematics 12 

(at least one course in each area) 

4. Health and Physical Education 4 




123 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



K$tt£. :^iXMm 



124 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Professional Education 

1. Psychology (in addition to general psychology) 3 

Psy 332, Developmental Psychology: Adolescent 
Development is strongly recommended. 

2. 300 level education course appropriate to subject area. 3 

(to be taken during either semester of junior year) 

3. Education 420, Foundations of Education (to be taken 

concurrently with Education 440, Student teaching. 3 

4. Education 440, Student Teaching 6 

(see Student Teaching, Page 128) 

Areas of Specialization 

The minimum hours required in the subject taught on the 
secondary level are itemized below and may include any hours 
that have been included in the general education requirements. 
However, a student should major in the subject she wishes to 
teach so that an adequate depth and background are assured. 
Student teaching in the secondary school will be permitted only 
in the student's major subject. 

Art 30 

Distribution in art courses as follows: 

a. Design, drawing, painting, graphics 12 

b. Sculpture... 6 

c. Ceramics and crafts 6 

d. History and Appreciation of Art 6 

English 30 

Shall include courses in English literature, American 
literature, language and composition. Should include also 
a course in advanced composition writing and a course in 
modern English Grammar. 
(NOTE: The English major may be certified to teach 
speech and/ or dramatics with six hours credit in either 
of those disciplines.) 

Semester hours 

Dramatics 12 

Speech 12 

Foreign Language 30 

Shall include thirty semester hours of language and litera- 
ture including the beginning, intermediate, and other 
courses which may have been taken prior to college study. 
(Note: For endorsement in a second foreign language the 
student must present twenty-four hours of credit in that 
language.) 



Latin 24 

(NOTE: For endorsement in Latin as a second language 
or in addition to English the applicant must present eight- 
teen semester hours of Latin language and literature, 
including the beginning, intermediate, and other courses 
which may have been taken prior to college study.) 
Mathematics 

a. All High School Mathematics 27 

(NOTE: Shall include a course in analytic geometry and 
calculus and should include courses in modern algebra, 
geometry, probability, and/ or statistics.) 

b. Teachers of the Following Subjects Only 16 

(eighth and ninth grade arithmetic, consumer mathematics, 
basic mathematics, and business mathematics) 

Music, 36 

a. Performance 18 

b. Basic Musical Knowledge 18 

History and the Social Sciences ...42 

The credit shall be distributed as follows: 

a. History 18 

b. Government 12 125 

c. Economics 6 TOtTr^F 

d. Geography 6 tUURbb 

To teach a specific social science subject, the student must OFFERINGS 

complete the following minimums: 

a. History (selected from not less than two of the 
following: American history, ancient history, and 
contemporary affairs) 24 

b. Economics 18 

c. Geography 18 

d. Political Science 18 

e. Sociology 18 

Science 

a. Biology 24 

Shall include a laboratory course in introductory biology. 
In addition a year's course in organic chemistry, physics, 
and mathematics should be completed. 

b. Chemistry 24 

Shall include courses in general principles and organic, 
analytical, and physical chemistry. In addition a year's 
course in biology, physics and mathematics should be 
completed. 



126 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



c. Earth Science 24 

Shall include a year's course in general college geology 
and a semester's course in each of two of the following: 
astronomy, meteorology, oceanography and physical 
geography. 

d. General Science 24 

The student must present credit in at least three science 
fields: biology, chemistry, physics or earth science. 

e. Physics 20 

Physics , alternate endorsement 16 

(All persons with a college major in astronomy or with 
endorsement in biology, chemistry, or mathematics 
(all high school subjects) shall be endorsed in physics with 
sixteen semester hours in physics, eight semester hours 
of which must be in courses above the introductory 
level which use calculus.) 

Qualified applicants may wish to enter the Internship Program 
for Prospective Teachers leading to the Master of Arts in Teaching 
degree offered by the University of Virginia. (See description of 
the program on page 94) 

Education 312— Teaching in the Elementary School. 

The purposes and organization of the elementary school and its cur- 
riculum; subject content and instructional methods related to child growth 
and development with emphasis on the teaching of reading, classroom manage- 
ment and evaluation of pupil progress. Mrs. Hook. 



Education 332— The Teaching of Foreign Languages. 

The principles and techniques of teaching modern and classical languages 
in the secondary school. Some important areas developed are: selecting 
materials of instruction in foreign languages, planning and guiding learning 
experiences, and appraising the results of the teaching-learning process. Mr. 
Alvey. 

Education 342— Seminar in Art Education. 

Designed for students who expect to teach art, but open to other art 
majors. Study of the scope and place of the visual arts in the world today; 
of adult and child attitudes and aptitudes; the development of a philosophy 
toward creative work, some practice in organizing a flexible and workable 
program for future teaching or study. Mr. Johnson. 



Education 352— The Teaching of Mathematics. 

Consideration of principles and techniques of teaching and materials of 
instruction for teaching mathematics in the secondary school. Some important 
areas developed are: planning and guiding learning experience in mathematics 
and appraising the results of the teaching-learning process. Mr. Holmes. 



Education 362— The Teaching of Music. 

(See Music 311-312 in the listing of courses of the Music Department.) 
Completion of this course suffices to fill the teaching of subject require- 
ment for certification purposes. 

Education 372— The Teaching of the Social Sciences. 

The purposes and organization of the secondary social science curriculum; 
subject matter content and instructional methods in the various social sciences. 
Some important areas developed are: planning and guiding learning ex- 
periences in social science and appraising the results of the teaching-learning 
process. Staff. 



Education 382- The Teaching of the Sciences. 

The purposes and organization of the secondary science curriculum; sub- 
ject matter content and instructional methods in the various sciences. Some 
important areas developed are: planning and guiding learning experiences 
in science and appraising the results of the teaching-learning process. Mr. 
Holmes. 

Education 392— The Teaching of English, Speech & Dramatics. 

The purposes and organization of the secondary language arts curricula; 
subject matter content and instructional methods related to the development 
of language skills and tastes during the adolescent years. Consideration of 
principles, techniques, and materials of instruction for teaching English, 
Speech, and Dramatics in the secondary school. Mr. Slayton. 

Education 420— Foundations of Education. 

(To be taken concurrently with Education 440.) An analysis of the role 
of education in the United States. Major emphasis in this course are the 
surveys of the contributions of the foundation disciplines to theory and 
practice in American schools: history of education, cultural anthropology, 
sociology, philosophy, psychology of learning, political science and economics. 
Staff. 



127 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Education 440— Supervised Teaching. 

Prerequisite: appropriate three-hundred level course in education. Orienta- 
tion to teaching under direction of supervisors in public elementary and 
secondary schools in three different geographic localities: the Richmond 
area, the Fredericksburg area, and the Northern Virginia area. Includes 
practical experience in the classroom, laboratory, and field activities, as 
well as other aspects of the total school program. Other regulations governing 
acceptance into supervised teaching are found below. Offered each semester. 
Six credits. Mr. Alvey, Mr. Holmes, Mrs. Hook, Mr. Luntz, Mr. Merchant, 
Mr. Slayton. 




Supervised Teaching 

Facilities for student teaching in both elementary and secondary 
schools are available in three localities: the Richmond area, the 
Fredericksburg area, and the Northern Virginia area. Under the 
cooperative arrangements in effect, students in their senior year 
are assigned to specific classes for observation, participation, and 
teaching responsibilities under the guidance and supervision of 
experienced teachers. Supervised teaching is available in the high 
school academic subjects and in the elementary grades, as well as 
in art and music. 

Students seeking certification should reserve one semester of 

the senior year primarily for student teaching. During that semester 

„ the student should enroll for Education 440, Student Teaching, 

and Education 420, Foundations of Education. A total of twelve 

COURSE hours will be considered a normal load of courses during the 

OFFFRTNTr^ student teaching semester; therefore, only one other course may 

be taken during the period the student is enrolled in Education 
420 and Education 440. (For student teachers choosing assignment 
in the Richmond and Northern Virginia areas, the Education 
420 course will be taught in those areas by members of the Mary 
Washington College Department of Education. Arrangements for 
the additional course may be made through colleges in those 
areas.) 

For assignment to supervised teaching, students must meet the 
eligibility requirements, which include (a) senior status; (b) an 
average of at least "C" in general and in the major field; and 
(c) aptitude for the profession. Secondary school teachers must 
major in the subject they plan to teach as well as meet the above 
requirements. Enrollment is by permission of the Department of 
Education and is contingent on the availability of space in the 
cooperating school divisions. Transportation to and from the 
cooperating school is the responsibility of the student. Students 
applying for positions in supervised teaching should submit the 
appropriate application forms to the Department of Education by 
May 1 of their junior year at Mary Washington College for 
assignments the following session. 



ENGLISH/ Professor Sidney H. Mitchell, Chairman; Professors 
Croushore, B. W. Early, Griffith, W. B. Kelly, Simpson, 
Whidden, D. H. Woodward; Associate Professors Brown, 
Glover, N. H. Mitchell; Assistant Professors Finnegan, Flem- 
ing, Hanna, Patton; Instructors Dervin,M. S. Early, Fellowes, 
Hansen, Lutterbie, Rankin, Singh. 



English 1 1 1 is prerequisite to all other English courses. 

Students choosing to major in English must take at least twenty- 
four credits in English courses numbered 300 or higher and twelve 
credits in related fields, in addition to the twelve hours of English 
listed in the degree requirements. The twenty-four hours in ad- 
vanced English courses must include six hours in courses numbered 
300 to 326; six hours in courses numbered 335 to 366; six hours 
in 400 courses. 

In the spring of their senior year majors are required to pass 
a written examination in English and American literature in order 
to complete their major program. This comprehensive examination 
is designed to encourage majors to assimilate material from classes, 
independent study, and personal reading and to offer them an 
opportunity to display a comprehensive knowledge of literary 
trends and theories. A copy of sample questions is in the Reserve 
Room in the Library, and departmental advisers can provide addi- 
tional information on request. 

A distinguished performance on the comprehensive in addition 
to a high level of achievement in the major program, will entitle 
majors to be graduated with "Honors in English." 

It is recommended that English majors who plan to do graduate 
work take two foreign languages, preferably French and German. 

The twelve credits of related study are to be selected, with the 
approval of the student's adviser, from among the courses numbered 
200 or higher in the following departments; six credits must be 
offered from a single department; the remaining six must be 
offered from one or more other departments: 

Art (courses in Art History) 

Classics 

Dramatic Arts (courses in dramatic literature) 

History 

Languages 

Liberal Arts Seminars 

Music (courses in the history and literature of music) 

Philosophy (except Philosophy 411) 

Religion (including Religion 101, 102) 



129 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



English 111- Composition and Reading. 

The mechanics of writing and an introduction to literature. To earn credit 
for the course, the student must have a passing average in her theme pro- 
gram. Three credits. Staff. 

English 205— Children 's Literature. 

A study of the various sections of children's literature— fables; myths; 
folk and hero stories; poetry. Open to juniors and seniors only. Three credits 
each semester. Mrs. Early. 

English 231— Short Fiction. 
A study of selected short stories and short novels. Three credits. Staff. 

English 232- The Novel. 

A study of the form, content, and development of selected novels. Three 
credits. Staff. 

English 233- Poetry. 
A close analysis of poetic form and content. Three credits. Staff. 



130 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



English 234— Shakespeare. 

A study of Shakespeare's achievement in selected plays and poems. Three 
credits. (No additional credit will be allowed for English 425, 426.) Staff. 

English 235- Tragedy. 

Tragedy as form and idea reflected in selected literary and dramatic works 
of world literature. Three credits. Staff. 



English 236— Comedy. 

A study of comic conventions in selected works of world literature. Three 
credits. Staff. 

English 305— The English Language. 

The structure and history of the English language. Three credits for the 
first semester. Mrs. Mitchell. 

English 308- Old and Middle English Literature in Translation. 

A study of some of the major works and genres of Anglo-Saxon and 
Middle English literature, including lyric, heroic and romance narratives 
and drama. Knowledge of the languages is not required. Three credits tor 
the second semester. Mrs. Mitchell. 



English 315, 316+- The English Renaissance. 

The non-dramatic poetry and prose of the Elizabethan, Jacobean, and 
Caroline periods. Three credits each semester. Mr. Woodward. 



English 325, 326+- Eighteenth Century Literature, 1660-1800. 

A study of the main types of literature in England from the Restoration 
through the eighteenth century, with particular attention to the development 
of neoclassical values and their decline and the rise of romanticism. Three 
credits each semester. Mr. Kelly. 

English 335, 336+— Nineteenth Century English Literature. 

First semester, Romantic poetry and prose; second semester, Victorian 
poetry and prose. Three credits each semester. Mr. Brown, Mr. Early, 
Miss Hanna. 

English 355, 356+— Nineteenth Century American Literature. 

First semester, literary romanticism in American prose and poetry; second 
semester, literary realism in American prose and poetry. Three credits each 
semester. Mr. Fleming, Mr. Griffith. 

English 365, 366+- Modern Literature. 

A comparative study of important European, British, and American authors 
from 1885 to the present. Three credits each semester. Mr. Dervin. 



English 375, 376 +- Special Studies. 
Studies in significant literary figures, movements, topics. 
1969-1970 (1st semester) American Negro Literature. Mr. Singh 
1969-1970 (2nd semester) Contemporary European 

Fiction Mr. Lutterbie 

1970-1971 (1st semester) American Negro Literature. Mr. Singh 
1970-1971 (2nd semester) Contemporary European 

Fiction Mr. Lutterbie 

Three credits each semester. 



131 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



English 406— Workshop in Writing. 

Practice in creative expression. Admission by consent of the instructor. 
Three credits for the first semester. Mr. Fellowes. 

English 409— Literary Criticism. 

A study of literary criticism from Plato to the present with emphasis on 
forms other than drama. Readings and class discussions will focus on both 
historical developments in literary theory and examples of critical practice. 
Three credits for the first semester. Mr. Glover. 



English 415, 416+- The Novel. 

Development of the novel in England and America. Three credits 
each semester. Mr. Singh, Mr. Glover. 

English 417, 418- English Drama. 

The origin and development of drama from the Middle Ages. First 
semester, Middle Ages to the Restoration; second semester, the Restoration 
to the present. Three credits each semester. Miss Finnegan, Mr. Early 




English 422— Chaucer. 

Chaucer's literary backgrounds and his major works. Three credits. 
Rankin. 



Miss 



English 425, 426 + — Shakespeare. 

Shakespeare's development as a dramatist. Three credits each semester. Mr. 
Mitchell, Mr. Whidden. 

English 436— Seventeenth Century Studies. 

Intensive study of significant figures, movements, or problems in the litera- 
ture of the seventeenth century. Three credits for the second semester. 
Miss Finnegan. 



132 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



English 445- Eighteenth Century Studies. 

Intensive study of significant figures, movements, or problems in the litera- 
ture of the eighteenth century. Three credits for the first semester. Mr. 
Kelly. 

English 455- Nineteenth Century English Studies. 

Intensive study of significant figures, movements, or problems in nineteenth 
century English literature. Three credits for the first semester. Miss Hanna. 



English 466- Twentieth Century English Studies. 

An intensive study of a few modern writers. Three credits for the second 
semester. Mr. Brown. 

English 475- Nineteenth Century American Studies. 

Intensive investigation of significant literary figures, movements, or pro- 
blems in nineteenth century American literature. Three credits for the first 
semester. Mr. Glover. 

English 486— Twentieth Century American Studies. 

Intensive investigation of significant literary figures, movements, or problems 
in twentieth century American literature. Three credits for the second semester. 
Mr. Croushore. 



English 490, 491, 492, 493- Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. From three 
to twelve hours, not more than six to be taken in the junior year. Three to 
twelve credits. (By permission of the department.) 



GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY/ Professor Samuel T. Emory, 
Chairman; Professor Bird; Assistant Professor Bowen. 

Geography 

A student wishing to major in geography and geology must 
take a total of thirty-six semester hours in addition to Geology 
121-122. Twenty-four hours of this are to be taken in geography 
and geology while the remaining twelve hours are to be taken in 
related fields approved by the department. The total program must 
form a coherent group of courses and must be planned in con- 
sultation with the department. 

Courses counted toward filling any of the basic or area re- 
quirements for a degree cannot be counted also a part of the 
major program requirements. 

Geography 212— World Geography. 

A study of the world by regions, with emphasis on the cultural differences 
among nations. Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 



Geography 321- Geography of Europe. 
A survey of the European continent including the climate, surface features, 
natural resources, population, agriculture, industry, and trade of each 
European nation and the nation's position in the world today. Three periods 
a week. Three credits. Mr. Emory. 

Geography 322— Geography of Anglo-America. 

A survey of the United States and Canada by regions. (New England, 
the South, French Canada, etc.) including the culture, population, industry, 

trade, and natural foundation of each. Three periods a week. Three credits. 
Mr. Bowen. 



133 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Geography 330— Weather and Climate. 

An analysis of weather processes, distribution of climatic regions, the rela- 
tionship between climate, vegetation, and soil regions, and the impact of 
climate upon man's activities. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. 
Bowen. 

Geography 331— Geography of Asia. 

A study of the landforms, climate, boundaries, trade, resources, people, 
and cultural groupings of the continent of Asia. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. Mr. Bowen. 



Geography 333— Geography of Africa. 

A study of the landforms, climate, peoples, boundaries, trade, and cultural 
groupings of the African continent. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. 
Emory. 



134 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Geography 334— Geography of South America. 

A study of landforms, climate, boundaries, trade, resources and cultural 
groupings of South America. Three credits. Staff. 

Geography 335— Geography of Middle America. 

A study of the landforms, climate, boundaries, trade, resources and cultural 
groupings of the Caribbean Islands, Central America, and Mexico. Three 
credits. Staff. 

Geography 400— Special Problems in Geography. 

An independent study of some geographic problem selected in consultation 
with the department. May be repeated for credit. Three credits. Staff. 

Geography 461- Geographical Influences on History. 

A study of the influence of man's physical environment on history, with 
emphasis on American history. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. 
Emory. 

Geography 462— Political Geography. 

A study of geographic factors in world power and international affairs. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Emory. 

Geography 475— Economic Geography. 

A study of the distribution of economic resources, the trade which 
results from these resources, their cause and effect. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. Staff. 

Geography 490— History of Geographic Thought. 

A study of the development of theory, philosophy and methods in geo- 
graphy. Three credits. Staff. 

Geography 491- Cartography. 

A study of methods, theory, and practice of map construction. Three 
credits. Staff. 



Geography 499— Historical Geography of North A merica. 

A study of the geography of selected regions of North America during 
designated periods of history. Emphasis will be placed upon settlement 
geography, historical economic geography, and geographical change through 
time. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Bowen. 



Geology 

Students emphasizing geology may elect to receive a B. S. 
degree by selecting the correct area requirements and related 
field in consultation with the department. 



Geology 121- 122- Introduction to Earth Science. 

The changing earth, the processes that produce change, the history of 
change and how earth history is read. Three single and one double period a 
week. Four credits each semester. Mr. Bird. 

Geology 312— Geomorphology. 

The origin and development of landforms and their relation to underlying 
structure. Three credits. Mr. Bowen. 

Geology 331 — Invertebrate Paleontology. 

Hard and soft part morphology and evolution of major invertebrate 
groups. Three single and one double period a week. Four credits. Mr. 
Bird. 

Geology 332— Mineralogy-Petrology . 

Basic concepts of the solid state of matter; crystal lattices and crystals, 
identification and classification of rocks and minerals; origin and evolution 
of igneous rocks; materials, structure and energy of earth's interior. Three 
single and one double period a week. Four credits. Mr. Bird. 



Geology 351 — Readings in Geology. 

Readings from texts, references, and journals in one of the following: 
Geochemistry; geophysics; sedimentation; vertebrate palentology; andpaleoco- 
logy. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Bird. 

Geology 400— Independent Study in Geology. 

Prerequisite: four semesters of geology. Investigation of a geologic problem 
to be chosen in consultation with instructor. Three credits. Mr. Bird. 



135 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION/ 
Professor Rachel J. Benton, Chairman; Professor Read; Associate 
Professors Arnold, Droste, Greenberg*, Woosley; Assistant 
Professors Darby, Haymes, Henderson; Instructors Dragomano- 
vic, Gardner, Hyde, Kirschner, Ladner, White. 

After June, 1969, the conferring of the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation will be 
discontinued. 

A program leading to the B. A. degree with the major in dance is 
described on page 139. 

The following departmental requirements and recommendations 
should be noted. 

1. Four credits in physical education are required for a degree. 
College credit in physical education is limited to four hours. 



*On leave, 1968-69 



136 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Students are expected to complete the four credits during their 
first two college years. 

2. A student may elect two credits in Health Education. 

3. A student may take courses in dance in excess of the four 
credits allowed in physical education with the written approval of 
the departmental chairman or adviser in the student's major field. 

4. Each student is expected to participate in physical educa- 
tion activities. If a student's health restricts her participation, 
she is expected to take some modified activity. Such students shall 
arrange their physical education work in consultation with the 
chairman of the department. 

5. A student may take any course which the department offers 
on the level for which she is qualified. 

6. Students may not enroll in more than one course in Physical 
Education during a semester without the approval of the Depart- 
ment Chairman. 

7. It is recommended that each student bring with her a pair 
of tennis shoes; dark, solid color, cotton Bermuda shorts; white 
tailored blouse; and leotards. She should also bring a tennis racket 
and golf clubs if she plans to participate in these activities. 

Health Education 

Health Education 100- Health. 

Two periods a week for one semester. Two credits. Staff. 



Physical Education 

Physical Education 101, 102; 201, 202; 301, 302; 401, 402*- Hockey. 

Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 

Physical Education 103, 104; 203, 204; 303, 304; 403, 404- Basketball. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 

Physical Education 105, 106; 205, 206; 305, 306; 405, 406- Volleyball. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 

Physical Education 107, 108; 207, 208; 307, 308; 407, 408-Soccer. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 



Physical Education 109, 110; 209, 210; 309, 310; 409, 4\0-Lacrosse. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 



*100 numbers indicate first level; 200 numbers indicate second level. 



Physical Education 111, 112; 211, 212; 311, 312; 411, 412- Gymnastics. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Miss Hyde, Miss White. 

Physical Education 113, 114; 213, 214; 313, 314; 413, 414- Individual. 
Exercise. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 

Physical Education 115, 116; 215, 216; 315, 316; 415, 416-Swimming. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 

Physical Education 117, 118; 217, 218; 317, 318; 417, 418- Correctives. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 

Physical Education 119- Fundamentals of Movement. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 

Physical Education 120— Introduction to Dance. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 

Physical Education 121, 122; 221, 222; 321, 322; 421, 422- Ballet. 

Three periods a week. One credit. Miss Darby, Miss Dragomanovic, 
Mrs. Gardner. See Dance 121, etc. 



Physical Education 123, 124; 223, 224; 323, 324; 423, 424-Modern Dance. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. See Dance 123, 124, etc. 

Physical Education 125, 126; 225, 226; 325, 326; 425, 426-Tap Dance. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 



137 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Physical Education 127, 128; 227, 228; 327, 328; 427, 428- Folk and 
Three periods a week. One credit. Miss Arnold, Miss Ladner. 
National Dance. 



Physical Education 129, 130; 229, 230; 329, 330; 429, 430- American 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 
Folk and Square Dance. 

Physical Education 131, 132- Officiating. 

Two double periods a week. One credit. Miss Woosley. 

Physical Education 133, 134; 233, 234; 333, 334; 433, 434-Tennis. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 

Physical Education 135, 136; 235, 236; 335, 336; 435, 436- Golf 
Two double periods a week. One credit. Staff. 



Physical Education 137, 138; 237, 238; 337, 338; 437, 438- Bowling. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 



Physical Education 139, 140; 239, 240; 339, 340; 439, 440-Archery. 
Two double periods a week. One credit. Staff. 

Physical Education 141, 142; 241, 242; 341, 342; 441, 442- Fencing. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Miss Henderson, Miss Hyde. 

Physical Education 143, 144; 243, 244; 343, 344; 443, 444-Track and 
Field. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 

Physical Education 145, 146; 245, 246; 345, 346; 445,446- Badminton. 
Three periods a week. One credit. Staff. 



138 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



*Physical Education 147, 148; 247, 248; 347, 348; 447, 44%-Riding. 

Two double periods a week. One credit. Mr. Kirschner. 

♦Written permission of parent or guardian must be presented 
before enrollment in this course may be completed. Each student 
will have an opportunity to ride in the annual Horse Show. 

Riding for recreation, without credit, two hours a week each 
semester. Fee, $75.00. 




Dance 

The major program in dance requires a minimum of twenty- 
four credits selected from courses in dance and twelve credits in 
the related fields of art, drama, and music. The student will 
select one of these areas to satisfy the fine arts requirement. 
A major student must acquire the ability to perform well in dance. 
The four-year program should be planned in consultation with the 
adviser. 
The twenty- four credits within the major are as follows: 

Studio Dance 6 

Dance 211-212 Analysis of Movement Theories 6 

Dance 232 Survey of Dance Styles 2 

Dance 351, 352 History of Dance 6 

Dance 431-432 Problems in Choreography 4 

The twelve credits in related fields may be selected from the 
Following: 

Art 6 

Any advanced course in Art History 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 6 

Dramatic Arts 321, 322 Acting 

Dramatic Arts 361 , 362 History of Theatre ]^_ 

Dramatic Arts 41 1 , 412 Stagecraft and Design CCW TR ^F 

Dramatic Arts 431, 432 Directing 

Music 6 OFFERINGS 

Music 285, 286 Instrumental Sight 

Reading (no credit) 
Music 305, 306 History of Music 
Music 315 Twentieth Century Music 
The twenty-eight credits of electives should be selected in con- 
sultation with the adviser. Electives include additional dance courses 
and courses of the student's choice. 

*Dance 121, 122; 221, 222; 321, 322; 421, All-Ballet. 

The study of ballet as a discipline toward exactness and precision of line, 
as a creative means of expression, and from an historical reference. Three 
periods a week. One credit each semester. Miss Darby, Miss Dragomanovic, 
Mrs. Gardner. 



*Dance 123, 124; 223, 224; 323, 324; 423, 414-Modern Dance. 

The study of body movement, its relationship to space, time, and force, 
through improvisation and exploration. Three periods a week. One credit 
each semester. Miss Darby, Mrs. Gardner, Mrs. Read. 



♦Studio Dance 



Dance 211-212— Analysis of Movement Theories. 

The comparison of selected theories of movement, including Dalcroze 
(rhythm); Delsarte (gesture); Graham (energy); Humphrey-Weidman (gravity); 
Laban (effort-shape); Metheny-Ellfeldt (kinesthesis); Wigman (space); and the 
contemporary concept of total body movement (applied anatomy). Three 
periods a week. Six credits. Mrs. Read. 

*Dance 231 — Studies in Compositional Forms. 

The study of forms in dance as the structure and organization of movement 
patterns and phrases. Experimental studies. Two double periods a week. 
One credit. Miss Darby, Mrs. Gardner, Mrs. Read. 

Dance 232- Survey of Dance Styles. 

The study of dance style related to historical periods in art, drama, and 
music. Creative work in primitive, archaic, medieval, pre-classic, classic, 
and contemporary styles. Three double periods a week. Two credits. Miss 
Darby, Mrs. Gardner, Mrs. Read. 



140 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Dance 235-236— Dance Movement for the Theatre. 

Prerequisite: two credits of modern dance or proficiency. A study of move- 
ment as an instrument of communication in dramatic production through 
creative projects in the theatre involving the interrelation of movement with 
mime, gesture, space, rhythm, and expression. Two double periods a week. 
Two credits. Miss Dragomanovic, Mrs. Read. 

Dance 310- Creative Dance for Children. 

Dramatic imagery, rhythmic improvisation, and the translation from ob- 
servation of movement through pantomine to dance. Two double periods a 
week. Two credits. Miss Darby. 



*Dance 331— Ethnic Dance of Western Cultures. 

The study of the authentic and traditional dance forms and styles of the 
people of Western Cultures through knowledge and understanding of their 
history, culture and civilization. Performance of selected dances. Three 
periods a week. Two credits. Miss Darby, Mrs. Read. 

Dance 332— Ethnic Dance of Eastern Cultures. 

The study of the dance forms and styles of the people of Eastern Cultures 
through knowledge and understanding of their history, culture and civilization. 
Three periods a week. Two credits. Miss Darby. 

Dance 340— Labanotation. 

The study and practice of reading and recording movement by means of 
symbols. Three double periods a week. Two credits. Mrs. Gardner. 



*Studio Dance. 



Dance 351, 352- History of Dance. 

The study of the evolution of dance from its beginnings to the present time, 
as it reflects the culture and history of the period. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. Mrs. Read. 

Dance 431- 432- Problems in Choreography. 

Prerequisite: Dance 231, 232 or permission of the instructor. Opportunities 
for reading and research related to the portrayal of an idea, mood, char- 
acterization, or an emotion through dance in a theatrical setting as a non- 
verbal form of the communicative arts. Three double periods a week. Four 
credits. Miss Darby, Mrs. Gardner, Mrs. Read. 

Dance 440— Independent Study. 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Research, reading, writing, 
choreographing or composing an approved creative problem in dance. Develop- 
ment of a paper, project, performance or production. Three credits. Staff. 



HISTORY/ Professor Joseph C. Vance, Chairman; Professor 
Lindsey; Associate Professors M. Houston, Zimdars; Assistant 
Professors Bourdon, Klenke, Ryang, Saunders, Sherwood, 
Warner; Instructors Campbell, Tracy. 



141 



Students who choose a major program in history must earn 

thirty-six credits in history and related subjects, in addition to six COURSE 

credits in American History. Twenty-four of these credits are to 

be taken in history, and must include the following courses: UrrbKlJNLro 

History 111-1 12— History of Civilization 

History 211-212— Modern and Contemporary European History 

History 362— Methods of Historical Research 

It is recommended that students majoring in history take His- 
tory 111-112 before taking History 101-102. 

The remaining twelve required hours must consist of six hours 
each in two related fields. Selection of these fields must be made 
in consultation with the student's adviser in history. 

History 101-102— American History. 

A survey of the history of the United States from the colonial period to 
the present. Six credits. Staff. 

History 111-1 12 -History of Western Civilization. 

An introductory survey of the origin and development of civilization- 
ancient, medieval and modern. Six credits. Staff. 

History 211-212- Modern European History. 

A survey of European history from the French Revolution to the present, 
with emphasis on the Industrial Revolution, nationalism, democracy, imperia- 
lism, power politics and social reform. Six credits. Mr. Lindsey. 



History 221-222- Medieval History. 

A study of the history of Europe from 325 to 1400. Emphasis on the 
decline of the Roman Empire, migrations, the church, feudal institutions, 
medieval thought and the origins of modern national institutions. Six credits. 
(Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Klenke. 

History 223— The Renaissance and the Reformation. 

A study of the age of the Renaissance as one which bridges the gap 
between the High Middle Ages and modern times, with particular attention 
to the problems which the period poses as an age of transition. Three credits. 
(Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Klenke. 

History 301, 302-English History. 

A general survey of English history from earliest records to the present. 
Emphasis upon the economic and constitutional phases and growth of the 
British Empire. Three credits each semester. Mr. Lindsey. 

History 311— Civil War and Reconstruction. 

Prerequisite: History 101-102. Background of the sectional conflict with 
emphasis on the slavery controversy; immediate causes of secession; the Civil 
War militarily and politically. Reconstruction 1865-1877. Three credits. (Offered 
in alternate years. Not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Saunders. 



142 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



History 312— The Negro as a Factor in American History. 

Prerequisite: History 101-102. A history of the Negro since the early 
1600's with emphasis on his role during the Ante-Bellum period; Emancipa- 
tion and Reconstruction; the nadir of the Negro in America (1878-1900); 
the Negro in the twentieth century with stress on the period since 1928. 
Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. 
Saunders. 



History 321, 322— Colonial America. 

A general survey of the colonial period of American history. Three credits 
each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. 
Bourdon. 



History 331— Greek Civilization. 

A study of the geography, history and civilization of Greece from earliest 
times through the death of Alexander the Great. Three credits. Mr. Sherwood. 



History 332— Roman Civilizat, 

'— of the geography, history and civilization ot Italy and the K 
earliest times through the age of Justinian. Three credits. 



uisiiMj jji — iKurnun K^ivin^ution. 

A study of the geography, history and civilization of Italy and the Roman 

State from <»J»rlip«t tim*»s thrnnoh thp P n " ~ f T.io+J«;«« Tkroo nraA\*o \Ar 



Mr. 



Sherwood 



History 335, 336— Diplomatic History of the United States. 

Prerequisite: History 101-102. A study of diplomatic activities and foreign 
relations from colonial times to the present. Three credits each semester. 
Mr. Campbell. 



History 341, 342— Social and Intellectual History of the United States. 

Prerequisite: History 101-102. The course traces the main traditions of 
thought and belief through the writings of significant figures in relation to 
the social environment and the significant historical events and cultural changes. 
Three credits each semester. Mr. Tracy. 

History 355— The Frontier in American History. 

Prerequisite: History 101-102. A study of the Westward movement and the 
significance of the frontier. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered 
in 1969-70.) Mr. Houston. 

History 356— Recent America. 

Prerequisite: History 101-102. An attempt to study in depth the history of 
the United States from 1920 to the present. Three credits. Mr. Vance. 

History 357, 358— Latin American History. 

Colonial institutions, the independence movement, development of the 
modern states, organization of American States, and other international 
problems. Three credits each semester. Mr. Zimdars. 



History 361— Historiography . 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the major historians, 
historical writings and trends in the discipline of history and some of the 
general philosophical theories of history. Three credits. History majors are 
urged to take this course. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1969- 
70.) Mr. Bourdon. 

History 362— Methods in Historical Research. 

A proseminar designed to provide an acquaintance through practice with 
the methods and techniques of, and resources for, historical research and 
writing. One of its primary objectives is to enable the student to use libraries 
with facility and pleasure. Three credits. Required of all history majors. 
Offered both semesters. Mr. Vance. 



143 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



History 365— American Historical Biography. 

Prerequisite: History 101-102. An examination of representative Americans, 
1776 to 1865, emphasizing their contributions to the development of the 
country and their biographies. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. 
Offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Saunders. 

History 366— American Historical Biography. 

Prerequisite: History 365 or the permission of the instructor. An examina- 
tion of representative Americans, 1865 to the present, emphasizing their con- 
tribution to the development of the country and their biographies. Three 
credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Saunders. 



History 371, 372— East Asian Civilization. 

A survey of the development of culture and civilizations in China and 
Japan. Three credits each semester. Mr. Ryang. 



History 375— History of Modern China and Japan. 

A history of modern China and Japan with a special emphasis on their 
rise to positions of world power.' Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. 
Not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Ryang. 

History 316— Modern Southeast Asia. 

A history of modern Southeast Asia. Three credits. (Offered in alternate 
years. Not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Ryang. 

History 381 — History of Russia. 

Peter the Great to the 1905 Revolution: Russia's emergence as a European 
and later an Asiatic power; her role in world politics; the increase of her 
territory; political, economic, and social development and dissent. Three credits. 
Mr. Warner. 

History 382— History of Russia. 

Russia in the 20th Century; early revolution and repression, the first 
World War, the revolutions of 1917, Russia under Communism, Russia as 
a world power during and since World War II. Three credits. Mr. Warner. 



144 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



History 391, 392— European Social and Intellectual History. 

Selected studies of representative thinkers from St. Augustine to the 
present, emphasizing their place in the development of Western thought. 
Three credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1969- 
70.) Mr. Klenke. 

History 411 — The Age of Jefferson. 

Prerequisite: History 101-102. An examination of the era from 1760- 
1826. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1969-70.) Mr. 
Bourdon. 



History 412— The Age of Jackson. 

Prerequisite: History 101-102. An examination of the Jacksonian Era with 
emphasis upon the rise of the "Common Man," reform movements, the 
influence of the West, and the growth of sectionalism. Three credits. (Offered 
in alternate years. Offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Bourdon. 

History 451-452— Social and Intellectual History of Latin America. 

An intensive study of institutions and thought from preconquest Indian 
cultures to the present. Six credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 
1969-70.) Mr. Zimdars. 



History 461- The Old Regime. 

The emergence of the ideas and institutions of Seventeenth Century France, 
from the Renaissance through the monarchy of Louis XIV, with their sub- 
sequent modification in the Eighteenth Century. Three credits. (Offered in 
alternate years. Offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Warner. 



History 462— The French Revolution and Napoleon. 

Prerequisite: History 461 or the permission of the instructor. An examina- 
tion of the factual structure of the Revolution and the varying interpreta- 
tions of it from Burke to Lefevbre. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. 
Offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Warner. 



HOME ECONOMICS/ Professor Guenndolyn A. Beeler, Chair- 
man; Assistant Professors R. Harris, Jamison. 



The Department of Home Economics offers as electives all 
courses for students in any curriculum. Credit may not be included 
in the total hours required for graduation if the student is ful- 
filling certification requirements, since a total of only twelve (12) 
credit hours is allowed in both Home Economics and Education. 
The Home Economics Department is concerned with implementing 
the liberal arts program through courses which help prepare stu- 
dents to meet basic and human needs for effective living and for 
responsible participation in the community and the world. 



Home Economics 104— International Foods. 

A study of food patterns of various cultural groups and the way they meet 
the dietary needs of the people. Emphasis on the interrelationships of the 
contributions of Asian, European, African, Central and Latin American 
civilizations. Demonstrations of the preparation of typical meals of different 
cultures. Two single periods a week. Two credits. (Not offered in 1969-70.) 
Mrs. Harris. 



145 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Home Economics 112— Art of Costume. 

Consideration given to the theories of dress and adornment with implica- 
tions for individual application. Two credits. Two lectures. Either semester. 
Mrs. Jamison. 

Home Economics 113— Family Health. 

Guidance in meeting family problems related to maintenance of health and 
care during illness. Review of recent research in family health problems. 
Two credits either semester. Two lectures, Miss Beeler. 



Home Economics 211— Contemporary Costume. 

Consideration given to Twentieth Century clothing in relation to factors 
influencing the production and consumption of wearing apparel for the satis- 
faction of human wants. A basic course for the beginning student in clothing 
construction. Three credits. Five lecture and laboratory hours. Either semester. 
Mrs. Jamison. 



Home Economics 212— Contemporary Costume. 

A study of the factors influencing apparel design and the various methods 
used in custom dressmaking and tailoring. A course designed for the student 
who has a background in clothing construction. Three credits. Five lecture 
and laboratory hours. Second semester. (Offered alternate years.) Mrs. 
Jamison. 



Home Economics 214— Costume Design. 

A creative approach to the study of dress and adornment. Original designs 
developed and creativity expressed through the medias of pattern-making 
and draping. Three credits. Five Lecture and Laboratory hours Second 
Semester. (Offered alternate years.) Mrs. Jamison. 

Home Economics 221, 222 + — Foods. 

Basic principles and fundamental processes involved in the selection and 
preparation of foods; emphasis on the aesthetic and sociological aspects of 
menu planning. Two double periods a week. Three credits each semester. 
Mrs. Harris. 



146 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Home Economics 231— Nutrition. 

Principles of human nutrition and how such knowledge may be utilized 
to prevent ill health and promote a high level of physical fitness. Two single 
and one double periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mrs. Harris. 

Home Economics 233— Consumer Economics. 

Problems involved in the selection and purchase of goods and services 
required by individuals and families. Sources of information; governmental 
and other agencies serving the consumer; social responsibilities of consumers. 
Three credits. Miss Beeler. 



Home Economics 234— Home Decoration. 

Application of design and art principles to the planning, decorating, furnish- 
ing, landscaping and financing of a home. Traditional and contemporary 
styles are studied. Three credits. Miss Beeler. 

Home Economics 237— Modern Marriage. 

Concepts of the development of modern family life. The expanding, con- 
tracting, and interaction dynamics of families in changing times. Three 
credits. Miss Beeler. 



Home Economics 238— Family Relations. 

Marriage and the family in our social order; factors contributing to marital 
success or failure; relationships between parents and children, brothers and 
sisters, and the various stages of the family life cycle from birth to old age. 
Three credits. Miss Beeler. 



LIBERAL ARTS SEMINAR 

The Liberal Arts Seminars offer an opportunity for participa- 
tion in a planned program of reading, discussion, and assigned 
papers. Each seminar is directed by two members of the faculty, 
who share the responsibility for planning, conducting and evaluating 
the work done. A student who withdraws from the seminar at 
the end of the first semester may, upon the recommendation of 
the directors, receive credit for three semester hours. Enrollment 
is by permission of the instructors and is limited to eighteen 
students in each seminar. 

Liberal Arts Seminar I- II (For freshmen). 
Two one and one-half periods a week. Six credits. 

Liberal Art Seminar HI- IV (For sophomores , juniors and seniors). 
Two one and one-half periods a week. Six credits. 



MATHEMATICS/ Professor Hobart C. Carter, Chairman; Pro- 
fessor Shaw; Associate Professor A. M. Harris; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Jones, Pierce, Sarchet, Turner, Zeleznock*; Instructors 
Gardner, Kemmler, Tyree. 

Students who undertake a major program in mathematics are 
required to earn thirty-six credits in mathematics and related sub- 
jects. 

Twenty-four must be selected from courses in mathematics more 
advanced than Mathematics 111-112, Mathematical Analysis, and at 
least twelve must be earned in the following fields: 

Mathematics— Any 300 or 400 course undertaken in addition to 
the twenty-four credit requirement. 

Physics— Any course in physics. 

Astronomy— Any course in astronomy. 

Philosophy— Philosophy 221 , 344. 

Psychology— Psychology 371, 372. 

Chemistry-Chemistry 393, 394. 

Economics— Economics 372. 

Freshmen who enter with four or more units of mathematics 
should consult the chairman of the department for placement. 



147 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



'On leave 1968-69 



Mathematics 111- 112— Mathematical Analysis. 

This course includes topics from set theory, logic, mathematical founda- 
tions, college algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and an introduction to 
calculus. Three periods a week. Six credits. Staff. 

Mathematics 211- 212— Calculus. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111-112. Differential and integral calculus. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. Staff. 

Mathematics 301, 302— Higher Algebra. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Number theory, groups, fields, matrices, 
rings, ideals. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Miss Gardner, 
Mrs. Pierce. 

Mathematics 312— Differential Equations. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Ordinary differential equations with ap- 
plications and an introduction to partial differential equations. Three periods 
a week. Three credits. Mr. Shaw. 



Mathematics 341, 342— Advanced Calculus. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Three periods a week. Three credits 
each semester. Staff. 



148 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Mathematics 411 — Vectors and Matrices. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 341. The algebra and calculus of vectors and 



an introduction to 
credits. Mr. Shaw. 



the theory of matrices. Three periods a week. Three 



Mathematics 431, 432- Higher Geometry. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Basic ideas and methods of higher 
geometry; the geometries associated with the projective group of transforma- 
tion; applications to affine and metric geometries. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. Mr. Carter. 

Mathematics 435, 436- Selected Topics in Mathematics. 

A program of independent study under the direction of a member of the 
staff. Open to senior majors with the permission of the department. Three 
credits each semester. Staff. 



Mathematics 441 — General Topology. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 301. Point-set theory; simplexes and complexes; 
topological invariance; introduction to homology and homotopy theory. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Sarchet. 



Mathematics 446— Probability. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Definitions of probability, combinatorial 
analysis, combination of events, conditional probability, common distributions, 
random variables, and recurrent events. Three periods a week. Three credits. 
Mr. Shaw. 

Mathematics 451, 452— Numerical and Graphical Analysis. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Numerical and graphical methods applied 
to the following: solution of equations; interpolation; differentiation; integra- 
tion; and solution of differential equations. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. Mr. Carter. 



MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES/ Professor Mary Ellen 
Stephenson, Chairman; Professors Rolling, Greene, Hoge,H. 
Luntz, McIntosh, Rivera; Associate Professors Blessing, 
Bozicevic, Hofmann, Perez; Assistant Professors Antony, 

MANOLIS, NAKOi; 7ftS/rWCtorsCAPELLE,CHETAI,DAGNINO,LoONEY, 

Schneller, Sendra; Assistant Instructors L. Mann, Robbins. 



Major programs are offered in French, German, and Spanish. 

Course sequences in Italian and Russian are also available. 
Two years of Portuguese are offered for related studies if there is 
sufficient demand. 

Students applying for admission to the College must take a 
College Board Achievement Test in a foreign language. If this 
test is taken in a modern foreign language, students planning to 
continue in that language will be advised of the level of the course 
in which they should enroll. 

A student who has high school credit for two or three units in 
a foreign language will not receive credit for a beginning course 
in that language. 

A student who has high school credit for four years in a foreign 
language will not receive credit for an intermediate course in that 
language. 

Students who read, write, and speak a language other than 
English may receive credit only for advanced courses in that 
language. 

The foreign language is the language of the classroom for all 
courses numbered 200 and above. Other levels will use the foreign 
language as much as student preparation and progress allow. 

To insure majors an acquaintance with all acknowledged master- 
pieces of the literature, the department offers a guided reading 
program. 



149 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Each student in elementary and intermediate classes in Modern 
Foreign Languages will spend a minimum of one and one half 
hours a week in the Language Laboratory as a part of her pre- 
paration beyond and above scheduled class sessions. 



150 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



French 

Students who undertake a major program in French must take 
thirty-six credits in French and related subjects. These credits 
are to be distributed in the following manner: 

1. Twenty-four credits in French, chosen from courses numbered 
300 or higher and including French 305-306 and French 407-408. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits selected from the following: 
Two courses in the 100 group from another foreign lan- 
guage 12 credits 

A course in the 200 group from another foreign 

language 6 credits 

A course in the 300 or the 400 group from another 

foreign language 6 credits 

A course in the 300 group of English literature ... 6 credits 
Art 312, 313, Medieval Art, Art 315, 316, Seventeenth and 
Eighteenth Century Art, or Art 451, 452, Nineteenth and 

Twentieth Century Art 6 credits 

History 211-212, Modern European, or History 461, 462, 
The Old Regime and The French Revolution and 

Napoleon 6 credits 

Philosophy 322, Medieval Philosophy and Philosophy 
401, Philosophy Since the Renaissance 6 credits 



French majors in the junior and senior year are required to 
read and to report in the language of their major on ten books 
each year. Some of these studies may be incorporated in the work 
of the Senior Seminar. 

Each French major should reside for one session in the French 
House. 

French 101-102- Beginning French. 

For students who enter college with fewer than two units in high school 
French. Five periods a week, two of which will be laboratory periods. Six 
credits. Staff. 



French 103- 104— Intermediate French. 

Prerequisite: French 101-102 or two to three units in high school French. 
Grammar review; varied reading; oral work with emphasis on the language 
laboratory. Three periods a week. Six credits. Staff. 



French 107-108— Fundamentals of French Pronunciation and 

Conversation. 

Prerequisite: French 101-102 or two units of high school French. A basic 
or remedial course for serious students who lack the proficiency in French 
which would make them eligible for French 203-204. Does not provide credit 
toward the major in French or the language requirements. Two periods a 
week. One credit each semester. Staff. 

French 201-202— Introduction to French Literature. 

Prerequisite: French 103-104 or four units of high school French. Selected 
readings from all periods of French literature. Three periods a week. Six 
credits. Staff. 

French 203- 204— French Conversation. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or proof of proficiency at this level. 
A course offered especially for majors or those planning to live in the French 
House, but open to others with permission of the instructor. Two periods 
a week. Two credits. Mrs. Mann. 



French 205- 206— Survey of French Literature. 

Open only to French majors and to certain other students who have 
demonstrated unusual ability in the language. Prerequisite: French 103-104 
or four units of high school French. Lectures, reports, and selections from 
representative writers. Three periods a week. Six credits. Staff. 

French 209— French Civilization. 

Prerequisite: French 103-104 or four units of high school French. Geo- 
graphy, history, and the political and cultural background of France and the 
French people. THIS COURSE MAY NOT BE SELECTED TO SATISFY 
THE LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. Three periods a week. Three credits. 
Mrs. Blessing. 



151 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



French 212— Studies in Language I. 

Grammar and composition. Recommended for majors. Open to students 
who have completed 4 years of high school French or French 103-104. 
Three periods a week. One semester. Three credits. THIS COURSE MAY 
NOT BE SELECTED TO SATISFY THE LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. 
(Offered each spring semester.) Mrs. Blessing. 

THE PREREQUISITE FOR 300 AND 400 LEVEL COURSES IS SATIS- 
FACTORY COMPLETION OF FRENCH 205-206, OR PERMISSION OF 
THE INSTRUCTOR. 

French 301 — Literature of the Middle Ages. 

Three hours a week. Three credits. (Offered in 1968-69.) Mrs. Hofmann. 

French 302— Literature of the Sixteenth Century. 

Three hours a week. Three credits. (Offered in 1968-69.) Mrs. Hofmann. 



French 303— Drama of the Seventeenth Century. 

Three hours a week. Three credits. (Offered in 1968-69.) Mrs. Luntz. 



French 304— Non-dramatic Literature of the Seventeenth Century. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. (Offered in 1968-69.) Mrs. Luntz. 

French 305-306— Studies in Language II. 

Advanced grammar and composition. Translation. Required of majors. 
Others by permission of the instructor. Three periods a week. Two semesters. 
Six credits. 

French 307- The Novel of the Nineteenth Century. 

Three periods a week. Three credits. (Not offered in 1968-69.) Mr. Jones. 

French 308— The Novel of the Twentieth Century. 

Three periods a week. Three credits. (Offered in 1968-69.) Mrs. Hoge. 



152 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



French 401— Twentieth Century Theatre. 

Three hours a week. (Offered in 1968-69.) Mrs. Hoge. 

French 402— Twentieth Century Poetry. 

Three hours a week. Three credits. (Not offered in 1968-69.) Mrs. Hoge. 

French 403— The Literature of Eighteenth Century Philosophers. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. (Offered in 1968-69.) Miss Greene. 

French 404— The Theatre and the Novel of the Eighteenth Century. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. (Offered in 1968-69.) Miss Greene. 

French 407-408— French Conversation. 

Required of majors unless excused after examination by the department. 
Two periods a week. Two credits. Mrs. Mann. 

French 409— Nineteenth Century Romanticism in the Theatre and in 
Poetry. 

Three hours a week. Three credits. (Not offered in 1968-69.) Mrs. Boiling, 
Mr. Jones. 

French 410— Nineteenth Century Post-Romantic Theatre and Poetry 
(The Parnasse and Symbolism). 
Three hours a week. Three credits. Mrs. Boiling, Mr. Jones. 

French 411, 412 +— Senior Seminar in French. 

Open to seniors with permission of department. Three hours a week. 
Three credits each semester. Staff. 



French 491 — Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three 
credits a semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the 
department.) 



German 

Students who choose a major program in German must take 
thirty-six credits in German and related subjects. These credits 
are to be distributed in the following manner: 

1 , Twenty-four credits in German chosen from courses numbered 
300 or higher, including German 357-358. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits selected from the following: 
Two courses in the 100 group from another foreign lan- 
guage 12 credits 

A course in the 200 group from another 

foreign language 6 credits 

A course in the 300 or 400 group from another 

foreign language 6 credits 

English 425 , 426 , Shakespeare 6 credits 

History 221-222, Medieval History 6 credits 

History 391 , 392, European Social and 

Intellectual History 6 credits 

German majors must complete during their junior and senior 
years readings outlined by their advisers to cover periods of litera- 
ture never covered in class. 

German 151-152— Beginning German. 

For students offering fewer than two units in high school German. Funda- 
mentals of grammar, composition, conversation, and reading. Five periods a 
week, two of which are laboratory periods. Six credits. Staff. 



153 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



German 153- 154— Intermediate German. 

Prerequisite: German 151-152 or two to three units of high school Ger- 
man. Grammar review and conversation; reading of modern German texts. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. Staff. 

German 155- 156— German Conversation. 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or proof of proficiency at this level. Two 
periods a week. Two credits. Staff. 

German 251-252— Introduction to German Literature and Civilization. 

Prerequisite: German 153-154 or four units of high school German. A 
study through selected texts of the literary and cultural background of the 
German people. Three periods a week. Six credits. Staff. 



THE PREREQUISITE FOR 300 AND 400 LEVEL COURSES IS SATIS- 
FACTORY COMPLETION OF GERMAN 251-252, OR PERMISSION 
OF THE INSTRUCTOR. 



German 351-352— Advanced Grammar and Composition. 

Required of majors. Three periods a week. Six credits. (Offered in 1968-69.) 



Staff. 



German 355, 356+— German Literature from the Earliest Times 
Through the Eighteenth Century. 

Emphasis on the epic of the Middle Ages, the literature of the Baroque 
Period and the Age of Enlightenment. Three periods a week. Three credits 
each semester. (Offered in 1968-69.) Mr. Antony. 

German 357, 358+— German Classicism and Romanticism. 

Fall semester: literature of the classic movement; spring semester: literature 
of the romantic schools. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 
(Not offered in 1968-69.) Mr. Nakoi. 

German 451, 452— Nineteenth Century Literature. 
Lectures, readings, and reports. Three periods a week. Three credits each 
semester. (Offered in 1968-69.) Mr. Antony. 



154 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



German 453- 454— Advanced German Conversation. 
Required of majors unless excused after examination by the department, 
periods a week. Two credits. Staff. 



Two 



German 455, 456+— Modern German Literature. 

A study of representative works from 1890 to the present. Three periods 
a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in 1968-69.) Mr. Nakoi. 

German 457, 458— Goethe's "Faust." 

A thorough study and interpretation of this great masterpiece and its 
background. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in 
alternate years; not offered in 1968-69.) Mr. Antony. 

German 459, 460+- Readings in German. 

Open to seniors by permission of the department. One period a week. One 
credit each semester. Staff. 

German 461, 462 + - Goethe's Faust in Translation. 
Taught in English. Not accepted as Foreign Language requirement toward 
degree. Two hours a week. Two credits each semester. Miss Schneller. 



German 491 — Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three 
credits a semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the 
department.) 




Italian 

Italian 161-162— Beginning Italian. 

For students who enter college with fewer than two units of high school 
Italian. Fundamentals of grammar and pronunciation; reading and conversa- 
tion. Five periods a week, two in the laboratory. Six credits. Staff. 

Italian 163- 164- Intermediate Italian. 

Prerequisite: Italian 161-162 or two units of high school Italian. A review 
of grammatical principles; readings of selected texts, collateral reading. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. Staff. 



Italian 165- 166— Italian Conversation. 

Prerequisite: Italian 161-162 or two years of high school Italian. Two 
periods a week. Two credits. Miss Dagnino. 

Italian 261- 262— Introduction to Italian Literature and Civilization. 

Prerequisite: Italian 163-164 or four units of high school Italian. A study 
based on Italian texts of the literary and cultural history of Italian people. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. Miss Dagnino. 



155 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Italian 263, 264+— Dante in Translation. 

A study of Dante's Divine Comedy together with background material 
both literary and historical of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. This 
course will be given in English. Not accepted as part of the foreign language 
requirement for a degree. Two periods a week. Two credits each semester. 
Miss Dagnino. 

Italian 361, 362 + —Nineteenth Century Literature. 

Readings from Italian literature with emphasis on the novel and drama 
of the nineteenth century. Three periods a week. Two credits each semester. 
(Not offered in 1968-69.) Miss Dagnino. 

Italian 461, 462 +- Dante. 

A study of Dante's Divine Comedy and the early Italian poets. Three 
periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Not offered in 1968-69.) 



Italian 491— Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three credits 
a semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the depart- 
ment.) 



Portuguese 

Portuguese 141- 142— Beginning Portuguese. 

For students who enter college with fewer than two units in high school 
Portuguese. Grammar and readings; conversation based on the Brazilian 
pronunciation. Five periods a week, two in the laboratory. Six credits. 
Miss Herman. 

Portuguese 143-144— Intermediate Portuguese. 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 141-142 or two to three units in high school 
Portuguese. A brief review of grammar; reading and discussion of modern 
Brazilian literature, conversation. Three periods a week. Six credits. Miss 
Herman. 

Portuguese 491— Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three 
credits a semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the 
department.) 

Russian 



156 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Russian 171- 172— Beginning Russian. 

For students who enter college with fewer than two units in Russian. 
The basic vocabulary and fundamental grammatical structure of the language; 
practice in conversation and reading of easy Russian texts. Five periods a 
week, two of them in the laboratory. Six credits. Mr. Bozicevic. 



Russian 173- 174— Intermediate Russian. 

Prerequisite: Russian 171-172 or equivalent. Thorough review of grammar; 
reading of selected texts from modern prose writers; conversation on topics 
of current interest. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Bozicevic. 

Russian 271-272— Introduction to Russian Literature and Civilization. 

Prerequisite: Russian 173-174 or equivalent. Readings and discussion of 
representative works with emphasis on nineteenth and twentieth century 
literary masters and their times. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mr. 
Bozicevic. 

Russian 273-274— Russian Conversation. 

Prerequisite: Russian 171-172 or equivalent. Two periods a week. Two 
credits. Mr. Bozicevic. (On sufficient demand only) 



Russian 371-372— Soviet Russian Literature. 

Prerequisite: Russian 173-174 or equivalent. Reading and analysis of repre- 
sentative works by Soviet Russian writers such as Gor'kii, Sholokhov, 
Maiakosvkii, Leonov, Fadeev, Pasternak, and others. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. Mr. Bozicevic. 



Russian 491 — Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three 
credits a semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the 
department.) 



Spanish 

Students who choose a major program in Spanish must take 
thirty-six credits in Spanish and related subjects. These credits are 
to be distributed in the following manner. 

1. Twenty- four credits in Spanish, chosen from courses num- 
bered 300 or higher and including a six-hour course in 
Spanish-American Literature. Spanish 327-328 and Spanish 
423-424 are also required unless the student is excused after 
an examination by the department. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits selected from the following: 
Two courses in the 100 group from another 

foreign language 12 credits 

A course in the 200 group from another foreign 

language 6 credits 

A course in the 300 or 400 group from another 

foreign language 6 credits 

History 141-142, Latin American History 6 credits 

English 335, 336, Nineteenth Century English or 

English 365, 366, Modern English Literature 6 credits 

Philosophy 322, Medieval Philosophy, and Philosophy 

401, Philosophy Since the Renaissance 6 credits 

Courses in Geography or Political Science 

of Latin American content 6 or 

more credits 
Spanish majors must complete during their junior and senior 
years readings outlined by their advisers to cover periods of litera- 
ture never studied in class. Each Spanish major should live in the 
Spanish House during at least one year of her college course. 



157 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Spanish 121-122— Beginning Spanish. 

For students who enter College with fewer than two units of High School 
Spanish. Five hours a week, two of them in the laboratory. Six credits. 
Staff. 



Spanish 123- 124— Intermediate Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 121-122 or two or three units of high school Spanish. 
Conversation and composition; varied readings; review of grammatical 
principles; practice in the language laboratory. Three periods a week. Six 
credits. Staff. 



Spanish 214— Studies in Language I. 

Grammar and composition. Recommended for majors. Open to students 
who have completed four years of high school Spanish or Spanish 123-124. 
Three periods a week. One semester. Three credits. THIS COURSE MAY 
NOT BE SELECTED TO SATISFY THE LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. 
Miss Rivera. 

Prerequisites for 200-level courses are satisfactory completion of Spanish 
123-124 and/or proof of proficiency at this level. 

Spanish 219-220— Introduction to Spanish- American Literature. 
Selected readings from the works of great writers of various periods. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. Staff. 

Spanish 221-222— Introduction to Spanish Literature. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 123-124 or four units of high school Spanish. Readings 
from the works of the great writers of various periods. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. Staff. 

Spanish 225-226— Spanish Conversation. 

A course offered especially for majors or those living in the Spanish 
House, but open to others with the permission of the instructor. Two 
periods a week. Two credits. Staff. 



158 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Spanish 227, 228 + — Spanish and Spanish American Civilization. 

A survey of Spanish and Spanish American History and institutions, with 
attention devoted to their ethnic, political, and artistic aspects. THIS COURSE 
MAY NOT BE SELECTED TO SATISFY THE LANGUAGE REQUIRE- 
MENT. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Staff. 



Spanish 231— The Novelas Ejemp lares and Entremeses of Cervantes. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 

Spanish 232— The Drama of the Golden Age. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 

Spanish 233— Drama of Spain after 1850. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 

Spanish 234— Spanish Fiction of the Nineteenth Century. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 

Spanish 235— Poetry of Spain. 

Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 

Spanish 236- The Generation of 1898 in Spain. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 



Spanish 231— The Poetry of Spanish America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 



Spanish 238— The Literature of Mexico and Central America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 

Spanish 239- The Fiction of Spanish America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 

Spanish 240— The Essay of Spanish America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Staff. 

THE PREREQUISITE FOR 300 AND 400 LEVEL COURSES IS THE 
SATISFACTORY COMPLETION OF SIX HOURS OF 200 LEVEL LITERA- 
TURE CLASSES AND/OR PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR. 

Spanish 321, 322+— Literature of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, 

and Eighteenth Century. 

Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Not offered in 1968-69.) 
Miss Stephenson. 

Spanish 325— Nineteenth Century Romanticism. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Miss Rivera. 



Spanish 326— Post-Romantic Drama and Poetry. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Miss Rivera. 

Spanish 327-328- Studies in Language II. 

Advanced composition and grammar. Required of majors. Three periods 
a week. Six credits. Miss Rivera. 



159 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Spanish 329— Spanish American Literature of the Period of the 
Conquest. 

Three periods a week. Three credits. (Not offered in 1968-69.) Mr. Perez. 

Spanish 330— Spanish American Literature of the XVII and XVIII 

Centuries. 

Three periods a week. Three credits. (Not offered in 1968-69.) Mr. Perez. 

Spanish 331, 332- The Novel of the XIX Century. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in 1968-69.) 
Miss Rivera. 



Spanish 42\-The Drama of the XX Century. 

Three periods a week. Three credits. (Offered in 1968-69.) Miss Stephenson. 



Spanish 422- Poetry of the XX Century. 

Three periods a week. Three credits. (Offered in 1968-69.) Miss Stephenson. 



Spanish 423, 424+- Twentieth Century Prose. 

Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in 1968-69.) 
Miss Stephenson. 

Spanish 425, 426 + - Drama and Poetry of the Golden Age in Spain. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in 1968-69.) 
Mr. Mcintosh. 

Spanish 427, 428+- The Novel of the Golden Age in Spain. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Not offered in 1968-69.) 
Mr. Mcintosh. 

Spanish 429, 430+— Nineteenth Century Literature in Spanish America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in 1968-69.) 
Mr. Perez. 

Spanish 431, 432+— Twentieth Century Literature of Spanish America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. (Offered in 1968-69.) Mr. Perez. 



160 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Spanish 435, 436 —Readings in Spanish. 

Open to seniors with permission of the department. Three periods a week, 
three credits each semester. Miss Rivera. 

Spanish 491- Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three 
credits each semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the 
department.) 




MUSIC/ Professor George E. Luntz, Chairman; Prof essor Bulley ; 
Associate Professors Edson, Chauncey, L. Houston; Assistant 
Professors Baker, Hamer, *Lemoine ; Instructors Chalifoux, 
Sabine, Van Zandt. 



The Department of Music offers a major program in music as 
well as courses that can be chosen as electives by students whose 
primary interests are in other fields. 

The Department of Music is an Institutional Member of the 
National Association of Schools of Music, and its courses are 
fully accredited by that organization. 

A major program requires that a student earn thirty-six credits 
in music, demonstrate functional proficiency in piano, and acquire 
the ability to perform will in some area of applied music.** 
Twenty-four credits must be taken in the following courses: 

Music 181-182, Harmony and Ear Training 6 credits 

Music 281-282, Advanced Harmony and Ear 
Training 6 credits 

Music 305, 306, History of Music 4 credits 

Music 391-392, Counterpoint 4 credits 

Music 491-492, Form and Analysis 4 credits 

Students majoring in music should take Music 181-182 in the 
freshman year. 

Twelve additional credits are to be taken in courses selected 
from the following: 

Music 291 , History of Musical Instruments 

Music 315, Twentieth Century Music 

Music 321-322, Conducting 

Music 395, 396, Orchestration 

Music 175, 176, 275, 276, Band and Orchestra Instruments 

Music 405, 406, Choral Music 

Music 407, 408, Music and English Literature 

Music 415, 416, Opera 

Music 421 , 422, Studies in Musical Style 

Music 495, 496, Composition 

Applied Music 

It is also possible for students to take courses in music in 
addition to those required by the major program. These courses 
may be considered as electives in fulfilling degree requirements. 
However, each student majoring in music should plan her work 
in consultation with the chairman of the department. 



161 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



*On leave 1968-69 

**No Fees For Applied Music. 



The following courses are suggested as valuable electives for the 
student majoring in music: 

Art 111 and 112, Art History 

Dramatic Arts 211, Survey of World Theatre 

Philosophy 212, Aesthetics 

In order to qualify for a Virginia teaching certificate in music, 
students should also take the necessary courses in psychology, 
including three semester hours in Child Psychology or Adolescent 
Psychology; six semester hours in School Music; and six semester 
hours in Supervised Teaching in Music. 

Six semester hours of social science in addition to History of 
the United States and six semester hours of mathematics are 
required for Virginia teacher certification. 

Teacher certification in Virginia also requires eighteen semester 
hours in performance instruction. This includes courses in con- 
ducting, instrumental classes, participation in chorus, band, or 
other regular ensemble groups, and individual instruction in 
applied music. 



162 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Theory of Music 



Music 181- 182— Harmony and Ear Training. 

Fundamentals of music chord-structure and progressions. Figured bass and 
given melodies, dominant sevenths. Original work. Melodic, rhythmic, and 
harmonic dictation, sight-singing and keyboard harmony. Five periods a week. 
Six credits. Miss Van Zandt. 



Music 281- 282— Advanced Harmony and Ear Training. 

Prerequisite: Music 181-182. Advanced harmony and its use in traditional 
musical styles. Modulation, complete dominant harmony, altered chords, 
and enharmonic relationships. Harmonic analysis. Keyboard and ear training 
skills. Five periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Lemoine. 

Music 285, 286 + - Instrumental Sight Reading. 

(Enrollment by permission of instructor.) Class designed to increase sight- 
reading ability by means of both playing and following the printed score. 
Also a retainer course for those who wish to keep up their instrumental 
technique, whether they are currently studying or not. Two periods a week. 
No credit. Mrs. Hamer. 



Music 301, 302; 311, 312- School Music. 

Essentials of school music materials and procedures involved in teaching 
songs, rhythmic and instrumental work, and listening. Coordination with 
other subjects. Course 301-302 (Two hours a week. One credit each semester.) 
is for non-music majors expecting to teach in the elementary grades. Course 



311, 312 (Three hours a week. Three credits each semester.) is for music 
majors who expect to teach music in elementary or secondary schools. Miss 
Chauncey. 

Music 321 , 322 +— Conducting. 

Principles and techniques of conducting, including the study of materials, 
arranging, and program planning. First semester, choral conducting; second 
semester, instrumental conducting. Two periods a week. Two credits each 
semester. Mr. Luntz, Mr. Baker. 

Music 391- 392— Counterpoint. 

Prerequisite or co-requisite: Music 281-282. Elementary contrapuntal techni- 
ques, including double counterpoint at the octave. Two periods a week. 
Four credits. Mr. Lemoine. 

Music 395, 396— Orchestration. 

Techniques of instrumental scoring considered historically and creatively. 
Two periods a week. Four credits. Mr. Baker. 



Music 491 , 492— Form and Analysis. 

Prerequisite: Music 281-282. Structural and harmonic analysis of both large 
and small forms of composition. Two periods a week. Four credits. Mr. 
Luntz. 

Music 495, 496-Composition. 

Prerequisite: Music 281-282. Creative work in smaller forms. Correlative 
study of traditional and contemporary compositional practices. Two periods 
a week. Four credits. Mr. Lemoine. 
History and Literature of Music. 

Music 111, 112+— Survey of Music. 

General survey of music and its relationship to general culture and history. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Staff. 



163 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Music 291— The History of Musical Instruments. 

A study of the evolution of musical instruments in western culture from 
antiquity through the present day with emphasis on performance practices 
of the times and their relationships to the symphony orchestra. Two periods 
per week. Two credits. Mr. Baker. 

Music 305, 306 + — History of Music. 

Study of the development of music from ancient to modern times with 
special correlation of historical and cultural trends. Two periods a week. 
Two credits each semester. Mr. Luntz. 



Music 315— Twentieth Century Music. 

Prerequisite: Music 111-112 or Music 305, 306 or special permission of 
the instructor. The study of twentieth century practices in musical composi- 
tion and their relationships to the historical developments in music. Two 
periods a week. Two credits. Offered each semester. Mr. L. Houston. 



Music 405, 406 + - Choral Music. 

Study of sacred and secular choral literature, including both the vocal 
and interpretative aspects. Consideration of textual as well as musical content. 
Two periods a week. Two credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years. 
Not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Luntz. 

Music 407, 408+- Music and English Literature. 

A study of musical compositions inspired by English literature from Chaucer 
to the present day. (A theoretical and practical background of music is not 
essential for this course) Two periods a week. Two credits each semester. 
(Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Bulley. 

Music 415, 416 + — Opera. 

Literary and musical development of the opera; staging and scenic devices. 
Comparison of operatic styles through study and listening. Two periods a 
week. Two credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 
1969-70.) Mr. Luntz. 



164 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Music 421= 422 + - Studies in Musical Style. 

A study of style related to period, nationality, and individual composers. 
Two periods a week. Four credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 
1969-70.) Mr. Bulley. 

Band and Orchestra Instruments 

Music 175, 176— Beginning String Instruments. 

Class study of playing techniques on string instruments, including reference 
to their historical development and literature. Two periods a week. Two 
credits for the session. (Not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Baker. 



Music 275— Beginning Woodwind and Percussion Instruments. 
Class study of playing techniques on woodwind instruments and on snare 
drum, including reference to their historical development and literature. 
Two periods a week, first semester. One credit. (Offered in 1969-70.) Mr. 
Baker. 

Music 216— Beginning Brass and Percussion Instruments. 

Class study of playing techniques on brass instruments and on percussion 
instruments, including reference to their historical development and literature. 
Two periods a week, second semester. One credit. (Offered in 1969-70.) 
Mr. Baker. 



Band, Chorus, And String Ensemble 

The College maintains a concert band, chorus, and string 
ensemble. Any student may, with the permission of the conductor, 
participate in the band, chorus, or string ensemble, but -will be 



allowed a combined maximum of six credits in ensemble participa- 
tion. However, band, chorus, or string ensemble may be taken 
without credit. Each organization has two rehearsals a week and 
gives one credit each semester. 



Individual Instruction in Music 

Individual lessons in voice, piano, organ, violoncello, harp, 
and woodwinds are offered by the department. 

Credit is allowed for a maximum of twelve semester hours in 
individual instruction. 

For study of above named subjects one credit is allowed for 
one half-hour lesson a week plus one hour of practice daily; two 
credits are allowed for one one-hour lesson or two half-hour 
lessons a week plus two hours of practice daily. 

Instructors in individual lessons are: Mrs. Anne Hamer*; 
violoncello and piano; Mrs. Yvonne Sabine, voice; Mrs. Jean 
Edson, organ; Mr. Levin Houston, piano; Mr. Bernard Lemoine, 
piano; Miss Martha Van Zandt, piano; Mr. George Luntz, 
voice; Mr. James Baker, woodwinds; Miss Jeanne Chalifoux, 
harp. 

*On leave 1968-69. 




165 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



PHILOSOPHY/ Professor E. Boyd Graves, Chairman; Professors 
Leidecker, Van Sant; Assistant Professors Sherwood, Snyder. 



166 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Students who choose a major program in philosophy complete at 
least twenty-four credits in philosophy and twelve credits in related 
subjects in addition to the freshman philosophy (or mathematics) 
course required of all students for the Bachelor of Arts degree. 
The twelve credits of related work are to be selected in consultation 
with the student's adviser. Any 300 or 400 course in appropriate 
departments is acceptable (exceptions are Classics and Religion 
department courses numbered 201 and 202). A list of courses recom- 
mended as related fields is available from the department. 

Majors in philosophy are expected to include the following 
courses comprising the history of philosophy: Philosophy 321, 322, 
401,402. Majors are required to do some reading that is pertinent 
to those philosophy courses in which they do not enroll. This 
complementary reading may be done at any time during the 
student's junior or senior years. The list of readings is available 
from the department. 

A program of Independent Study (tutorial) is offered to highly 
qualified students upon approval by the department. This may 
apply to Philosophy 102 or to specialization in the work of a single 
philosopher or philosphical problem. 



Philosophy 101, 102- Problems in Philosophy. 

Open to freshmen and sophomores only. An introduction to philosophical 
methods and concepts. Three periods a week. Six credits. Staff. 

Philosophy 101, 102 meets the basic degree requirement (alternate with 
mathematics) for the Bachelor of Arts degree and must be taken in the fresh- 
man or sophomore year. In exceptional cases, such as transfer students 
admitted at the begininning of their junior year, the basic requirement may be 
met by earning six credits in the following courses: 

Philosophy 201, Introductory Logic 332, Advanced Logic; 

Philosophy 321, Greek Philosophy; 

Philosophy 322, Medieval Philosophy; 

Philosophy 401, Philosophy Since the Renaissance; 

Philosophy 402, Contemporary Philosophy. 



Philosophy 103— Independent Study. 

The content of Philosophy 102 when done as a tutorial by highly qualified 
students under the direction of a member of the staff. Three credits. 



Philosophy 201— Introductory Logic. 

The elementary principles of valid reasoning to introduce the arts and 
sciences student to logic and language, elementary symbolic logic and simple 
deductive systems. First semester. Three credits. Mr. Van Sant. 

Philosophy 211- Ethics. 

A study of moral values and their expression. Three periods a week. Second 
semester. Three credits. Mr. Graves. 

Philosophy 212— Aesthetics. 

A study of philosophies of art. Three periods a week. First semester. Three 
credits. Mr. Graves. 

Philosophy 304— American Philosophy. 

A study of philosophical ideas in America from colonial times to their 
reorientation between World Wars I and II. Three periods a week. Three 
credits. Mr. Leidecker. 



Philosophy 311 — Philosophies of India. 

An approach to the major thought systems of India and their modifica- 
tions throughout the Orient. Three periods a week. Three credits. (Offered 
in alternate years; offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Leidecker. 

Philosophy 312— Philosophies of China and Japan. 

An examination of the more indigenous thought structures of China and 
Japan. Three periods a week. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years; 
not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Leidecker. 



167 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Philosophy 313— The Philosophy of Buddhism. 

A survey of the ethics of the Buddha, the Abhidhamma portion of the 
Buddhist canon, the main schools of the Theravada and Mahayana tradi- 
tions with their principal exponents, and the origin and meaning of Zen. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Leidecker. 

Philosophy 321- Greek Philosophy. 

A survey of Greek thought and its influence. Three periods a week. 
First semester. Three credits. Mr. Sherwood. 

Philosophy 322— Medieval Philosophy. 

A survey of scholastic philosophy. Three periods a week. Second semester. 
Three credits. Mr. Van Sant. 



Philosophy 331 — Philosophies of History. 

A study of the major theories concerning human events. Two periods a 
week. Second semester. Two credits. (Offered in alternate years; not offered 
in 1969-70.) Mr. Graves. 



Philosophy 332— Advanced Logic. 

Theory of formal systems: applied criteria of consistency, completeness, 
and decisional procedures, development of quantification theory, Godel's 
proof, approaches to the justification of logic, and other advanced topics. 
Prerequisite: Philosophy 221 or completion of six hours in mathematics. 
Second semester. Three credits. Mr. Snyder. 

Philosophy 344— History of Scientific Thought. 

A study of the classics in the development of scientific thinking. Special 
attention is given to the significant discoveries, the methods and the pre- 
suppositions which have characterized the different phases of the development 
of science. Prerequisite: eight semester hours of laboratory science. Three 
periods a week. Second semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years; 
not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Van Sant. 

Philosophy 352— Philosophy East and West. 

A comparative study and evaluation of the major concepts in Oriental 
and Western Philosophies based upon global perspectives. Three periods 
a week. Second semester. Three credits. Mr. Leidecker. 



168 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Philosophy 361 — Metaphysics. 

A study of problems such as being, space, time, causality, and freedom 
that are basic to an intellectual comprehension of the universe and the pro- 
cesses of mind and nature. Three periods a week. Three credits. (Offered 
in alternate years; not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Leidecker. 

Philosophy 401— Philosophy Since the Renaissance. 

Three periods a week. First semester. Three credits. Mr. Snyder. 



Philosophy 402— Contemporary Philosophy. 

Three periods a week. Second semester. Three credits. Mr. Snyder. 

Philosophy 411— Philosophy of Education. 

A study of the development of educational theories. Three periods a week. 
First semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years; not offered in 1969- 
70.) Mr. Graves. 



Philosophy 421 — Symbolism. 

A course dealing with the philosophic basis of symbol formation as a uni- 
versal category. Origin, function and value of symbol and metaphor are 
traced in diverse cultures, from primitive to Oriental and Western, and as 
many fields as possible from metapsychology, religious iconography, myth 
construction and art to the humanistic disciplines, literature and system build- 
ing in metaphysics. Second semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate 
years; offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Leidecker. 



Philosophy 490— Readings in Philosophy. 

Open to all philosophy majors and otherwise qualified students of junior 
and senior status who desire to become more familiar with the philosophical 
literature in a field previously selected by the philosophy department after 
consultation with the students. The emphasis is upon intensive reading, with 
group discussion of the selections read. Three periods a week. Three credits. 
Staff. 

Philosophy 491, 492— Independent Study. 

Tutorial under the direction of a member of the staff. Three to six credits 
(by permission of the department). 



PHYSICS/ Associate Professor G. Preston Burns, Chairman; 
Associate Professor Edson; Assistant Professor Atalay; Instructor 
Druzbick. 



A major program in physics requires thirty-six semester hours 
of credit, of which thirty must be in physics, including Physics 
391-392 and 471-472, and six must be in Mathematics 211-212. 

Students majoring in physics must choose courses in their 
major program in consultation with a representative of the de- 
partment. 

In addition to General Physics, the more advanced courses 
listed below will be offered in 1969-70 in accordance with the 
demand. 



169 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Physics 201- 202- General Physics. 

An introductory course in mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, and light. 
One double and three single periods a week. Eight credits. Staff. 

Physics 203, 204— Physics Problems. 

Application of principles of physics to supplement the regular lecture work 
in Physics 201-202. One single period a week. One credit each semester. 
Staff. 

Physics 391- 392— Electricity and Magnetism. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212 and Physics 201-202. Three singleperiods 
and one double period a week. Eight credits. Mr. Atalay. 



Physics 451, 452— Heat and Thermodynamics. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212 and Physics 201-202. (Physics 451 is 
prerequisite to Physics 452.) Three single periods a week. Six credits. Mr. 
Burns. 



Physics 471- 472— Mechanics. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212 and Physics 201-202. 
periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Burns. 



Three single 



Physics 481 , 482- Sound. Optics. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212 and Physics 201-202. Three singleperiods 
a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Burns. 

Physics 491— Quantum Mechanics. 

Prerequisite: Physics 301, 302, 471-472 and Mathematics 211-212. An 
introduction to quantum mechanics including basic postulates, solution of 
the wave equation, energy calculations using the wave function, and the 
relativistic wave equations. Three single periods a week. Three credits. Mr. 
Burns. 

Physics 492— Statistical Physics. 

Prerequisite: Physics 451 and 471. A study of probability, classical statistical 
mechanics, quantum statistics, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics, with 
applications to various systems. Three single periods a week. Three credits. 
Staff. 



170 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Physics 493- 494— Honors in Physics. 

Independent study and investigation of a research problem in physics. 
Open to qualified senior majors with permission of the staff. Eight credits. 
Staff. 



PSYCHOLOGY/ Professor James R.Nazzaro, Chairman; Professor 
Dodd; Associate Professor M. A. Kelly; Assistant Professors 
Thomas, Chipman, Phifer, Weinstock, Todorov, Mavrides. 



A major program in psychology requires thirty-six credits in 
psychology and related fields of study. 

Twenty-four of these required credits must be earned in courses 
in psychology other than Psychology 201-202. Statistics, History 
of Psychology, and one semester of Experimental Psychology are 
required courses for all major students who wish to receive a 
Bachelor of Arts degree. Those students electing a Bachelor of 
Science degree must meet the general requirements as stated on 
page 74. In addition, these students must take one year of Ex- 
perimental Psychology and take their related fields in the natural 
sciences. Twelve hours from specific related fields of study or in 
advanced courses in psychology should be selected by the student in 
consultation with her departmental adviser. 



Psychology 201-202, General Psychology, is a prerequisite for all 300 and 
400 psychology courses. 

Psychology 201-202— General Psychology. 

Fundamental principles of human behavior; biological antecedents; motiva- 
tion; perception; learning; individual differences; intelligence; and personality. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. Staff. 

Psychology 261— Elementary Statistics. 

A consideration of basic statistical concepts such as central tendency, 
variability, and probability; a study of inferential techniques including cor- 
relation, regression, t-tests, analysis of variance, and chi-square. Three periods 
a week. Three credits. Miss Mavrides. 

Psychology 301- Social Psychology. 

The interrelationships between the individual and his social environment. 
Social in/luences upon motivation, perception, and behavior. The develop- 
ment of change of attitudes and opinions. Psychological analysis of small 
groups, social stratification, and mass phenomena. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. Miss Phifer. 



Psychology 311 — Abnormal Psychology. 

Abnormalities of sensation, perception, memory, thinking, emotion, in- 
telligence, motor activity, and personality; study of neurotic and psychotic 
syndromes. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Todorov. 

Psychology 331- Developmental Psychology: The Child. 

Study of the development of the individual from conception to adolescence. 
Emphasis is placed on physical, intellectual, emotional and social growth. 
Current research relevant to the field is given special attention. Three periods 
a week. Three credits. Mrs. Dodd. 



171 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Psychology 332- Developmental Psychology: The Adolescent. 

A survey of the major theories and research on adolescent development 
with special focus upon the dynamics of personality organization. An ex- 
amination of the various problems encountered during the adolescent years. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Thomas. 

Psychology 342— Psychology of Personality. 

A study of personality structure, dynamics, development, and methods 
of research. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mrs. Dodd. 



Psychology 345— Psychology of Learning. 

The theoretical and experimental basis of learning as postulated by Hull, 
Skinner, Thorndike, Tolman, Guthrie, Mowrer, and others. Three credits. 
Mr. Weinstock. 



Psychology 362— Psychology of Exceptional Children. 

A study of exceptional children— the physically handicapped; the mentally 
retarded; the mentally gifted; and the emotional deviate. A survey of current 
attempts to provide programs to meet the specialized needs of such children. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Mrs. Dodd. 

Psychology 311— Experimental Psychology: Operant Conditioning. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 261. An analysis of behavior utilizing the principles 
and procedures of operant conditioning. Laboratory work concentrated on the 
rat. Two lectures and one four-hour laboratory period a week. Four credits. 
Mr. Todorov. 

Psychology 312— Experimental Psychology: Sensory Processes. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 261. The use of psychophysical methods and 
experimental techniques in the investigation of sensation. Individual experi- 
ments are conducted employing human subjects. Three lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory period a week. Four credits. Miss Mavrides. 



172 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Psychology 313— Experimental Psychology: Human Learning. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 261. An examination of data and theory in such 
areas of human performance as verbal learning, transfer of training, perceptual- 
motor skills, and problem solving. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period a week. Four credits. Mr. Weinstock. 

Psychology 401- Psychological Tests and Measurements. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 261. Theory of test construction; development, 
interpretation, and uses of tests of general and special abilities; and the 
techniques of handling data. Three single and one two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Four credits. Mr. Chipman. 



Psychology 421— History of Psychology. 
A survey of the historical antecedents of modern psychology, 
a week. Three credits. Mr. Weinstock. 



Three periods 



Psychology 422-423— Con temporary Viewpoints in Psychology. 
A study of the problems and viewpoints of current psychology, 
periods a week. Three credits. Miss Phifer. 



Three 



Psychology 432— Comparative Psychology. 

The study of the behavior of infrahuman organisms. Selected topics from 
both comparative psychology and ethology include tropisms, interactions of 
innate factors and learning, sensory capacities, and behavior morphology. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Chipman. 



Psychology 441-442— Individual Research. 

The problems studied will be determined by individual interests. Each 
student will be responsible for library investigation and/or research. By 
permission of the instructor. Hours to be arranged. Three credits. Staff. 




Psychology 446— Physiological Psychology. 

Prerequisite: Biology 121-122. A critical survey of the physiological cor- 
relates of behavior with special emphasis on sensory and motor processes, 
neurophysiological mechanisms, psychopharmacology, endocrine effects, emo- 
tion and bodily needs, learning and conditioning. Three single and one two- 
hour laboratory periods a week for the second semester. Four credits. Mr. 
Chipman. 



173 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Psychology 451— Psychology of Motivation. 

The study of the origins and development of motivating forces and their 
effects on behavior. Emphasis is given to the development of psychological 
theories as attempts to explain motivation, together with supporting experi- 
mental data. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. 
Weinstock. 



The Honors Program in Psychology 

A student may graduate with Honors in Psychology by meeting 
the following criteria: 

1. An overall gradepoint average of 3.0 and a gradepoint 
average of 3.3 in psychology must be attained at the end 
of seven semesters' work. 

2. The student must complete with a minimum grade of B 
Psychology 441, Individual Research. This may be taken 
the junior year if the instructor feels that the student is 
sufficiently prepared. 

3. The student must be at or above the 90th percentile on 
the Advanced Test of the Graduate Record Examination. 



RELIGION/ Associate Professor Elizabeth A. Clark, Chairman; 
Assistant Professor Cooper. 

A student majoring in religion must take at least 24 credits in 
religion courses (12 of which must be numbered 300 or higher) 
and 12 credits in related fields (all of which must be worked out 
in consultation with her adviser). A six credit seminar consisting 
of a year's work of readings and discussion culminating in the 
completion of a senior paper is required of all majors. 

At the beginning of the second semester of her senior year, 
a major is required to pass a written examination in the field of 
religion which she has prepared for through introductory course 
work and private study. A make-up examination is offered when 
necessary. 

A distinguished performance on the written examination and 
senior paper, in addition to a high grade average in religion 
course work, entitles a major to be graduated with Honors in 
Religion. 



174 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Religion 101- Old Testament. 

An historical survey of ,the institutions and beliefs of ancient Israel to the 
close of the Old Testament period. First semester. Three credits. Staff. 

Religion 102— New Testament. 

Major themes of the New Testament studied in relation to the origin and 
theological background of the New Testament books. Second semester. Three 
credits. Staff. 



Religion 201, 202 + - The Western Religious Heritage. 

An examination of the historical and theological development of Judaism 
and of Christianity (early church, Roman Catholic and Protestant). Three 
periods a week. Three credits each semester. Miss Clark. 

Religion 213, 214 + — An Introduction to Theological Thinking. 

A study of the problems that modernity poses for religious thought and 
faith. The first semester deals with the question and meaning of God, and the 
interpretation of man. The second semester deals with the problem of historical 
relativity, the meaning of a christology, and the character of a Christian 
ethic. The accent throughout is on contemporaneity. Three credits each 
semester. Mr. Cooper. 



Religion 239— Christian Ethics and Social Change. 

A study of some of the major social problems that confront contemporary 
American life as seen from the perspective of a modern Christian faith. 
Readings in literature from the social sciences and theology. Three credits. 
Mr. Cooper. 



Religion 301 — Readings in Hellenistic Religions. 

A selected study of later Greek and Roman religions, and the reaction 
of Judaism and Christianity to contemporary intellectual and political develop- 
ments. One two-hour sessions a week. First semester. Three credits. Miss 
Clark. 

Religion 306— Readings in Patristic Literature. 

Prerequisites: either Religion 102 or 201 . Studies of the dogma and institu- 
tions of early Christianity. One two-hour period a week. Second semester. 
Three credits. Miss Clark. 

Religion 311- The Problem of God. 

A critical analysis of traditional and contemporary conceptions of deity 
and an exploration of the meaning of God in relation to man's understand- 
ing of himself and his culture. Three credits. Mr. Cooper. 

Religion 331 — Studies in Historical Theology. 

The intensive study of a particular problem, theologian, or historical 
era. 1969-70: Nineteenth Century Studies. Three credits. Miss Clark. 



Religion 366— Readings in Theological Ethics. 

A close analytical study of significant ethical writings in modern religious 
thought. The course will deal with ethical themes raised by such men as H. 
Richard Niebuhr, Norman Brown, Paul Tillich and Martin Buber. Three 
credits. Mr. Cooper. 

Religion 401- 402— Senior Seminar. 

The first semester's study involves all senior majors and staff in readings 
and discussion. The second semester of the seminar will be devoted to the 
preparation of a senior paper under the guidance of a department member. 
Six credits for the year. Staff. 



175 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Religion 491, 492, 493, 494- Independent Study. 

Individual work under the guidance of a member of the department. 
Three credits a semester. By permission of the department. 



SOCIOLOGY/ Professor Philip J. Allen , Chairman; Professors 
L. C. Carter, Sletten; Assistant Professor Jessen; Instructor 
Jones. 



A major program in sociology requires the thirty-six credits 
in sociology and related fields of study. Twenty-four of these 
required credits must be earned in sociology courses in addition 
to Sociology 201-202. The twelve additional credit hours in re- 
lated fields may be selected by the student in consultation with her 
departmental adviser. 



Sociology 201 — Principles of Sociology. 

A study of the basic characteristics of group life; development of society 
and culture; interaction between persons and groups. Three periods a week 
for the first semester. Three credits. Staff. 

Sociology 202— Social Problems. 

Social change; social and personal disorganization; mobility; delinquency, 
crime; industrial and other group conflicts. Three periods a week for the 
second semester. Three credits. Staff. 

Sociology 301-302— Introduction to Anthropology. 

First semester foci: history of anthropology, physical anthropology, and 
archaeology. Second semester foci: ethnology, ethnography, linguistics, and 
primitive art. Three periods a week. Six credits. Mr. Carter. 

Sociology 303— Culture and Personality. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. Impact of culture and social structure 
upon the individual, and of socially sanctioned goals and values upon per- 
sonal attitudes and behavior, with special focus upon behavior disorders. 
Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Mr. Allen, Miss 
Jones. 



176 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Sociology 'Ml— Population. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. Analysis of historical and contemporary 
population composition and change, and how demographic structure is related 
to economic, political, religious and kinship structures. Three periods a week 
for first semester. Three credits. Mr. Jessen. 



Sociology 312— Migration. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. Analysis of population movements, 
their causes, and effects. Foci: 19th and 20th century migrations and how 
these are related to contemporary economic and industrial development. 
Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. Jessen. 

Sociology 313— Urban Society. 

Origin, character and significance of urban and metropolitan communities. 
Common problems of city living; ecological factors in growth of cities and 
their influence upon social behavior. Three periods a week for the second 
semester. Mr. Jessen. 



Sociology 331— The Family. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. A historical, social- 
psychological and cultural study of mate selection, courtship, marriage and 
family relations. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. 
Mr. Allen. 



Sociology 332- Social Welfare Work. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. A study of problems, 
methods and policies in the field of social welfare. Three periods a week 
for the first semester. Three credits. Mr. Allen. 

Sociology 341- American Society. 

Analysis of major value patterns and institutions of American society and 
their interrelations, as well as of kinship, occupation, and authority systems. 
Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. (Offered in 
alternate years, not offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Sletten. 

Sociology Ml- Occupations and Social Structure. 

Analysis of major occupational roles; of relationships between occupation 
and kinship organization, as well as of social stratification, social philosophies, 
and political action. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three 
credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1969-70.) Mr. Sletten. 

Sociology 351— Juvenile Delinquency. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. A sociological analysis 
of the nature, extent, causes and treatment of juvenile delinquency. Three 
periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. Jessen. 

Sociology 352— Criminology. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. Delinquency and crime; 
nature and extent; causal theories; present trends and programs of treatment. 
Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. Allen. 

Sociology 353— Social Control. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. An analysis of social 
institutional norms; how they regulate and control individual behavior, in- 
ducing compliance with authority. Three periods a week for the first semester. 
Three credits. Miss Jones. 

Sociology 362— Methods of Social Research. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. Methods of investigating selected prob- 
lems of current importance with emphasis upon individual work. Three 
periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Mr. Sletten. 



777 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Sociology 402- Sociology of Child Development. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. The emergence of 
personality with the child's socially defined roles in primary groups; social 
formation of attitudes through interaction with siblings, parents and peers. 
Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. Allen, 
Miss Jones. 



Sociology 421— Human Relations. 

Racial and ethnic groups in America; minority-group consciousness; marginal 
persons and groups; inter-group tension, conflict, accommodation and co- 
operation. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. 
Mr. Carter. 

Sociology All— Sociology of Religion. 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. A study of social factors in the origin, develop- 
ment and function of religious institutions, with emphasis upon the basic 
principles of Judeo-Christian tradition. Three periods a week for the first 
semester. Three credits. Mr. Carter. 

Sociology 431—Sociology of Leadership. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. Causes and consequences 
of social stratification and social mobility; impact of culture, social structure 
and social interaction upon occupational achievement, personal creativity, 
inventiveness and leadership. Three periods a week for the second semester. 
Three credits. Mr. Allen. 

Sociology 4S1— History of Social Theory. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. A study of theories in the historical 
development of sociology. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three 
credits. 



178 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



Sociology 482— Contemporary Sociological Theory. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. An analysis of current sociological 
theory. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. 
Sletten. 



Sociology 489, 490— Individual Study and Research. 

Not a regularly given course, but available to qualified students with the 
agreement of members of the department. Reading and research with a pro- 
ject or paper, under the guidance of a member of the department. Offered 
as required either semester. Three credits. Staff. 

Sociology 491— General Readings. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. Selected works ranging over the 
"sociological classics." Three credits. Staff. 



Sociology 492— Special Readings. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology plus Sociology 491. Selected readings 
from various specialized areas within the field of sociology: cultural anthropo- 
logy, marriage and the family, social welfare, delinquency and crime, popula- 
tion, minority groups, social organization, social theory, and the sociology 
of religion. Three credits. Staff. 



The Corporation of the University 

Legal Title 

The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia' 1 

The Rector of the University 

Frank W. Rogers 

The Visitors of the University 



180 



DIRECTORY 



C. Waller Barrett Charlottesville 

William M. Birdsong Suffolk 

Emma Ziegler Brown Richmond 

Richard S. Cross Lafayette Hill, Pennsylvania 

J. Hartwell Harrison Boston 

W. Wright Harrison Virginia Beach 

Walkle y E. Johnson Exmore 

Edwin L. Kendig, Jr Richmond 

J. Sloan Kuykendall Winchester 

Joseph H. McConnell Richmond 

Molly Vaughan Parrish Newport News 

William S. Potter Wilmington, Delaware 

Frank W. Rogers Roanoke 

Lewis M. Walker, Jr Petersburg 

C. Stuart Wheatley, Jr Danville 

J. Harvie Wilkinson, Jr Richmond 

Weldon Cooper The Secretary of the Visitors 





Administration 

Edgar Finley Shannon, Jr., A.B., A.M., D.Phil. (Oxon), 
Litt.D., LL.D., D.Hum President of the University 

Office of the Chancellor 

Grellet Collins Simpson, B.A., M.A. Ph.D., LL.D 

Chancellor of Mary Washington College 

Michael Houston, B.A. , M.A Assistant to the Chancellor 

Gail G. Braxton, B.A Director of Personnel 

Thomas P. Mann, B.A Director of Information Services 

J. M. H. Willis, Jr., B.A., LL.B Associate Legal 

Adviser of the College 

Anne A. Moyse Secretary to the Chancellor jgj 

Lucretia Oesterheld Secretary to the 

Assistant to the Chancellor DIRECTORY 

Sybil A. McCrory Secretary to the Director of 

Information Services 

Office of the Dean 

Reginald W. Whidden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Dean of the College 

James H. Croushore, A.B., A.M., Ph.D Associate Dean 

of the College 
Jane N. Saladin, B.M.E. , M.M Registrar and 

Director of Financial Aid 
Helen H. Thomas Administrative Assistant to the 

Director of Financial Aid 

Laura Voelkel Sumner, A.B., M.A. , Ph.D Director of 

the Summer Session 

Eloise Johnson Browning Secretary to the Dean 

Martha Lukes Harding Secretary to the Associate Dean 

Bonn i e Clore Secretary 

Audrey Smith Hurlock Recorder, Secretary to the Registrar 

Jane Hubler Marra, B.S Secretary, Office of the Registrar 

Mary Dempsey Shover Secretary 

Nancy Carter Clerk 



Office of the Dean of Students 

Margaret Hargrove, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., L.H.D Dean of 

Students 

Mildred A. Droste, B.S., M.Ed Assistant Dean of Students 

Claire Talley Booker Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Mildred C. Gilman Secretary to the Assistant 

Dean of Students 

Office of the Comptroller 

Edgar E. Woodward, B.S Comptroller 

Edward V. Allison, Jr., B.S Business Manager 

Gloria S. Day Secretary to the Comptroller 

Carolyn Bryce Secretary to the Business Manager 

Sherry Lancaster Clerk 

Office of the Director of Student Affairs 

Emily A. Holloway, B.S. Director of Student Affairs 

l$2 Lefa Poe Faulkner Director of Residential Facilities 

Ruth C. Willetts Secretary to the Director of 

DIRECTORY Student Affairs 

Sandra T. Elkins Secretary 

Office of the Director of Admissions 

Albert Ray Merchent, B.A., M.Ed., D.Ed Director of 

Admissions 

Hilda R. Sagun Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

Katherine L. Blake Records Clerk 

Betty Luttrell Secretary 

Carolyn Thomas Clerk 

Counselling Center 

Mary A. K. Kelly B.A., M.A Director 

Trina Ann Mazaitis B.A Administrative Assistant 



183 



Library 

Daniel Holt Woodward, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Librarian- Elect 

B.A., M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Marguerite L. Carder, A.B., B.S. in L.S Acting Librarian 

A.B., College of William and Mary; B.S. in L.S., University of North 
Carolina. 

Marian Reed Watts, A.B., B.S. in L.S Head Cataloguer 

A.B., Goucher College; B.S. in L.S., Drexel Institute of Technology. 

Charles David Balthis, B.A. , MS. in L.S Assistant 

Cataloguer 
B.A., Randolph-Macon College; M.S. in L. S., Catholic University. 

Renna Hardy Cosner, A.B., A.M. L.S Circulation Librarian 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; A.M.L.S., University of Michi- 
gan. 

Sylvia L. Keating, B.A Library Assistant 

B.A., University of Southwestern Louisiana. 

Janie Morgan Kash, B.A Library Assistant-Serials 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College DIRECTORY 

Reed Kilduff Simmons, B.A Library Assistant-Circulation 

B.A., Mary Washington College. 

* Barbara Alden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Library Assistant 

B.A., M.A., Wellesley College; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Dorothy A. D. Barrett Catalogue Typist 

Marian Stevens Holt Acquisitions Clerk and Secretary 

Mildred Brooks Ray Catalogue Typist 

Margaret Jones Smith Circulation Clerk 

Health Services 

Clement Jay Robbins, III, B.S., M.D College Physician 

B.S., Hampden-Sydney College; M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

Louis B. Massad, B.S., M.D Associate Physician 

B.S., Virginia Military Institute; M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

*On leave 1968-69 



184 



DIRECTORY 




Lawrence Moter , M.D Associate Physician 

M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

David B. Rice, B.A., M.D Associate Physician 

B.A., M.D., University of Virginia. 

Inez Frye Watson, R.N Head Nurse 

R.N., Broadlawns Hospitals, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Virginia H. Cullen, R.N Nurse 

R.N., Syracuse Memorial School of Nursing. 

Bessie Thomas Olive, R.N Nurse 

R. N., Mary Washington Hospital Training School. 

Dorothy T. Shannon, R.N Nurse 

R.N., Sarah Leigh Hospital, Norfolk. 

Charlotte Harris White, R.N Nurse 

R.N., Johnston-Willis Hospital, Richmond. 

Pearline Soltes, R.N Relief Nurse 

R.N., Mary Washington Hospital Training School. 

Merton Nugent , R.N Relief Nurse 

R.N., Petersburg Hospital School of Nursing. 

Eleanor M. Pettit Relief Nurse 



Administrative and Personnel Services 

Doris V. Bourne Chief Operator, Switchboard 

Bobby W. Carter Supervisor, Tabulating Office 

Jessie F. Colvin Operator, Switchboard 

Rebecca Lynn Davis Clerk, Visitor's Information Desk 

Janet J. DeShazo Payroll Supervisor 

June M. Ellis Night Operator, Switchboard 

Louis Jacobs Embrey Bookkeeper 

Barbara Y. Ferrara Disbursing Clerk 

Josephine S. Henshaw Payroll Clerk 

Fern Jones Operator, Switchboard 



Linda M. Martin Tabulating Clerk 

Frances S. Melle Cashier 

Jane R. Shelton Disbursing Clerk 

Ronna F. Simpson Duplicating Services Supervisor 

Joyce J. Woodson Clerk Messenger, Mail Room 

Alumnae Association 

Ann Louise Perinchief, B.A Director of Alumnae Affairs 

Joy S. Toombs Secretary 

Carolyn M. Whitaker Clerk 

Bookstore 

Charles L. Read Manager 

Judith Tollett Secretary 

Lucille H. Dent Clerk 

Velma Mead s Clerk 

Lucille O' Bi er Clerk 

Elizabeth Soden Clerk 

Buildings and Grounds 

Vincent H. Willetts Superintendent 

Robe rt E. Re vell Supervisor 

Juanita S. Newton Secretary to the Superintendent 

Food Services 

Pal Robison Food Service Director 

Selma Shelton Manager, College Shop 

Whiting B. Lee Assistant to the Director 

Mildred J. McGinniss Assistant to the Director 

David H. Stack Assistant to the Director 

Cecelia Emma Baker Secretary to the Director 

Maud H. Conway Hostess, Dining Hall 

Evelyn Holmes Hostess, Dining Hall 

Annie S. Gallant Hostess, Dining Hall 

Mary W. Jones Hostess, Dining Hall 

Ina Pitts Hostess, Dining Hall 

Joy G. Rankins Hostess, Dining Hall 




185 



DIRECTORY 



" - ~~~ ~~ 




186 



DIRECTORY 



Placement Bureau 

A. Isabel Gordon Director of the Placement Bureau 

Ma ryD. Ross Secretary 

Donna M. Mills Clerk 

Security 

Medford D. Haynes Chief, Campus Police 

Charles W. Jones Deputy Chief, Campus Police 

Daniel W. Bishop Campus Policeman 

William A. Chewning Campus Policeman 

Harold B. English Campus Policeman 

James E. Patton Campus Policeman 

Howard R. Rose Campus Policeman 

William R. Viar Campus Policeman 

Residence Halls 

Marguerite Chesson Asbell Residence Director, 

Betty Lewis Hall 
Margaret G. Chase Complex Director, Tri- Unit- 
Westmoreland Hall 

Anne Copeland Clark Senior Assistant, 

Westmoreland Hall 

Viriginia E. Conklin Complex Director, 

Randolph Hall— Mason Hall 

Patricia L. Cox Senior Assistant, Bushnell Hall 

Susie G. Embrey Substitute Alternate Residence Director 

Virginia Gallamore Residence Director, Willard Hall 

Mari on G. George Residence Director, Virginia Hall 

Mary Jane Hamilton Alternate Residence Director 

Nellie F. Henry Complex Director, Jefferson Hall— 

Bushnell Hall 

Lynn Marie Pierce Hall President, Marye Hall 

Helen H. Prasse Complex Director, Marshall Hall- 
Russell Hall 

Marilyn L. Preble Hall President, Framar 

Alyce Jo Sydenstricker Senior Assistant, Russell Hall 

F. Dianne Taylor Hall President, Trench Hill 

Sally Jane Taylor Hall President, Brent Hall 

Virginia A. Wemmerus Senior Assistant, Mason Hall 



Faculty 

Vladimir V. Brenner 

Professor Emeritus of Modern Foreign Languages 

State Gymnasium of Moscow; Officer of Academic Degree, Military 
Academy, Tver, Russia. 

Louis J. Cabrera, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., University of Dubuque; M. A., University of Maine; Doctor of Letters 
and Philosophy, University of Madrid. 

Oscar Haddon Darter, A.B., A.M., Ed.D. 
Professor Emeritus of History 

A.B., State Teachers College, Ada, Oklahoma; A.M., Columbia Uni- 
versity; Ed.D., George Washington University. 
James Harvey Dodd, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus of Economics and Business Administration 

A.B., Western Kentucky State College; A.M., Ph.D., George Peabody 

College. 
Milton H. Stansbury, A.B., Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Brown University; Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania. 
Dorothy Duggan Van Winckel, B.S., M.A. 187 

Professor Emeritus of Art nTRFPTORV 

B.S., University of Tennessee; M.A. in Fine Arts, Peabody College; LJ LSS.n^ LVJ R. I 

Student, Art Students' League, New York City, and Pennsylvania Academy 

of Fine Arts. 

********** 

Professors 

Philip James Allen, A.B., M.A., B.D., Ph.D. 

Professor of Sociology 
A.B., Ohio Northern University; M.A., Northwestern University; B.D., 
Garret Theological Seminary; Ph.D., American University. 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Guenndolyn A. Beeler, A.A., B.S., M.A. 
Professor of Home Economics 

A. A., Kansas City Junior College; B.S., Kansas State College; M.A., 

Columbia University. 

Rachel Jane Benton, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
B.A., De Pauw University; M.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 




JULIEN BlNFORD 

Professor of Art 

Graduate, Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson Fellowship for study in 
France, Virginia Museum Senior Fellowship, Rosenwald Fellowship. Repre- 
sented in permanent collections of Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Uni- 
versity of Georgia, University of Nebraska, Art Institute of Chicago, 
Museum of the State of Washington, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 
Springfield Museum, New Britain Museum, Oberlin College, and others. 

Samuel O. Bird, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Geology 
B.S., Marshall College; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina. 

Zoe Wells Carroll Black, B.A., A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Biology 
B.A., University of Tennessee; A.M., Ph.D., Duke University. 

Mildred McMurtry Bolling, A.B., A.M. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Colorado College; A.M., University of Missouri; diploma, Institut 

dePhonetique, University of Paris. 

Stanley F. Bulley, Mus. Bac, Mus. Doc 
Professor of Music 

L.R.A.M., Royal Academy of Music, London; A.R.C.O., Royal College 
188 of Music, London; Royal School of Church Music, London; Mus. Bac, 

Mus. Doc, University of Toronto. 

Hobart C. Carter, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Central Missouri State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Luther Clyde Carter, Jr., B.A., B.D., Ph.D. 
Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Carson-Newman College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 

Yale University. 
William A. Castle, B.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Biology 

B.S., Denison University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Herbert Lee Cover, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

James Henry Croushore, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

A.B., A.M., Lehigh University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Eileen Kramer Dodd, Ph.B., M. A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology 

Ph.B., Muhlenberg College; M.A., Ph.D., New York University. 

Benjamin W. Early, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., Duke University. 



DIRECTORY 



Samuel Thomas Emory, Jr. , A.B. , M.A. , Ph.D. 
Professor of Geography 

A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
Lewis Perley Fickett, Jr., A.B., L.L.B., Ph.D. 
Professor of Political Science 

A.B., Bowdoin College; L.L.B., Ph.D., Harvard University. 
E. Boyd Graves, A.B., A.M., Ed.D. 
Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., A.M., College of William and Mary; Ed.D., George Washington 

University. 

Marion A. Greene, A.B. , M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Tufts College; M.A., Radcliffe College; Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina. 

William Wayne Griffith, A.B., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Harvard University; B.S. in L.S., 

Drexel Institute; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Richard E. Grove, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Visiting Professor in Computer Science 

B.S., Randolph-Macon College; M.A., Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D., 

Syracuse University. iog 

Margart Hargrove, A.B. , A.M., Ph.D., L.H.D. 

Professor of Classics DIRECTORY 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; A.M., Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity; L.H.D., Lake Erie College. 

Henry Weldon Hewetson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A., University of British Columbia; 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Miriam Bowes Hoge, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Pennsylvania. 

Anna Scott Hoye, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Biology 

A. B., Lynchburg College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Earl G. Insley, B.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

B.S.,Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Walter Butler Kelly, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 




190 



DIRECTORY 



Roger Lee Kenvin, A.B., M.A., M.F.A., D.F.A. 
Professor of Dramatic Arts and Speech 

A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., Harvard University; M.F.A., D.F.A. , 

Yale University. 

Pauline Grace King, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Art 

B.S., Mary Washington College; Art Institute of Chicago; M. A., George 

Peabody College; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Albert R. Klein, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Dramatic Arts and Speech 

B.A., State University of Iowa; M.A., University of North Carolina; 

Ph.D., University of Denver. 

Kurt F. Leidecker, B.A., A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., A.M.; Oberlin College; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Almont Lindsey, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of History 

B.S., Knox College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
George E. Luntz, B.M., M.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M., Dana School of Music; Graduate, Master Class, Vienna 

Conservatory; Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 
Helen Reese Luntz, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Wilson College; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Clifton B. McIntosh, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Sidney H. Mitchell, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

A.B., Swarthmore College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
James Russell Nazzaro, B. A. , A.M. , Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Queens College; A.M., Ph.D., Columbia University. 
William C. Pinschmidt, Jr. , B.S. , M.S. , Ph.D. 
Professor of Biology 

B.S., Mount Union College; M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Duke 

University. 

Claudia Moore Read, B.S., M.A. 

Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., 
New York University. Special Study, Wigman School, Berlin, Germany, 
Humphrey- Weidman Studio, and Bennington School of Dance. 



Carmen Lucila Rivera, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M. A., Florida State College for Women; 

Ph.D., University of Salamanca. 
Robert Harrison Shaw, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Carroll College; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. George 

Washington University. 
Grellet Collins Simpson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D. 
Professor of English 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia; 

LL.D., Randolph-Macon College. 
Charles Alfred Sletten, B.A., A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Virginia; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Mary Ellen Stephenson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Westhampton College; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., University 

of Chicago. 
Laura Voelkel Sumner, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Classics 

A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. jqj 

♦Raiford E. Sumner, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. DTRFrTHRV 

Professor of Political Science VLKE^ 1 UK Y 

B.A., University of Tennessee; M.A., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., 

Louisiana State University. 

Joseph Carroll Vance, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
George M. Van Sant, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., St. John's College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Reginald Wilbur Whidden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., McMaster University; Ph.D., Yale University. 
Lawrence Arndt Wishner, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. University of Maryland. 
♦Daniel Holt Woodward, B.A. , M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., Yale University. 
********** 



*On leave 1968-69 




Associate Professors 

Margery E. Arnold, B.S., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., Russell Sage College; M.A., Columbia University. 
Juliette Breffort Blessing 
Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

Licence-es-Lettres, University of Lille; Diplome d'Ecole des Sciences 

Politiques, University of Paris; Diplome d' Etudes Superieures, University 

of Paris. 

Joseph Bozicevic, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.S., Juniata College; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., Georgetown 

University. 

Nathaniel Hapgood Brown, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Princeton University; M.A., Syracuse University; Ph.D., Columbia 

University. 

Grover Preston Burns, A.B., M.S. 

Associate Professor of Physics 

A.B., Marshall College; M.S., West Virginia University. 

192 Marion K. Chauncey, B.M., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Music 

Graduate, Georgia State Woman's College; B.M. and Violin Diploma, 
Ithaca Conservatory of Music; Student of Cesar Thompson— Belgian 
virtuoso, W. Grant Egbert, and Jean Pulikowski of the Cincinnati Con- 
servatory; M.A., Columbia University. 

Elizabeth A. Clark, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Religion 

A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Mildred Anne Droste, B.S., M.Ed. 
Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

B.S., Longwood College; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of 

North Carolina. 

Jean Slater Edson, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Music and Physics 

A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Columbia University. Study under Karl 
Walter, Vienna; Werner Dommes, Munich; Jean Langlais, Paris; A. A. G.O. - 
CH.M., American Guild of Organists. 

Donald Ellsworth Glover, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 



DIRECTORY 



*Miriam Jean Greenberg, B.S., M.Ed. 

Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
B.S., M.Ed., University of Maryland. 

Anna Mae Harris, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.A., University of Virginia. 

Margaret Meader Hofmann, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Wellesley College; M.A., University of New Hampshire; Ph.D. 

University of Kansas. 

Levin Houston, III, B.A. 

Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Virginia Military Institue; Pupil of Ray Lev, Thorvald Otterstrom, 

Hans Barth, Guy Maier, Quincy Cole, and Harold Genther; Composition 

at the Music Institute under Roger Sessions and Ernest Krenek. 
Michael Houston, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College; M.A., American University. 
Rose Mary Johnson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Biology 

A.B., Hood College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Thomas Lee Johnson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. ]2L 

Associate Professor of Biology DIRECTORY 

B.A., Lynchburg College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Edwin Harvie Jones, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney College; Diplome Superieur d' Etudes Francaises, 

University of Nancy, France; M.A., Duke University; Ph.D., University 

of Virginia. 
Mary Annette Klinesmith Kelly, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.A., Ohio State University; Fulbright 

Scholar, University of London Institute of Psychiatry. 

Bernard L. Mahoney, Jr. , B.S. , M.S. , Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire. 

Albert Ray Merchent, B.A., M.Ed., D.Ed. 
Associate Prof essor of Education 

B.A., Emory and Henry College; M.Ed., D.Ed., University of Virginia. 
Fred Earle Miller, A.B., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Economics 

A.B., M.A., Colorado State College of Education. 



*On leave- 1968-69 




194 



DIRECTORY 



, Yale University; Ph.D., Catholic Uni- 

Ph.D. 

A.M., University of Chicago; Ph.D., 



University of Virginia. 



Nancy Heyroth Mitchell, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Swarthmore College; M.A. 

versity of America. 

Paul C. Muick, B.F.A., A.M., 
Associate Professor of Art 

B.F.A., Ohio State University; 

Ohio State University. 

Mary Jo Parrish, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D. 
Galo Rene Perez, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Mejia National College; M.A. , Ph.D., Central University of Ecuador. 
Rebecca T. Woosley, A.B., B.S., M.S. 
Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; B.S., Mary 

Washington College; M.S., Louisiana State University. 

Benjamin F. Zimdars, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of History 

B.A., North Central College; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 

University of Texas. 



******** 



Assistant Professors 

Zoltan A. Antony, Th.D. 

Assistant Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

University of Bratislava, University of Leipzig; Th.D., University of 
Erlangen. 

Bulent I. Atalay, B.S., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., M.S., Georgetown University. 
James E. Baker, B.S., M.Ed. 
Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University. 
Joel H. Bernstein, B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., Washington and Lee University; M.A., University of Wyoming. 
Roger J. Bourdon, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of History 

B.S., Loyola University, M.A.; University of California at Los Angeles; 

Ph.D., University of Los Angeles. 



Marshall E. Bowen, B.Ed., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.Ed., Plymouth Teachers College; M.A., Kent State University. 

Harry L. Chipman, Jr., B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.S., M.S., Purdue University. 

Burton Cooper, B.A., Th.D. 

Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Columbia College; Th.D., Union Theological Seminary. 

Lucile Cox, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Classics 

A.B., Sweet Briar College; M.A., University of Virginia; Roman Civiliza- 
tion Certificate, American Academy in Rome, Italy; Greek Civilization. 

Judith A. Crissman, B.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Thiel College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Martha Gene Darby, B.A. , M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

B.A., Butler University; M.A., New York University. 
Albert G. Duke, A.B., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Dramatic Arts and Speech 

A.B., M.A., Syracuse University. 



Victor A. Fingerhut, B.A. , M.A. DIRECTORY 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Political Science 

B.A., M.A., Yale University. 
Dana G. Finnegan, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., Columbia University; M.A., Stanford University; Ph.D., University of 
Missouri. 

Alice Fischer, B.S., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Art 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University. 
Delmont F. Fleming, B.A., M.A. , Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Eastern Baptist College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Ruth T. Friedman , B.S. , Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Ph.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

John Kirk George, A.B., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Columbia College; M.S., University of Connecticut. 




196 



♦Anne F. Hamer, B.Mus., M.Mus. 

Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus., University of Michigan; M.Mus., Catholic University, Piano 
study under McClanahan, New York City, and Joseph Brinkman, Ann 
Arbor, Michigan. Cello study with Hans Pick, Ann Arbor, Howard 
Mitchell, Washington, D.C., and Joseph Schuster, New York City. 

Susan J. Hanna,B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Ohio State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Ruby C. Harris, B.S., M.Ed. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Mary Washington College; M.Ed., University of Virginia. 

Emily Martha Haymes, A.B., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
A.B., Drury College; M.S., Florida State University. 

Anne Fortune Henderson, B.S., M.Ed. 

Assistant Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
B.S., Richmond Professional Institute; M.Ed., University of Virginia. 

Mathew Herban, III, B.A. , A.M. 
Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., American University; A.M., Boston University. 

Rosemary H. Herman, A.B., M.A. 

DIRECTORY Assistant Prof essor of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., 
University of North Carolina. 

Joseph E. Holmes, B.S., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., M.S., State University of New York at New Paltz. 
Catherine Howell Hook, B.S., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Madison College; M.S., University of Virginia. 

Mildred Cates Jamison, B.S., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., East Tennessee State College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 
Robert B. Jessen, A.B. 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Union College. 

Lafayette Jackson Jones, B.S., M.A.T. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.A.T., Duke University. 



*On leave 1968-69 



Bernard N. Klenke, B.S. 
Assistant Professor of History 

B.S., Georgetown University; Adenauer Fellowship, Federal Republic of 

Western Germany. 

Bennett E. Koffman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Northwestern University; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 
University of Virginia. 

Bernard C. Lemoine, B.M., M.M. 
Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., Oberlin Conservatory of Music; M.M., University of Illinois School 

of Music. 
John C. Manolis, B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Assumption University; M.A., Florida State University. 
Cynthia M. Mavrides, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Assistant Prof essor of Psychology 

B.S., Washington State University; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Alexander Nakoi, B.A.(religion), B.A. (German), M.A. , Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A. (religion), University of Munich; B.A. (German), University of 

Vienna; M.A., Ph.D., University of Vienna. 797 

Cornelia Davidson Oliver, B.A. , A.M. 
Assistant Professor of Art LlllvbL, 1 UK Y 

B.A., Smith College; A.M., Duke University. 
Patricia Joan Patton, B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of Denver; M.A., University of Colorado. 
Mary Kaye Phifer, B.S., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Belmont College; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 
Patricia J. Pierce, B.A., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Colorado; M.S., Oregon State University. 

*Mary Warren Pinschmidt, A.B., A.M. 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

A.B., Western Maryland College; A.M., Duke University. 
Key Sun Ryang, B.A., M. A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Trinity University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Richard L. Sarchet, B.S., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Southwestern State College, Oklahoma; M.S., Oklahoma State 

University. 



Robert Miller Saunders, B. A. , M. A. , Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., University of Richmond; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Dudley A. Sherwood, B.S., B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Classics 

B.S., Purdue University; B.A., M.A., University of Toronto. 
Paul C. Slayton, Jr., B.S., M.Ed., D.Ed. 
Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., M.Ed., D.Ed., University of Virginia. 
Peter V. Snyder, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor Philosophy 

B.A., M.A., Bowling Green University; Ph.D., (four college cooperative 

program)— Amherst, Mt. Holyoke, Smith, and the University of 

Massachusetts. 

Glen Ray Thomas, B.A. , M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Stanford University; M.A., American University. 
JoaoClaudio Todorov, B.S., Ph.D. 
Assistant Prof essor of Psychology 

B'.S., University of Sao Paulo, Brazil; Ph.D., ArizonaState University. 
Thomas S. Turgeon, B.A. , D.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Dramatic Arts and Speech 

nTRFPTORY B.A., Amherst College; D.F.A. , Yale University. 

Richard Crist Turner, Jr., S.B., S.M. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

S.B., S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Richard Hyde Warner, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of History 

A. B., Dartmouth College; M.A., Ph.D., New York University. 
Roy B. Weinstock, B.A., M. A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Hollins College; Ph.D., Syracuse Uni- 
versity. 
♦Richard M. Zeleznock, B.S., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., California State College; M.A., Rutgers University. 
********** 

*On leave 1968-69 



198 




Instructors 

Michael L. Bass, A.A., B.S., M.S. 

Instructor in Biology 

A. A., Clinch Valley College; B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S. 

Medical College of Virginia. 
Otho C. Campbell, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in History 

B.A., Richmond College; M.A., The American University. 
Anne B. Capelle 
Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

Licence d' Anglais, University of Caen. 
Jeanne DeLay Chalifoux 
Instructor in Music 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music. 

SOLANGE T. CHETAI 

Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

Baccalaureate, College Classique; Licence, University of Paris. 




Gene Chu, A. A., M.F.A. 

Instructor in Art 

A. A., Ontario College of Art; M.F.A. , Claremont Graduate School. 
Recipient of A. Vaughan Scholarship; Clark-Stone Scholarship; George 
B. Bridgman Merial Scholarship; Government of France Medal in Painting. 

Madeline Cohen, B.A. , M.A. 
Instructor in Art 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

Clotilde Dagnino, B.A., M.A., I.S.I.D.A. 

Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Ancelle College, Palermo; M.A., University of Palermo. 

Daniel A. Dervin, B.S., M.A. 

Instructor in English 

B.S., Creighton University; M.A., Columbia University. 

Sonja Dragomanovic 

Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

Professional Dance Certificate, Zagreb State Opera Ballet School, Yogosla- 
via; diploma (dance and choreography), Meister Staten Fur Tranz, Berlin, 
Germany; study at Mozarteum Conservatory of Music, Salzburg, Austria. 

John Druzbick, B.S. 
Instructor in Physics 
B.S., Roanoke College. 

Margaret Sue Early, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in English 

B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Duke University. 



199 



DIRECTORY 



Peter A. Fellowes, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in English 

B. A., Colgate University; M.A., Johns Hopkins University. 

Janet M. Gardner, B.S., M.A. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., St. Francis College; M.A., Duquesne University. 

Joyce Wheeler Gardner, B.S. 

Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., Juilliard School of Music; student: Jacob's Pillow University of the 
Dance, Columbia University; Advanced study: University of Wisconsin, 
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 

Richard E. Hansen, B.A., A.M. 
Instructor in English 

B.A., A.M., Duke University. 

Mary Jane Hyde, A. A., B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
A. A., Christian College; B.A., M.A., University of Kentucky. 

John P. Johnson, B.S. 
Instructor in Art 
200 B.S., Virginia State College. 

Constance Anne Jones, B.A., M.A.T. 
Instructor in Sociology 

B.A., M.A.T., Vanderbilt University. 
Carol Ann Kemmler, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., University of Rhode Island. 
Harold Anton Michael Kirschner 
Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

Graduate of Officers' Training School, Copenhagen, Denmark. 
Linda Rae Ladner, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., City University of New York; M.S., University of Illinois. 
Joanna M. Looney, A.B., M.A. 
Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Wesleyan College; M.A., Duke University. 
Carlton R. Lutterbie, Jr., B.S., M.A. 
Instructor in English 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.A., University of Chicago. 
♦Judith Lee Nixon, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., Auburn University; M.S., West Virginia University. 

*On leave 1968-69 



DIRECTORY 



Roberta A. Rankin, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in English 

B.A., M.A., University of Florida. 
Yvonne M. Sabine, B.A. 
Instructor in Music 

B.A., American University. 

ASTRID SCHNELLER, B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., University of North Carolina. 
Jaime Sendra, B.S. 
Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

B.S., University of Richmond. 
Raman K. Singh, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in English 

B.A., St. Stephen's College; M.A., Western Michigan University. 
Arthur L. Tracy, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in History 

B.A., Barrington College, M.A., The American University. 
Alexander Kelly Tyree, B.S., M.A.T. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., U.S. Naval Academy; M.A.T. , Duke University. 
Martha E. Van Zandt, B. A., M.M. 



Instructor in Music DIRECTORY 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.M., University of Michigan. 

Janet M. Whisler, B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Iowa. 
Susan K. White, B.S., M.Ed. 
Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., Springfield College, M.Ed., West Chester State College. 
Richard T. Wilfong, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Biology 

B.S., College of William and Mary; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 



****** 



*On leave of absence- 1968-69. 



Assistant Instructors 

Martha Jones Burke, B.S. 
Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 
Nancy Cole Dosch, B.S. 
Assistant Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., University of Maryland. 
Lydie S. Mann 
Assistant Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

Baccalaureat, Lycee Georgesville, Paris; diploma, Institut de Phonetique, 

University of Paris. 

Joan Rivera Robbins, B.S. 

Assistant Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 
B.S., Radford College. 



Visiting Lecturers 



202 



DIRECTORY 



TeruoHara, B.A. , M.A. 
Visiting Artist 

B.A., M.A,, Tokyo Kyoiko University, Japan. 

Renee V. Singh, B.S., M.A. (geography), M.A. (education) 
Visiting Lecturer in Geography 

B.S., Lucknow University; M.A. (geography), Allahabad University; 

M.A. (education), George Peabody College. 

Murat Willis Williams, B.A., B.A. (Oxon.) , M.A. (Oxon.) 
Visiting Lecturer in Political Economy 

B.A., University of Virginia; B.A., M.A., Oxford University. 




Committees of the Faculty 

Group 1: Area of Academic Policies and Procedures 

Academic Counselling and Guidance-Miss Stephenson (Chair- 
man), Mr. Manolis (Secretary), Mrs. Black, Mrs. Dodd, Mrs. 
Luntz, Mr. Zimdars. Ex Officio: The Associate Dean, the Assistant 
Dean of Students. 

Curriculum/ Mrs. Sumner (Chairman), Mr. Duke (Secretary), 
Mr. Emory, Mr. Luntz, Mr. Muick, Mr. Sherwood, Mr. Slayton, 
Mr. Thomas, Miss Woosley. Ex Officio: The Dean, the Associate 
Dean. 

Instruction and Academic Affairs/ Mr. Wishner (Chairman), Miss 
Hoye (Secretary), Mr. Allen, Miss Finnegan, Miss Greene, Mr. 
Saunders. Ex Officio: The Dean. 

Faculty Organization and Procedures/ Mr. Miller (Chairman), 
Mrs. Hoge (Secretary), Mr. Bird, Mr. Bulley, Mrs. Kash, Mr. 
Miller, Miss Parrish. 

Faculty General Cooperative/ Mr. Zimdars (Chairman), Mr. 203 

L. Jones (Secretary), Miss Benton, Mr. Glover, Mr. Sherwood, DTRFCTORY 

Mr. Vance. 

Group II: Area of Administrative Responsibility for Specific 
Aspects of the College Program. 

Admissions and Admissions Policy/ Director of Admissions (Chair- 
man), Mr. Baker, Mrs. Hofmann, Miss King. Ex Officio: 
Dean, Associate Dean, Dean of Students, Director of Admissions, 
Registrar. 

Joint Council/ Mr. Klein (Chairman), Mr. L. C. Carter, Mrs. 
Pierce. Student Members: Terrell L. Pinkard (Campus Chairman), 
Barbara Greenlief, Pamela Hudson, Gloria Shelton, LynnVander- 
voort. Non-voting SGA President, Patricia M. Boise. 

Library/ Miss Johnson (Chairman), Mrs. Cosner (Secretary), 
Miss Arnold, Mrs. Blessing, Mr. Brown, Mr. Chipman. Ex 
Officio: Librarian. 




204 



DIRECTORY 



Public Occasions/ Mr. Kenvin (Chairman) , Mr. Kelly (Secretary), 
Mr. Early, Mr. L. Houston, Mr. Lemoine, Mr. Lindsey, Miss 
Rivera, Mr. Singh. Ex Officio: Dean, Dean of Students, Assistant 
Dean of Students (Director of Student Affairs), Director of In- 
formation Services. Student Members: Miss Maura Pettit, Sopho- 
more Representative; Miss Marilyn Preble, Junior Representative; 
Miss Betty Earles, Senior Representative. Ex Officio Student 
Members: President of S. G. A.; Inter- Club President: Head 
Usher; Chairman, Cultural Affairs Committee. 



Summer School/ Mr. Fickett, Mr. Insley, Mr. Sarchet. Ex Officio 
Members: Director of the Summer Session; Associate Dean; 
Director of Student Affairs; Librarian-elect. Two members from 
Summer Faculty: Miss Benton, Mr. Turgeon. 

Student members: Elizabeth S. Moore, Kathryn E. Thiel. 

Committee on College Affairs/ Administration: Miss Hargrove, 
Mr. Whidden, Mr. Woodward; Faculty: Mrs. Mitchell (Chairman), 
Mr. Ataley, Mr. Castle; Students: Marilyn Morgan (Secretary), 
Linda Marett, Lucia Smithey. 

Group III: Special Academic Committees 



Rare Books Committee-Dr. Gordon Jones (Chairman), Mr. 
Wishner (Secretary), Mr. Binford, Mrs. Edson, Mr. Mitchell. 
Ex Officio: Librarian. 




Group IV: Special Assignments 

Adviser to The Bullet/ Mr. Mann 

Adviser to The Battlefield/ 'Mr. Mann 

Adviser to The Epaulet/ 'Mr. Fellowes 

Financial Adviser to all S.G. A. Appropriations/ 'Mrs. Holloway 

Secretary to the Faculty/ 'Mr. Merchent 

Marshal of the Faculty/ Mr. Van Sant 



205 



DIRECTORY 



GroupV: Special Committees 

Faculty Handbook (ad hoc)/ Miss Parrish (Chairman), Mr. Flem- 
ing (Secretary), Mr. Allison, Mr. Alvey, Miss Herman, Mr. 
Insley. 

Future of the College (ad hoc)-Mrs. Boiling (Chairman), Mr. 
Klein (Secretary), Mr. Allison, Miss Droste, Mr. Fingerhut, 
Mr. M. Houston, Mrs. Kelly, Mr. Leidecker, Mr. Mahoney, 
Mr. Mitchell. 



Dean's Committees (ad hoc) 

Asian Studies/ Mr. Leidecker (Chairman), Mr. Croushore, 
Mr. Kenvin, Mr. Ryang. 

Latin American Studies/ Miss Stephenson (Chairman), Mr. 
Emory, Mr. Koffman, Mr. Perez, Mr. Zimdars. Student representa- 
tive, Marilyn Preble. 

Slavic Studies/ Mr. Bozicevic (Chairman), Mr. Bowen, Mr. 
Fickett, Mr. Warner. Student representative, Alexandra Toma- 
lonis. 



Alumnae Association 

Mary Washington College has a large and active Alumnae 
Association with members living in all parts of the United States 
and in foreign countries. Any graduate of the College or any 
student who has been regularly registered at the College for a 
minimum of two semesters is a member of the Association. 
Many of the alumnae have achieved distinction in the fields 
of art, music, literature, business, social work, education, and 
politics. 

The primary goal of the Association is to assist the College 
in the development and expansion of its institutional program and 
facilities, and to promote the educational philosophy of the 
College. The Association aims also to develop and strengthen the 
bonds of interest existing between the College and its alumnae 
and among the alumnae themselves. 

The Alumnae House, "Spotswood," is across College Avenue 
from the western gates to the campus. 

Officers 

Kathy Friedman Levinson '63 Chairman of the Board 

{Mrs. Stuart A.) 

DIRECTORY 803 Hepler Road, Richmond, Virginia 23229 

Isabel Gordon '42 First Vice Chairman 

1208 Thornton Street, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 

Joanne Insley Pearre '57 Second Vice Chairman 

(Mrs. A. A. Jr.) 

Old Braddock, Rt. 5, Frederick, Maryland 21710 

Bonnie Davis Hall '60 Third Vice Chairman 

(Mrs. Ross D.) 
396 Quinby Road, Rochester, New York 14623 

Mary Ellen Stephenson Faculty Representative 

Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 
Box 1238, College Station, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 

Anne L. Perinchief '67 Director of Alumnae Affairs 

Box 1315, College Station, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 

Mr. Michael Houston Liaison for Alumnae Affairs 

Assistant to the Chancellor 
Box 3575, College Station, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 



206 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

June, 1968 
Bachelor of Arts 

With Honors in Dramatic Arts and Speech 

Mary Elizabeth James Charlottesville, Va. 

Lynn Marie Shelby West Islip, N. Y. 

With Honors in English 
Nancy Lynn Ayres Springfield, Va. 

With Honors in Latin 
Barbara Jean Price Richmond , Va. 

With Honors in Political Science 
Barbara Ann Bailey Palmyra, Pa. 

Lucinda Parshall Long Salisbury, Md. 

With Honors in Psychology 
Louise Wrenshall Steinmark Pittsburgh, Pa. 

With Honors in Spanish 
Judith Ann Kurfehs Fredericksburg, Va. 



Bachelor of Arts 



207 



DIRECTORY 



Ellen Ann Adkinson 
Marjorie Elaine Arnsdorff 
Mary Ellen Ashelford 
Christina Elizabeth Askounis 
Elizabeth Nelson Atthowe 
Mary Ann Austin 
Roberta Ellen Bachrach 
Lynda Lee Badran 
Martha Elizabeth Bailey 
Susan Carol Ballard 
Carole Ann Baman 
Margarett Beth Barber 
Grace Anne Barrett 
Patricia Rita Barrett 
Marie France Elizabeth Bast 
Caroline Holt Batte 
Barbara Ann Baxter 
Barbara Dua Beavers 
Lynn Belcher 
Nancy Marie Bell 
Eugenia Mary Benetatos 



Somerset, N. J. 
Fort Myers, Fla. 
Orange, Conn. 
Langley Air Force Base, Va. 
Lexington, Va. 
Bluefield, West Va. 
Springfield, N.J. 
Norfolk, Va.' 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Stuttgart, Germany 
Huntington Station, N.Y. 
Richmond, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
McKenney, Va. 
Shaker Height, O. 
Rumson, N. J. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Falmouth, Va. 



208 



DIRECTORY 



Barbara Clare Bennett 
Carol Jean Bergstedt 
Suzanna Elizabeth Bibb 
Mary Beth Bingman 
Rebecca Sue Blankenship 
Susan Kay Blosser 
Ann Holladay Boatright 
Carolyn Lee Bogan 
Marian Christine Bonds 
Connie L. Hames Books 
Margaret Ann Booth 
Phylis Ruth Botchin 
Marjorie Susan Bottimore 
Elizabeth Josephine Bowden 
Judith Ann Bowker 
Suzanne Marie Bowlin 
Lelea Kay Bowling 
Helen Patricia Bradford 
Amelia Jane Bradley 
Cecilia Rae Brim 
Dorothy Ann Brundage 
Kathy Jeanne Bruneske 
Janice Marie Bryant 
Ann Elizabeth Buckner 
Susan Eleanore Burho 
Sharon Lloyd Burke 
Cynthia Ardis Burnham 
Nancy Lou Burrow 
Marianne Cadle 
Teresa Ann Caell 
Margaret Victoria Calamos 
Ann Fairbairn Campbell 
Donna Gail Caple 
Georgia Ellen Carroll 
Linda Hall Charnock 
Margaret Ann Chastek 
Faithe Cho 
Susan Garth Clarke 
Rebekah Watkins Clary 
Elizabeth Rives Coates 
Susan Gail Conover 
Nancy Motley Cook 
Amelia Clara Cooper 
Dorothy Jean Cooper 



Clark, N. J. 
Clark, N.J. 
Richmond, Va. 
Wise, Va. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Newport News, Va. 
Staunton, Va. 
Garden City, N. Y. 
Stafford, Va. 
Piney River, Va. 
Frankfurt, Germany 
Norfolk, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Torrejon, Spain 
Bel Alton, Md. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Bethesda, Md. 
Great Falls, Va. 
Cascade, Md. 
Williamsburg, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Suitland, Md. 
Richmond, Va. 
Landover Hills, Md. 

Kinnelon, N.J. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Trenton, N. J. 
Richmond, Va. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Heidleburg, Germany 
Barboursville, Va. 
Lawrenceville, Va. 
Tazewell, Va. 
Hightstown, N.J. 
Danville, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 



Beverly Sue Cox 
Carol Thayer Cox 
Angela Mary Cummings 
Dianne Christine Dale 
Betty Coffey Dameron 
Janet Lillian Blanche Davis 
Jo Helen Adams Davis 
Marion Alice Davis 
Julia Allen Deane 
Deborah Lee Derr 
Marion Tileston Dietz 
Betty Blair Dobbins 
Fredericka Victoria Doggett 
Kathryn Mary Duffy 
Mary Gardner Edmonds 
Nancy Ellen Eicholtz 
Susan Denning Farnham 
Betty Kay Feamster 
Sandra Dennis Fellowes 
Rhoda Marian Fisher 
Shirley Jayne Fix 
Sandra Jeanie Flint 
Karen Medred Follman 
Patricia Lea Francisco 
Karen Anne Frasier 
Joan Frederick 
Jacqueline Marie French 
Frances Suzanne Fuqua 
Anne Fitzhugh Gallagher 
Elly Samm Gellens 
Beverley Anne Gilliam 
Barbara Sweeney Gillis 
Danielle Giraud 
Dorothy Wallace Glading 
Alice Elizabeth Goldsmith 
Elizabeth Morgan Goliad ay 
Patricia Anne Grant 
Rochelle Grey 
Ann Gallahan Grimes 
Cheryl Jeanne Grissom 
Deborah Ann Gundlach 
Barbara Jeanne Hague 
Lorelei Haig 



Alexandria, Va. 
Belmar, N. J. 
Arlington, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Prince George, Va. 
Newport News, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Ardmore, Pa. 
Alexandria. Va. 
Key Biscayne, Fla. 
Louisa, Va. 
Mechanicsville, Va. 
Piscataway Township, N. J. 
Huntly, Va. 
Elk Grove Village, 111. 
Manlius, N. Y. 
Newport News, Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cranford, N. J. 
Lexington, Va. 
Cohasset, Mass. 
Hampton, Va. 
Pikeville, Ky. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Cleveland, O. 
McLean, Va. 
Baton Rouge, La. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Pennington, N. J. 
Hopewell, Va. 
Johnstown. Pa. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Vienna, Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Stephens City, Va. 
Chester, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 

Boston, Mass. 

Richmond, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 



209 



DIRECTORY 



210 



DIRECTORY 



Elissa Anne Hammack 

Diane Carver Hammond 

Sharon Ann Harding 

Reba Ann Harnage 

Donna Clinton Harrison 

Jane Hey Harrison 

Madeleine Hart 

Laura Ellen Hartenberger 

Elizabeth Jean Haskins 

Judith Ellen Heartwell 

Judith Ann Henley 

Diane E. Deaderick Hildebran 

Judith Odell Hirschbiel 

Bari Anne Holden 
Terry Gail Hutto 
Teresa Ison 

Caroline Ruth Jackson 
Judith Carolyn Jackson 
Nancy Halliday Jackson 
Laura Jean H. James 
Barbara Elaine Jarrett 
Lynnea Jean Johnson 
Sue Johnson 
Ann Susan Jones 
Donna Carol Jones 
Sandra Marie Joyner 
Cheryl Kay Kaetzel 
Bonnie Vourneen Kelley 
Virginia K. Klipa 
Bettie Kornegay 
Kyra Buckingham Krombein 
Kristina Wood Krstulich 
Kathryn Jane LaCas 
Dina Sample Lane 
Leslie Jean Lentz 
Susan Kay Lewis 
Patricia Jones Lingle 
Margaret Overton Livesay 
Margaret Anne Livingston 
Susan Eleanor Logan 
Helen Sullivan Lovelace 
Sara Belinda Lowenhaupt 
Karen Sue Lubash 
Sally Guy Lynch 



Richmond, Va. 

Basking Ridge, N. J. 

Chevy Chase, Md. 

Falls Church, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Jacksonville, Ala. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 
Hanover, N. J. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Pound, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Newington, Conn. 
Eastville, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Limerick, Pa. 
Alexandria, Va. 

Canandaigua, N.Y. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Annandale, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
McLean, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Highland Falls, N. Y. 
Staunton, Va. 
Tappahannock, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Monterey, Calif. 
Bridgewater, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Springfield, Va. 
Levittown, Pa. 
Richmond, Va. 



Svetlana A. McCabe 
Roberta Maurene McCartney 
Barbara Nell McLaughlin 
Nelle Hill McLaughlin 
Patricia Ann MacPhee 
Martha Ann Maddox 
Mary Margaret Marston 
Beverly Jean Martin 
Marcia Ann Martin 
Marvella Sue Martin 
Margaret Ann Massmann 
Marie Frederica Matthews 
Trina Ann Mazaitis 
M. Lynn Middaugh 
Margaret Bennett Miller 
Sally Carlson Monroe 
Carolyn Elizabeth Monti 
Sandra Jean Moore 
Pamela Ann Moreland 
Jeanne Ann Morgan 
Susan Childs Morris 
Gail Jargowsky Morrison 
Exa Marie Mote 
Kathleen Sheely Mouzakis 
Sally Ann Moyer 
Sheila Louise Muddiman 
Jo Anne Mudloff 
Carol Hudson Muldoon 
Sarah Pierpont Nabstedt 
Mary Ellen Wittig Neale 
Carol Elizabeth O'Connor 
Rosemary O'Donohue 
Carolyn Ann Oliver 
Kathy Ann Ormond 
Betty L. Orr 
Patricia Ann Padget 
Tanya Louise Pagin 
Cynthia Ann Paradise 
Paula Lyn Parker 
Isabel Christian Parrish 
Donna Sue Paschall 
Dorothy Helaine Patterson 
Roselle Lynn Perri 
Suzanne Perri 



Mattapoisett, Mass. 
Arlington, Va. 
McLean, Va. 
Lexington, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Vienna, Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Springfield, Va. 
Allentown, Pa. 
Newport News, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Springfield, Va. 
San Diego, Calif. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Annandale, Va. 
Annandale, Va. 
Rockville Centre, N. Y. 
Cranford,N. J. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Silver Spring, Md. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Port Allegany, Pa. 
Great Falls, Va. 
Warrenton, Va. 
West Point, Ga. 
Mt. Carmel, Conn. 
Portsmouth, Va. 
West Point, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Dahlgren, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Jonesville, Va. 
Naples, Italy 
Falls Church, Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Richmond , Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Sea Girt, N. J. 
Waynesboro, Va. 
Waynesboro, Va. 



211 



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212 



DIRECTORY 



Janet Catherine Perry 

Kristin Peterson 

Marilee Dorothy Petri 

Sandra Lee Phelps 

Anita Lynd Pidcock 

Charlene McCormick Plunkett 

Esther Ely Pollok 

Nancy Carol Porter 

Carol Eileen Potter 

Edith Anne Potts 

Brenda Ann Quick 

Sandra Lee Radford 

Antoinette Lee Radler 

April Ramey 

Patricia Dale Rea 

Iris Aurora Reapsome 

Susan Janice Reed 

Jane Frances Walenta Rehl 

Susan Lizabethe Rhoades 

Linda Kathryn Rice 

Katharine Carlton Ridge 

Jean High Roach 

Janet Lenora Roark 

Nancy Jeanne Robb 

Sheila Kaye Fix Roberson 

Jean May Robertson 

Frances Eileen Rodgers 

Carolyn Greenwood Rohr 

Hazel Dee Rothfeld 

Carol Jean Rowe 

Lynn Mary Ruby 

Barbette Sue Runckel 

Leslie Russell 

Dale Christina Saunders 

Frances Marie Scavullo 

Kathy Lou Schneider 

Mary Katherine Schneider 

Anna Elizabeth Louise Schwarzer 

Elizabeth Scott 

Susan Anne Sears 

Susan Kelly Senechal 

Donna Gay Sheehan 

Charlotte Jean Shelton 



McLean, Va. 
Simsbury, Conn. 
Highland Springs, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Waynesboro, Va. 
Waynesboro, Va. 
Dry Fork, Va. 
Galax, Va. 
Reading, Pa. 
Williamsburg, Va. 
Weyers Cave, Va. 
Aiken, S. C. 
Ashland, Va. 
Centralia, 111. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Big Run, Pa. 
Washington, D. C. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Mountain Lakes, N. J. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Richmond, Va. 
Nathalie, Va. 
Annandale, Va. 
Lexington, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Westlake, O. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Rockville Centre, N. Y. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Cleveland Heights, O. 
Newport News, Va. 
Vienna, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Ventnor, N. J. 
Wolfeboro, N. H. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Cazenovia, N. Y. 
East Greenwich, R. I. 
Annandale, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 



Kathryn Lynn Shelton 
Meta Murray Shepherd 
Lelia Jane Shields 
Sylvia Jean Shipe 
Carol Amy Simmons 
Madeline Lankford Simmons 
Sharon Ann Simpson 
Suzanne Meredith Smith 
Beatrice Timmins Smolka 
Brenda Kay Sprouse 
Diana Iris Stamer 
Maveret Eleanor Staples 
Susan Jane Stein 
Barbara Ann Stevenson 
Betty Poole Stevick 
Judith Ann Stickley 
Beatrice Ann Stith 
Julie Ann Storz 
Jamie Ann Stuart 
Jane Carter Stubbs 
Brenda Lee Swanson 
Alyce Ann Talley 
Mary Josephine Tatum 
Pamela M. Tompkins 
Anne Tooke 
Pamela Nissly Toppin 
Melodye Lee Traupel 
Nancy Meredith Tucker 
Cynthia Marie Twark 
Catherine Walworth Tyng 
Mary Kathryn Van Lear 
Elizabeth M. Volkart 
Susan Ann Wagner 
Laurie Ann Walters 
Sheila Wands 
Jenifer Antonia Ward 
Brenda Overton Watkins 
Mary Lee Westcott 
Marilyn Parris Wheeler 
Cherrylea Henderson White 
Constance Anne White 
Rosemary Elizabeth Whitley 
Karen Williams Whitt 



Chatham, Va. 
Harwood, Md. 
Chatham, Va. 
Petersburg, Va. 
Pittsford, N. Y. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Springfield, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Clinton, Md. 
Arlington, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Pleasantville, N. Y. 
Arlington, Va. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Middletown, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Cranford,N. J. 
Camden, S. C. 
Lexington, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Gibsonia, Pa. 
Mount Joy, Pa. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Bedford, Va. 
Palmyra, Va. 
Clifton Forge, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Jacksonville, N. C. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Vienna, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Wallingford,Pa. 
West Point, Ga. 
Chesapeake, Va. 
Trenton, N. J. 
Norfolk, Va. 



213 



DIRECTORY 



Martha Carol Widener 
M. Patricia Wigglesworth 
Cary Leigh Williams 
Elizabeth deShazo Willis 
Virginia Louise Wills 
Jane Alexander Wilson 
Frances Gloria Wishner 
Elizabeth Sara Witmer 
Sandra Lee Wolfe 
Star Meroney Wolven 
Carolyn Jane Wood 
Leneice N. Wu 
Linda Rae Young 
Barbara Laurie Zieses 



Falls Church, Va. 
Chevy Chase, Md. 
Richmond, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Hanover, Pa. 
Brightwood, Va. 
Newport News, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 



Ann Cecilia Scott 



Bachelor of Science 

With Honors in Chemistry 

Richmond, Va. 



214 



Bachelor of Science 



DIRECTORY 



Betty Josephine Berrey 
Susan Garrington Bright 
Nancy Christene Brown 
Sherry Rose Brown 
Susan Majors Brown 
Susan VanMarter Chadwick 
Linda Lee Clement 
Elizabeth Ann Cox 
Eileen Elizabeth Curley 
Anne Nichol Dean 
Patricia Anne Dickson 
Kerry Lynn Duer 
Linda Irene Hall 
Donna Jean Harding 
Barbara Frances Hardy 
Margaret Suzanne Harvey 
Roberta Lee Head 
Margaret Murry Holland 
Jo Ann Izenour 
Susan Marvin Jacob 
Venus R. Jones 



Ruckersville, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Manasquan, N. J. 
Arlington, Va. 
West Point, N. Y. 
Vienna, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Allentown, Pa. 
Criglersville, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Belle Haven, Va. 
Oxford, Conn. 
Richmond, Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Mechanicsville, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Ellicott City, Md. 
Petersburg, Va. 



Phyllis Anne Schreck Krause 
Barbara Jane Laine 
Donna Leigh Lamberth 
Mary Margaret Lawson 
Sharon Louise Maddrea 
Jean Dearen Mann 
Claire Dudley Marchant 
Jill Patrice Marvel 
L. Vliet Matthews 
Anne Preston Middleton 
Maureen Frances Murphy 
Sallie Elizabeth Myatt 
Kathleen Nagy 
Jeanette McMullan Popovich 
Carolyn Elizabeth Ramsey 
Barbara Jean Ray 
Cecily Ann Riddell 
Linda Larkin Ritter 
Jill Graham Robinson 
Sandra Ann Robinson 
Janice Lynn Rogers 
Merrilyn Pearl Sawyer 
Janet Lynn Servies 
Dana Faye Sharpe 
Louise Marie Shick 
Sandra Lee Smith 
Mary Lou Soper 
Sheila Kaye Spivey 
Elizabeth Lawson Stillman 
Paula Frances Taylor 
Carol Ann Thomason 
Linda Mae Tucker 
Joanne Frances Turner 
Anne Burton Tweedy 
Celeste Holland Vellines 
Georgia Elaine Wahl 
Jane Elizabeth Wilfong 
Sibyl Gayle Woosley 
Celia Wyatt Worsham 



Alexandria, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
New Castle, Del. 
Annandale, Va. 
Towson, Md. 
Alexandria, Va. 
McLean, Va. 
Woodbridge, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Casanova, Va. 
Keswick, Va. 
McLean, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Silver Spring, Md. 
Yorktown, Va. 
Pensacola, Fla. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Fincastle, Va. 
Beaverdam, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Seaford, Va. 
Sutherlin, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Waynesboro, Va. 
Richmond', Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Dayton, Va. 
Brookneal, Va. 
Danville, Va. 



215 



DIRECTORY 



Bachelor of Science in Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation 

Thelma Adeline Bowen Warsaw, Va. 

Stephanie Theresa Danahy Fredericksburg, Va. 

Janice Ann McKay Fredericksburg, Va. 

Carolyn Ann Oliver Fort Ord, Calif. 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 

Judy {Catherine Boyce Chesapeake, Va. 

Beverley Ann Clare King George, Va. 

Jean Mary Eley Richmond, Va. 

Sarah Elizabeth Gaffney Shelby, N. C. 

Connie Jo Mason Joyce Fairfax, Va. 

Anne Douglas Kern Winchester, Va. 

Michele Berger McQuigg Sayville, N. Y. 

Margaret Anne Morton The Hague, Netherlands 

Ruth Swart Moulton Fairfax, Va. 

Mollie Fornes Peery Fredericksburg, Va. 
Dorothy Carolyn Marks Prosser Lexington, Va. 

216 Susan Elizabeth Schnettler Morristown, N. J. 



DIRECTORY 



Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 

Rosemary Jane Clifton Richmond, Va. 

Martha Elizabeth Cooper Winter Park, Fla. 

H. Lee Taylor Richmond, Va. 

Karen Adele Wells Florence, Ala. 

Betty Camille Woodard Suffolk, Va. 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS 
BY STATES AND COUNTRIES 

Session 1968-69 



Virginia 


1586 


California 


2 




Pennsylvania 


100 


Colorado 


2 




New Jersey 


97 


Hawaii 


2 




Maryland 


69 


Kentucky 


2 




New York 


59 


Rhode Island 


2 




Connecticut 


24 


Wisconsin 


2 




Massachusetts 


22 


Arizona 






Florida 


21 


District of Columbia 






Ohio 


13 


Kansas 






North Carolina 


11 


Minnesota 






West Virginia 


9 


Missouri 






Georgia 


8 


Nebraska 






Alabama 


7 


Oklahoma 






South Carolina 


7 


Washington 






Illinois 


5 


Wyoming 






Tennessee 


5 








Indiana 


4 


Canal Zone 




217 


Maine 


4 


England 


2 






Texas 


4 


Germany 




DIRECTORY 


Delaware 


3 


Hungary 






Louisiana 


3 


Puerto Rico 


2 




Michigan 


3 


Viet Nam 






Mississippi 


3 


Yugoslavia 






New Hampshire 


3 


2 


100 





Absences 62 

Academic Achievement, Recognition of 68 

Academic Buildings 12 

Academic Costume 35 

Academic Distinction 68 

Academic Information 57 

Academic Probation and Suspension 66 

Academic Regulations 60 

Academic Status of the College 8 

Accommodations and Buildings 12 

Admi nistrative Personnel 181 

Admissions 

Requirements 19 

Scholastic Preparation 19 

Examinations 19 

Character, Personality, and Interests 20 

Health 20 

Committee Review 21 

Advanced Placement and the College-Level Examination Programs 24 

Admission by Advanced Standing 

Admission Requirements 26 

Academic Preparation 26 

Residence Requirements 26 

Direction for Application 26 

Alpha Phi Sigma Award 69 

Alpha Psi Omega Scholarship 36 

Alumnae Association 206 

American Association of University Women 8 

American Studies— Departmental Course Offerings 97 

American Studies— Interdepartmental Major 78 

American Viscose Corporation Scholarship 38 

Amphitheatre 16 219 

Ann Carter Lee Hall (Student Activities Building) 15 

Anne Fairfax House 15 TMnrv 

Annie Fleming Smith Scholarship Fund 38 IJND.E/X 

Application Fee 33 

Application for Admission to the College 22 

Art— Departmental Course Offerings 98 

Art Exhibitions 48 

Asian Studies 79 

Assistance, Financial 36 

Astronomy— Departmental Course Offerings 105 

Attendance, Absences, Excuses, and Class Cuts 62 

Audiology and Speech Pathology, Cooperative Program in 91 

Awards 69 

Bachelor of Arts Degree, Requirements for 73 

Bachelor of Arts Degrees Conferred, June, 1968 207 

Bachelor of Science Degree, Requirements for 74 

Bachelor of Science Degrees Conferred, June, 1968 214 

Bachelor of Science in Health, Physical Education, and 

Recreation Degrees Conferred, June, 1968 216 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Degrees Conferred, 

June, 1968 216 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology Degree, Requirements 

for 74 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology Degrees Conferred, 

June, 1968 216 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy Degree, Requirements 

for 74 

Band and Orchestra Instruments— Course Offerings 164 

Band, Chorus, and String Ensemble 164 

Bank , Student 35 

Bayly-Tiffany Scholarships 36 

Belmont 15 

Biology— Departmental Course Offerings 105 

Biology Scholarships : 36 



Book And Supplies 35 

Bowley Scholarship Fund 37 

Brompton 15 

Buildings and Accommodations 12 

Buildings, Other 15 

Calendar 4 

Carol E. Casto Memorial Scholarship Fund , 37 

Chancellor's Alumnae Fund 37 

Chandler Hall 12 

Chandler Scholarship, The 37 

Change of Schedule or Courses 61 

Character, Personality, and Interests 20 

Chemistry— Departmental Course Offerings 108 

Chorus 164 

Class Attendance 62 

Class Cuts 62 

Classical Civilization— Course Offerings 112 

Classical Civilization— Interdepartmental Major 80 

Classics— D epartmental Course Offerings .110 

Classification as a Virginia Student 32 

Classification of Students 

Freshmen 60 

Sophomores 60 

Juniors 60 

Seniors 60 

Specials 60 

Clubs and Organizations 55 

Colgate W. Darden, Jr. Award 69 

College Scholarship Service 36 

College Theatre 53 

220 College YWCA 49 

Collegiate Professional Certificate 121 

INDEX Combs Science Hall 12 

Committees of the Faculty 203 

Concerts 48 

Contents, Table of 3 

Contingent Fee 31 

Cooperative Programs 

Cooperative Program in Elementary Education 91 

Cooperative Program in Elementary Education 91 

Cooperative Program in Medical Technology 84 

Cooperative Program in Nursing 88 

Cooperative Program in Speech Pathology and Audiology 91 

Cooperative Programs in Physical Therapy 86 

Corporation of the U niversity , The 1 80 

Counselling and Guidance 51 

Counselling Center 52 

Course (Defined) 60 

Course Numbers and Credits 97 

Course Offerings 95 

Courses, Elective 75 

Credit 35 

Dance— Course Offerings 139 

Dances 48 

Dean' s List, The 68 

Deficiencies 64 

Degrees Conferred, June, 1968 207 

Degrees Offered 73 

Denominational Groups 49 

Departmental and Other Clubs 56 

Dining Hall— Seacobeck Hall 16 

Directions for Application 22 

Directions for Applying for Admission with Advanced Standing 26 

Directions for Readmission 25 



Drama Series 47 

Dramatic Arts and Speech— Departmental Course Offerings 113 

duPont Hall 13 

E. Lee Trinkle Library 14 

Early Decision Plan 23 

Economics— Course Offerings 116 

Economics and Political Science— Departmental Course Offerings 116 

Education 

Certification Requirements for Grades One through Seven 121 

Certification Requirements for Secondary School Subjects 122 

Education— Departmental Course Offerings 121 

Educational Opportunity Grants 38 

Elective Courses 75 

Elective (Defined) 60 

Elementary Education, Cooperative Program in 91 

Employment 40 

Enforced Withdrawal 67 

English— Departmental Course Offerings 1 29 

Environment and Location 10 

Events, Other 48 

Excess Hours 61 

Excuses 62 

Faculty Adviser 51 

Faculty Committees 203 

Faculty Roster 187 

Failures 64 

Fees and Expenses 31 

Fees, Other 35 

Field Trips and Tours 54 

Final Honors 68 221 

Financial Assistance 

Eligibility and Tenure 36 

Fine Arts Center 12 

First Semester— Calendar 4 

FMC Corporation, American Viscose Division, Award 38 

Foreign Languages 76 

French— Course Offerings 1 50 

General Information 5 

General Undergraduate Scholarships 38 

George Washington Hall 14 

Geographical Distribution of Students by States and Countries, 

Session of 1968-69 217 

Geography and Geology 133 

Geography— Departmental Course Offerings 133 

Geology— Departmental Course Offerings 134 

German— Course Offerings 153 

Goolrick Hall 14 

Grading 63 

Graduate Study, Preparation for 76 

Graduation, Requirements for 70 

Greek— Course Offerings 110 

Guidance and Counselling 51 

Hatton Lathrop Clark Scholarship 37 

Health Education— Course Offerings 136 

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation— Departmental Course 

Offerings 135 

Health Program 50 

Health Regulations 51 

History— Departmental Course Offerings 141 

History and Literature of Music— Course Offerings 163 

History of Art Major 100 

History of Art— Course Offerings 102 

History (of the College) 8 



INDEX 



Home Economics— Departmental Course Offerings 145 

Honor System, The 45 

Honorary Organizations 55 

Honors Work 68 

Hugh Mercer Infirmary 15 

Individual Instruction in Music... 165 

Infirmary— Hugh Mercer 15 

Intermediate and Final Honors 68 

Internship Program for the Preparation of Teachers 94 

Introduction 7 

Italian— Course Offerings 155 

Junior Year Abroad 77 

Kitchenettes and Pressing Rooms 16 

Kiwanis Award 69 

Lalla Gresham Ball Scholarships 36 

Language Houses and Laboratories 53 

Latin— Course Offerings Ill 

Liberal Arts Seminar 147 

Library, E. Lee Trinkle 14 

Loans 39 

Location and Environment 10 

Lt. General Albert J. Bowley Scholarship Fund 37 

Major Program 75 

Major Program (Defined) 60 

Marriage 67 

Martin Luther King Memorial Scholarship 38 

222 Mary Washington College Scholarships 39 

Mathematics— Departmental Course Offerings 147 

Medical Excuses 62 

Medical Specialists, Private Nursing, etc 50 

Medical Technology, Cooperative Program in 84 

Melchers Hall 13 

Minnie Rob Phaup Memorial Scholarship 38 

Modern Foreign Languages— Departmental Course Offerings 149 

Monroe Hall 13 

Mortar Board 55 

Mu Phi Epsilon Scholarship 38 

Music— Departmental Course Offerings 161 

National Defense Student Loan Program, The 39 

New Students 34 

Nursing, Cooperative Program in 88 

O. P. Wright Memorial Scholarship Fund 39 

Organizations , Student 55 

Part-Time Students 32 

Payment, Terms of 33 

Philosophy— Departmental Course Offerings 1 66 

Physical Education— Course Offerings 137 

Physical Therapy, B.S. Degree in 74 

Physical Therapy— Cooperative Program in 86 

Physics— Departmental Course Offerings 1 69 

Placement Bureau 53 

Political Economy and Public Affairs— Course Offerings 121 

Political Science— Course Offerings 118 

Political Science and Economics— Departmental Course Offerings 116 

Pollard Hall 13 

Portuguese— Course Offerings 1 56 

Post Office 16 

Pre-Foreign Service— Interdepartmental Major 81 

Pre-Medical Sciences— Interdepartmental Major 83 



INDEX 



Preparation for Graduate Study 76 

Preparation of Teachers, Internship Program for the 94 

Preparation , Scholastic 19 

Pressing Rooms 16 

Probation 66 

Program of Studies 71 

Psychology— Departmental Course Offerings 170 

Purpose of the College 7 

Quality Point (Defined) 60 

Readmission to the College 25 

Recognition of Academic Achievement 68 

Recreational Association 56 

Refund of Fees 34 

Regulations, Academic 60 

Religion— Departmental Course Offerings 174 

Religious Life 49 

Repeating a Course 65 

Reports, Deficiencies, and Failures 64 

Required Course 60 

Requirements for Graduation 70 

Residence Halls 16 

Residence Requirements 26 

Residential Life 47 

Returning Students 34 

Richard Kirkland Memorial 11 

Riding 138 

Riding Fees 35 

Room Furnishings 16 

Russian— Course Offerings 156 

Scholarship Quality Points 64 223 

Scholarships 36 

Scholarships and Loans— Eligibility and Tenure 36 

Scholastic Preparation 19 

Science Hall 12 

Seacobeck Hall 16 

Second Semester— Calendar 4 

Semester Fees and Expenses 

Students Living in Residence Halls 31 

Full-Time Day Students 31 

Off-Campus Teacher Training 31 

Semester Hours 60 

Semester Plan 59 

Seminar, Liberal Arts 147 

Social Life 47 

Sociology— Departmental Course Offerings 175 

Spanish— Course Offerings 157 

Special Services and Opportunities 51 

Speech, Dramatic Arts and— Departmental Course Offerings 115 

Speech Pathology and Audiology, Cooperative Program in 91 

Spotswood House 16 

State Scholarships for Teachers 40 

Status, Academic 8 

String Ensemble 1 64 

Student Activities Building— Ann Carter Lee Hall , 15 

Student Bank 35 

Student Employment 40 

Student Government Association 44 

Student Life 

The Student and the College 41 

Student Load 61 

Student Publications 56 

Student Welfare 43 

Studio Art-Course Offerings 100 

Studio Art Major 99 

Summer Session 59 



INDEX 



224 
INDEX 



Supervised Teaching 1 28 

Suspension 66 

Table of Contents 3 

Teachers, State Scholarships for 40 

Teaching 75 

Termi nology 60 

Terms of Payment 33 

Theatre 53 

Theory of Music— Course Offerings 162 

Thomas Howard and Elizabeth Merchant Tardy Endowment Fund, The... 39 

Thomas Jefferson Cup, The 69 

Transfer of Credits 28 

Trinkle Library 14 

Typewriting 121 

Unit (Defined) 60 

Utility Rooms— Kitchenettes and Pressing Rooms 16 

Virginia Student, Classification as 32 

Visitors 2 

Visitors of the University, The 1 80 

Voluntary Withdrawal 67 

Welfare, Student 43 

Withd rawal 67 

YWCA 49